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Did You Hawk Anything On The Streets As A Child ?

I just wanted to know.

Tell us what you hawked on Nigerian streets (if any) to help the family financially.

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Ha ha,

Just saw this.

I be champion. I hawked ice water and cashew from agbo malu to bandry (boundary) market for apapa area there.

raise money to buy pigeons and rabbits which multiplied and became a multi naira business for me.

luckily things come better, i come manage go school.

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Interesting thread.

I have hawked sold a lot before turning 16

Ranging from "udala" fruits I would wake early to pick and sell to classmates in JS2 to "akamu" (maize pap) sold in the surroundings before going to school. I have sold broilers (parents own poultry farm), cassava, slippers (biz arrangement with cousin), iced water, soft drinks, plantain and banana bunches etc.

I have sold books (holiday job), computers , clothing and processed food (uncle's biz). The last four while in the university.

Selling and feeling the wad of notes thick in your pocket is fun. Aku na-esi obi ike (Wealth gives morale!)

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I hawked moinmoin and akara.

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i will never forget where God picked me from. my story is very touchy. hence i'm a lil bit upset when i see overt arrogance or self centeredness in nairaland

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My dear the Lord has been good to us.

took some time off for the summer

how's your family?

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i hawked pap (ogi), i also hawked plantain,banana and i sold moi moi and eko in the rain,so is maize with coconut,kai those years wasn't easy sha but to God be the Glory things have turned out for extremely Good.

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@beewhyfocs.

I thank the FATHER on your behalf.

"Its not where we come from that matters, but where we are, and it even matters more, where we are going"!

Lastpage.

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Reading through this thread reminds me of my childhood experiences. Im constrained by time and space to compress the stuffs I hawked and the circumstances surrounding those experiences.

In a brief recap, I started hawking from pry 4 (1991) and had to stop in SS3(1999) when I became the assistant senior prefect in my school. I hawked all kinds of stuffs ranging from Orange, Tangerine, guava, cooked corn in the rain, apple, pineapple and all sorts of fruits and food stuffs that I cant but stop mentioning. Those were days when the family eked out livelihood from the return on the meagre investments on fruits and food stuffs hawked around town in Somolu, Bariga and Onipanu areas in Lagos (for those that know those areas). For me, selling was interesting as my mother had to entrust those goods into my hands expecting me to use my judgement to fix the prices such that the business would break even. As little as the capital were, the returns were always in order of 150-300% for such products even if it was little. The family of six was always sure of food on the table at the end of the day as a result of the sales both at home and on the street.

The most important skill I developed was the selling acumen and a seemingly sweet and convincing attitude as I learnt from childhood to convince my customers to buy whenever I was called. Come to look at it, I was always among the best 3 students in my class even if I never attended any extra tutorial classes after school hours. The motivation was always there to read after coming back from sales trip. I learnt to study over night and read for exam right from Primary six which eventually turned out to be a strenght for me in my secondary school and University. I came first in my common entrance out 180 pupils and proceeded to secondary school where I was always among the top 5.

I never felt ashamed of the hawking until I became a prefect and I had to use the excuse of my SSCE for my mother before I could be allowed a break. Dont misunderstand me, I was not forced into hawking at all. My parents are loving and one of the best parents you could ever dream of having as they brought us up in the way a responsible parents should. But inadequacy in finance led to all that and I am grateful today that I did then.

Despite all that, I made my SSCE in flying colours, proceeded to the University to study engineering and currently on a federal govt. scholarship in London for my MSc in Mech engineering. Those years seems to be history now, as things are changing for better each day. I still wonder how on earth God gave me such amazing tenacity and in-built inspiration to go through all those years in joy, they were the best years of my life and would definitely form a lasting impression in my memory.

In all these, I give God the glory and I say to all who are going through such situations that with extra perseverance and commitment you will be out of it soon. Its a light affliction and its for a moment. One thing is certain, God has not left anybody so poor that you can't find, at least, idea to survive. It might not be the norm but the peculiarity of our situations could warrant such.

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this is actually a very touching topic, i have never hawked in my life , but for all of you who came from very humble beginnings, never forget where you came from, and always try to help, some children who hawked were used for rituals,converted to become armed robbers e.t.c therefore it's a miracle for those of you who have survived and done fantastic things with your life.we all have our own levels of struggle but the lesson is to learn from our experiences and hope that we have become better persons.

