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Is Black Really Beautiful?

Is Black Really Beautiful?

Today, due to the impending Thanksgiving holiday in which our school week will end on Tuesday, I decided to show my 7th grade Technology students a movie. The movie, entitled Brother Future, is about a black teenager who does not take his education seriously. He daydreams in class when he should be listening to the teacher and taking in knowledge, he skips school whenever he feels like it, and he steals goods and resells it later to his ever-waiting customers. Well the teenager gets hit by a car and is propelled—not into the future—but back into the 1820s when slavery was in full swing. The purpose of my showing the movie was to help the students identify with the age of the character and his learning that education is a vital component of being successful and is directly connected to the quality of life one will have in the future.

During the film, my students’ eyes were glued on the projection screen, which enlarged the movie to such a degree that it could be viewed from almost any angle in the classroom. My students began to ask me questions about what they were seeing in the movie. For instance, one student said, “Why can’t he tell them he is not going to pick cotton in that field?” Another one said, “If I was back there, I would not do it!” Another asked, “Why does that slave have to go around to the back of his master’s house and not use the front door?” The questions and comments went on throughout the movie, and I answered the questions and joined in the conversations that had sparked many interests about slavery and education, or a lack of Black education, during that time period.

I have a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration, and I moved from the corporate world of business to teach—to make a difference. I am not a history teacher—although I do know history facts and can produce a decent answer when questioned. But what astonished me is that my Black students (for the majority of them are Black) did not know many facts at all about the history of our own people. Sure, some students could tell you that they were told that lynching and beatings and unfair treatment took place, but they seemed surprised about many things that were taking place in the movie. So I asked them, “Does your History teacher talk about slavery in your class?” Most of the students said, “No”. “And if the teacher does, it is only just for a few minutes and we move onto something else.”

I realized in that moment that many of Black America is ignorant about where they came from. Some of my students did not even know that Charleston, South Carolina is documented as being the place where the first slaves were brought to when they landed in America.

Later that evening, I came home and read an article by Michael Oluwagemi II on Nigerians In America entitled, Mark My Words . . . Nigeria and Africa Shall Be Free. I thoroughly enjoyed what he had to say, for I know, by personal observation, how much poverty has taken hold of Nigeria. I have never been able to get those images out of my mind—and I do not want to—for it is what holds me to her (Africa) in my heart. I simply love Africa and its people—although I hate to see the suffering of my people. However, I think another type of poverty has taken hold of Black America, and that poverty, to me, is cultural and ancestral ignorance.

I wrote an article entitled Disconnected from the Motherland some time ago, and after today’s experience, I believe Black America is also disconnected from themselves and their own African history. We are failing to teach our children where they came from—never mind going as far back to the Motherland (Africa), let us at least start at the point when our African ancestors were shackled, chained, and brought into Charleston, South Carolina and sold into slavery.

I wondered why we Black Americans changed our ethnicity name from Black to African American. Who thought of that? Did someone say it was politically correct to be named such? When I think about how much Black America do NOT identify with their African brothers and sisters (as a whole), why do we love the name so much then (African American). Are we merely interested in the theory of Africa but not in the identification with it? I am afraid for many that might be the case.

I have noticed that our Black children do not mind being Black as long as their skin color is not TOO BLACK. Most of them will tell you that they do not want to be to dark skinned and cover their mouths in a grin when they say it as if embarrassed by their admission. If you are light skinned, according to them, you are in another class of “blackness” (a better class as far as beauty). On more than one occasion, my students have referred to a dark-skinned person as an African. They forget in that moment, or at least I choose to believe it was not intentional, that my husband is African. I will say something like, “I guess you have forgotten my husband is African!” Then they will say, “Mrs. Daboh we did not mean any harm.” I remind them that some of the most beautiful men and women in this world are Africans, and they come in all shades of colors like we do. If young Blacks feel that way now and hold those prejudices within their own race of people, I wonder how their children, who will be reared by them, will think of a dark-skinned, Black person or an African.

Nigeria and Africa in all their poverty is really just a heart beat away from the ancestral and cultural poverty that Black America suffers. Are we allowing our Black youths to be groomed to believe that “black is not beautiful?” Is the saying, “I’m Black and I’m proud” just a cliché? I am afraid many Blacks do not mind being Black, as long as it is not TOO BLACK.

Will Black America’s poverty stricken attitude against its own culture prevail to the point that we are, not only ashamed of ourselves, but ashamed of where we originated from? In our eyes, is Black really beautiful?

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73 answers

reality is we as a people r ruined

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I embrace the fact that I was born yoruba...maasai....mandinka.....igbo....luhya.... as African American....

#proudly African

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and would embrace a foreign white culture....