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Pervert9,

That wasnt funny

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I initially refrained from droping  a line here,but having read Lastpage n Osisi's heart-rending experience,my emotions betrayed me.I guess u guys can sit back and smile over it now.Believe me sincerely, I had to call my mum and tell her how much I appreciate all she has done.

With out a doubt  she paid that ultimate price for us,hawked all sorts to fund her education. Not forgetting my loving  dad as well.

where do u I begin,is from when I failed  JAMB,I cried my eyes out and then Unilag diploma fee was debatable ,in a spur of moment,she came home with a cheque or is it my Masters programme that she funded 50-50  with my dad. Now,is give back tyme n they def appreciate every bit of it.That is life,to whom much is given, much is expected. As last page noted, u dont reap where u ve nt sown,a pause for thought for all. It cuts across every sphere of our lives,relationship with spouse,friends n what not.

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Hmmm,  I never hawked, but I sold pekere, and later chinchin, in high school. Not coz I needed the money, but coz I wanted it. I stopped the pekere because green plantain was just too freaking hard to peel and made my nails green. I stopped the chinchin coz my mom made me realize that I wasn't making the profit I thot I was, seeing that I was using her oil, kerosine, e.t.c. I guess that was my first education on Net vs Gross profit.

To those who did it coz they needed to, kudos.

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Wow, all the stories are humbling. I pray none of your children will have to pass through the same experiences again!!!

AMEN!!!

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hey to you all!

An intersting topic if you ask me!!!!!!!!!

All of us no be ajebo!!!!!!

Many of us hawked things oh no be small!!!!!!!!

For me sha, it was what was then called BUISCUIT BREAD (e no dey market again), bums, groundnut, popcorn (not the types you have today though)!!!! In short the list is endless!!!!!!!!!

THIS WAS BASICALLY HOLIDAYS' STUFF!!!!!!!!!! THE MONEY TOO WAS FOR ME TO KEEP!!!!!!!!

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God, well, i believe we that went through this way of life really learned alot about hardwork and survival race, my dad's job was never for the poor, yet almost all of us hawked, it was only the first child that didn't hawk, i bet he was just being pampered at then, i just thank God, my dad's late now, yet his children and my mom is still alive, if i tell you guys how many we are, una go bow,

my mom still remains the best mother on earth with what you went through (child bearing and raising)

that woman will never no suffer again as long as God exist.

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Wow, i have just read all the posts and people don try sha! A big hand to all those who have had very humble beginnings

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Me i sale wan die??

i sold groundnut in KD both fresh and fried. and GUGURU. i also sold KOKO (pap) , sold bread (Idris morrow then, fesojaiye, kajola breads) , sold water in trains ( lagos - kano, Portharcourt - kano) thats at kaduna junction. i sold KUNU ZAKI and all.

Mom sales firewood and AKAMU to send me to sch now ican only thank god 4 d position i find maself 2day. i also have to do labourer work in order to b able to buy jeans and all that i use to oppress in UNi. if only those gals know wat i do to buy those cloth

Anyway, with my own car now i can only look back and giv all glory to Almighty God. i stil com across Some of my customers uptill now but na to speed pass oohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

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In my case i took turns hawking bread around Tincan Island Port and provisions around Olodi Apapa. But men, back then you were made to feel the impact of the family's economic condition. Like if you didn't make sales the family woundn't eat.

Damn!!!!!!!!!

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If you take a closer look,those who hawked at one point in time and were able to READ turned out pretty good in life. Not suggesting that, hawking made the difference,but I'm saying that,the discipline instilled was invalueble.

some hawked and are still in the street selling recharge cards or now own a small kiosk others used the attendant lessons and blossomed into greatness,at least something admirable.

Seen a few posters saying,they're better off today. Personally,I'm doing very well.Glad my mom is here to enjoy it.

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More people hawked than didn't amongst the responders

I am shocked!

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If I have to start I may not get it listed 100%. I used to be a street football machinery at 10 but the vogue shifted to street hawking. even though my mum had stuffs to sell I was not recruited until I said I wanted to cos that was all my friends on the street were doing. So I joined and enjoyed it all the way then stopped it b4 I completed my secondary school.

With the trade, If I had to ask anything as in school fee its only to spend but I always pay my school fee and other charges even before I let them know at home.

If fact, it allowed me to keep up with the "guys" ! Market life was sweet! you know after graduating from the street you go to sell in the market. then I went on to operate my own business. which was to carry heavy loads for market women. Cool guys! but I tell you I wont blame the children cos it was joyful and until you get to know there is a better life elsewhere you wont think of going out.

Accident put an end to my sorjourn while on my way from Ogun state I had an accident so It now made me stop going to market then I mixed with children who stayed at home, from there I got to know about other businesses the "guys" do (all this does not include cheating, conductor, or yahoo). jobs like bricklaying, bakery boys and wash-man!

It was fun but my story changed immediately I exposed myself to book then I aspired to a better life which am now living.

Each I go around my former hood, I still see my ex-colleagues still strongly on the street.

It's was fun and industrious! It shaped my life. I could remember our parents telling us that it is wat you work for that last longer and beneficial for you, hence we didnt cheat.

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As for me o, I hawked yam, bread, palm oil and I think em vegetables. That's part of the many testimonies I have today, Now I am a Banker with one of the DFIs in the world.

Okechukwu

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very touching your mama is def proud of you where she is

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i almost started crying when i saw this topic cos it reminded me when i was abt four yrs old. one day i ran to my mother in the spot she used to rest after hawking for a very long time, it was to go show her my report card. that is the greatest moment i remember having with her. my dad had money, but he never was interested in her welfare. she did it for me. i wish she was here now!!!

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it all started when my dad married my stepmum,we moved from Ogedengbe street Warri,to UDU Market Road,Ovwian Aladja Being that there is a big market there and my neighbour's wife was selling food stuff there, the same fever caught my stepmum, she will send me to hawk Groundnut oil,Tomatoes & Pepper,Crayfish and onion, she changed business to Used clothe known as Okrika ,then to undies and baby clothes after a year she changed her business again to selling of Fresh water fish i used to help her when i come back from schoolor weekends , mostly in the night i will hang the fish on a very slim but strong wood then stand my the roadside for night travellers or night duty workers in the Delta Steel Company and sometimes we close by 10:00pm or 11:00pm.It was hell because am not allowed to complain or i wont eat for 2days but i thank God now at least i can take care of myself.

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lol, na today! i sell ice water for bandry market AJ City in 1979

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is it true that everyone of us really hawk what we have mentioned here, if so what r the pains really like i mean the good and the bad side of it. For me i did really hawk started when i was in sec school use it to train myself in school, that was at the east and i came down to Lagos where i hawk several things starting from pure water, gala,can juice or sort of things just name it all in the high way very very risky where your life is always at risk. My advice is that is quit dangerous but what can a common man do, poor boy or girl where help is handily find. i rest my case

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Sure I did on the streets and crescents of a place called Agbara Estate, and it wasn't bad. Hawked bread, mango etc, but the one that put me off as a child was oranges, i was not so good/fast with the peeling, more often than not I ended up being helped by my customers (housewives), and impatient buyers.

To me it's what has added up to make me who I am, self reliant/dependent, not looking up to anyone to provide from when I was young adult. Wouldn't mind recommending some refined aspect of it as training to my kids.

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i hawk okrika at yaba market, stock fish, onion,tin tomatoe and coconut - times i look back and discover that it was where i got my street sense

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Now I did not hawk any thing but my older brother put up a 5 man masquerade squad consisting of my bros, three friends and myself. I was like 7 or 8 yrs old

We weren't even proper masquerades. we knocked up one face cover (mask) from a coconut tree branch, hijacked a gong from our friends mum's music instruments for their meeting + empty cans from around the corner to make up our musical instruments. Getting a cane wasn't a problem; we simply got one from the nearby mango tree.

We did masquerade from 27th Dec to 5th January until one man gave my bros a knock on the head, seized our "mask" and asked "christmas never finish for your end" ?

Thank God for that man cos my brother was ready to carry on masquerading until the next xmas. We made some bucks sha and thank God my dad ( now that was a cane loving man) didn't catch us.

We bought Jersey and football with the cash and formed our own football team "5 Golden Club" playing 5 a side matches with other kids in the neighbourhood. I still yab my bros till this day.

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@ topic

Hawked a few items at different times in my life

kulikuli, kangu, olele etc in the village with dad's older sister

make-up items, bread, fruits etc with mom before situation improved

Thank God for today

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@Osisi

Its a pity u had to do those jobs u did in the UK, but i bet u learnt a lot from them.

There's a way life teaches us certain lessons we NEED to learn in order to become more HUMAN in the way we see and treat other people. I've actually parted ways with a number of people because of the kind of unbringing they had (The Silverspoon type), not that they're bad people or anything, but by virtue of the way they were brought up, the seemed to believe they were better than other people, and that is against my principles.