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that's the only problem I have with my people...my mother is like that.

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I love what u saying. but blacks r like.that cuz that's how the familiwe r raising their children to not care about herimage...I agree 100%.

that's the waht the slave masters taught the slaves

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The pretty doll ugly doll experiment. We have a long way to go smh. Where does the self hate come from?

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sorry faya,dts not true,you see

my younger ones and i have what ppl term oyinbo hair,esp my

sister and i,very long straight'irun ogbo' or wateva ppl cal it

and am not mixed in anyway,100%ogun state indigene,

so u might be wrong on dt one

blak is beautiful,in any shade

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I wish you guys would check out my topic "Are you African if you are not born in Africa" coz many of the arguments relating to our history and what it is to be black or African hold true to that topic.

I consider myself African because black is a colour and says nothing about a persons history or heritage. I would even go so far as to call myself African Caribbean as that again says something about my peoples journey and ancestry. Black says nothing but gives white people a way to classify me just a s they did my ancestors, quadroon, sambo, octoroon etc

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Wooly hair: The royal crown

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What was the cause of that divergence? and why didn't the so-called sub-saharan africans also diverge? and why is it that it was the inhabitants of the horn of alkebulan, which is closest to euro-asia, that diverge?

Beware of western pseudo sciences.

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Alkebulanites west of the continent do not have natural straight hair! They have wooly hair.

Those that wear chemically altered wooly hair are the self-hating perm wearing chicken heads.

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Black is Bold & Beautfiul.

I love me some black sistas anyday

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I didn't say they didn't, you should be directing that statement to Fayahsoul, who's claiming all full africans have woolly.

What I'm getting at is that straight hair is indigenous to Africa and African people, and its not suprising to see Africans [who are not mixed] who have straight hair regardless of what country they hail from.

So fayahsoul, are these west Africans not native africans since they have straight hair, or are they mixed since they don't have '' THE ROYAL CROWN ''?

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The term 'Mixed' is very vague. Everyone in this planet is mixed whether they like to believe it or not.

Almost every ethnic Somali can trace their family linage, it's apart of our culture.

As I've stated before, I can trace my family linage to 23 generations and not one single person was anything other than a native of Horn of Africa, we are ancient people, we looked the way we do for centuries so have our neighbours who are genetically related to us.

The following statement is by The European Journal of Human Genetics, who have carried out a study in NE Africa.

Overall, the genetic studies conclude that Somalis and their fellow Ethiopian and Eritrean North-east African groups represent a unique and distinct racial bloc on the continent:

''The most distinct separation is between African and non-African populations. The northeastern-African -- that is, the Ethiopian and Somali -- populations are located centrally between sub-Saharan African and non-African populations,  The fact that the Ethiopians and Somalis have a subset of the sub-Saharan African haplotype diversity -- and that the non-African populations have a subset of the diversity present in Ethiopians and Somalis -- makes simple-admixture models less likely; rather, these observations support the hypothesis proposed by other nuclear-genetic studies (Tishkoff et al. 1996a, 1998a, 1998b; Kidd et al. 1998) -- that populations in northeastern Africa may have diverged from those in the rest of sub-Saharan Africa early in the history of modern African populations and that a subset of this northeastern-African population migrated out of Africa and populated the rest of the globe. These conclusions are supported by recent mtDNA analysis (Quintana-Murci et al. 1999).''

NE Africans take the 'mixed comment' as a insult.

Ps. My apology to the topic starter, for going off topic.

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if you don't have wooly hair your genes are not predominantly alkebulan therefore you are not an alkebulanite.

Natural untampered Wooly hair is the royal crown of god/goddesshod. The original 12 root hue-man races had them.

Alkebulanites came from the sirius star system to terra/earth millions of yrs ago and have established numerous civilizations throughout the world before the johny come lately's(white/arab/semites/asians) surfaced via genetic experimentation. So these other groups devolved from the original alkebulan genetic template. Groups in alkebulan that don't have wooly hair are not indegenes but settlers either by immigration or invasion.

Wrong. Those with wooly hair are indegenous the rest are not!

There was a mix of devolved genetic material with all 12 root races in all continents. In alkebulan some alkebulanites are 100% pure root race while others are mix but, nonetheless, contain a predominantly alkebulan genetic repository. Every group on terra/earth could trace their lineage back to the alkebulanites and those that have lost the crown(wooly hair) are heavily mixed and have a predominantly devolved genetic template.

Yep! your group is definitely heavily mixed with arab and some aryan. A lot of groups at the horn are as well.

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Over 85% of my genes are predominantly African, therefore my genes are mainly African.

The loyal Crown? Like I said in my part of the Continent very few people have Woolly hair. Curly/wavy hair is more like our *Royal crown*.