Although i never had to hawk anything when i was young, i had my own fair share of hardship, and that has helped me appreciate life better, and also to know that u're not better than the next man, u're just fortunate to have the kind of life u have.

We are not responsible for where we are coming from, but we are responsible for where we are headed.

A slave was conceived in the same way as a free-born, every man is EQUAL in the sight of God.

Cheers

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hawked cigarettes, maurijuana n stuff!

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my father was educated and rich but due to his love for women he married two other women after my mum and this lead to my mum leaving the house, apart from hawking these:

dongoyaro leaves

moin-moin

abari

cooked rice

eko

kerosene

myself and my brother were subjected to all form of abuse, we were always on errends for our step mum and at the end of the day she will not give us food and when she finally give us it will be without meat, she has left us two days without food, these lasted until when we finally reconcile with our mother,

thank God it is all story now.

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I hawk ogede(ripe and unripe Plantain) on the street of Ajegunle. Its was fun but i was ashame whenever i meet any of my classmates and friends.

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@topic

I did not have to hawk anything while i was growing up

but I remember back then when things were kinda difficult at home

my mom had to open a restaurant so as to support the home

and because she and my dad wld go to work there was nobody to manage it and we could not afford to employ people to work for us then,

so I turned manager and cook at the age of 13, immediately I got back from school

without getting home i would go straight to the shop and start to cook

there was nothing that i could not cook from cow tail peppersoup to nkwobi, turkey peppersoup, while cooking I would be cleaning and setting the chairs and tables outside, it wasnt easy at all becos i did not really have time for my studies and there were times when we would close by 11pm sometimes 12 and by the time we got home

i would be so tired that i would just go straight to bed.

I also recall that anytime my mom got back from work she would also come straight to the shop and thoughout she would continue to praise and pray for me and i think that also encouraged me too. Because it wa really tough for me ooo!!! I cant even begin to go into details now!  It was really an humbling experience cos i faced so many challenges!!! And i was so tiny then.

Its still a miracle how i did not become wayward

becos i was exposed to all soughts of men at a very tender age!!!

its fuunny how it is so easy to forget the past

if not for this topic i dont think i wld have givven it a  second thought

Thank God for my life at least i am not doing so badly now.

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I leaved with my brother's wife so i hawked vertually everything except sachet water cox as at that time, it wasnt in the market.

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Yes i did, wen i wos 10, i hawkd cookd rice n stew, my mum z a foodseller although she didnt lyk it bt i enjoy it wit frnds, wen i proceed 2 high den i stop.

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That's true, thinking about it now hurts,but back then it was just fun.I did it for me.I mean I kept my earnings,it was never for the family,mom was trying to teach me something,though not recommended today,I guess it worked for her.She chills now in a nice home in Southern California with Mexican and Filipino maids serving her,courtesy the same kid she taught the virtues of hustling. I think its just the grace of God.For me I owe it to God,not the hawking,though its sort of a slight part of it.

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people will still continue to hawk in nigeria its like a heritage lol but we are still posh small in nigeria sha a friend from brasil told me almost all kids in brasil hawk and on road trying to provide for themselves, as soon as they turn 8 they stop relying on their parents, even if their parents are rich it's just the cool thing to do talk of natural born hustlers lol

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yah,guess i hawked bread in the city of Ibadan in the late 70s.It was fun though then,but now when i think back,don't think it was the best to do,but then i had to do it to assist the family.Wouldn't recommend it for anyone!!

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I hawk pectol at Cemetary market Aba, and A&B accra and bread

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Why do you even bother yourself with things like status?

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@ TIPPY TOP

HELL YEAH!!!!!! but remember say silver get grade, lol.

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This is really nostalgic. Reading of other people having done it in the past informs me that I am not alone in this. I hawked bar soap, gaari, rice, beans, smoked fish, sold chiken at the market . . .Whao, I’ve come a long way. The good news is, my son will never have to go through that. Though its made me better, I still detest young folks doing it today but can’t help it.

I believe it’s the economic situation. May God make it better.

It will definitely get better

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Were you born with a silver spoon?

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Fond Memories, Did i hawk ? Me i know remember oooh.

Na my Mama go answer the question because i dey run away anytime she say make i go sell fish,or dry Okpono,Yam.

Failure to go sell means no feeding Money the next morning to School. I now remember i hawked , yes .

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