One particular characteristic can't describe and label the inhabitants of an entire Continent or a particular race. Its like saying only south east Asians have slanted eyes, come on that's bullshyt. 

Every human characteristic is indigenous to African except for the white skin.

There was obviously a mix of foreign blood in Africa, but that blood didn't introduce non-woolly hair to certain Africans.

Ps. I'm a ethnic Somali from Somalia and Socotra

By the way, its not only my ethnic group which carry this gene, a lot of ethnic Horn of Africans carry it aswell *I dont know about the rest of Africa*

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That's exactly what i'm saying. The genes of your ethnic group is not predominatly alkebulan since wooly hair is not common there. You have lost the royal crown(that's if ever your group had one in the first place). There definitely was a heavy mix of foreign (white/arab/semitic/asian) savage blood sometime in the past.

may i ask which ethnic group this might be?

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Sorry, but I think you might have miss understood me, I didn't say that woolly hair didn't exist within my ancestors, lord knows its likely it did. What I meant was I can trace my linage to 23 generations, therefore I know I'm 100% African and I have no foreign blood in me, & in my family today no one has wolly hair. Which obviously means that straight/wavy and curly hair is indigenous to Africa and Africans.

My Family was only an example, Woolly hair isn't common among my ethnic group and my part of the dark continent , while curly and wavy hair is very common.

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More info on our royal crown:

http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-199041.195.html

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Africa is a land of diversity.

Since Africa is the cradle of Mankind, light skin and straight/wave/curly hair is native to Africa and Africans.

I'll use my own family as an example.

In my own family, our skin complexion ranges from very light [like arabs or latinos] to very dark. Whats even more surprising to outsiders is the darkest person in my family who is my youngest brother has bone straight patch black hair, majority of people mistake him for a Sri-Lankan.

I'm 100% black and 100% African, with straight/wavy hair and brown skin.

I can even trace my family linage to 23 generations and not one single person in my family has wolly hair. The only person who comes close to having wolly hair in my family is my little sister, and yet her hair is more curly than wolly and its dark brown, with light brown hightlights [all natural], heck even her eyebrows are brown lol.

My fathers youngest brother who has never left Africa, is light skinned man, with greeny/browny eyes and light brown straight hair, while my 1st cousin, who is also 100% black and African has ginger cury hair.

This type of diversity is very common among many people from my neck of the forest.

What im trying to get at is, Straight hair, and light skin is native to Africans and Africans. You don't have to be mixed to be light skinned and to have straight hair.

Africa is a continent not a country, we haven't got the same genes therefore we all look different.

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I would shun any duty to teach an adult the color chart. If you had detected any sign of angry in post, it is because of incessant display of stupidity and inferior mentality by most Africans.

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@ dede I

you sound quite upset! with that tone, you cannot convince people with your opinion. Just my observance.

happy new year

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If you know all that and still play stupidity, then why do you worry about the misnomer like racism? I have read some posts by few dunces on this forum that started with White people, Black people and ended with Asian people. I do not see any difference in skin color between a person from Finland and Japan. Even the skin color of certain people from Nigeria had nothing to do with black. I had always and sternly corrected anybody who dared referred to Africans as black.

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@ dede 1

we know all that but "it is what it is"

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It is unpardonable ignorance to describe human beings by color. No human being is white, blue, red, green, yellow, purple or black. The adjectival clause of color was employed by colonist as a disdainful tool on Africans.

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http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-199041.0.html

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Black is profoundly beautiful.

Why do you think everyone else wants to look like us?

This is why the caucasians having Tanning saloon, because they want to look brown.

And when do you think they use hair rolls at the hair dresser.

I can't understand why black women want to bleach and straighten their hair like a Caucasian or Indian.

Can you see that only Nuwaubians, Nuwbuns, Nubias, Africans, Nigerians, blacks whereever you want to call us have woolly hair.

All other men and animals have furs similarly to what animals have.

We are unique because only us have woolly hair, all other creatures man and animals have furs.

When people worship so-called white (pale skinned) people than you have this problem wondring whether black is beautiful.

You know black is the most beautiful.

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Actually, all of you are incorrect. The first place in the US to ever receive slaves was St. Augustine, Florida, in the late 1500's when the territory was still under Spanish rule. James Town actually started out by taking in African indentured servants along with British ones in the very early 1600's, and it wasn't until about the 1630's that they began taking in African Slaves.

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can we move on forward please

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How can someone ask such question!?? *hiss*

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Black is gorgeous, ebonically beautiful.

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royal family members being sold into slavery happened rarely.

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. . . I'll just address the issue of slavery

Charleston SC was the major port of entry for slaves into the USA. About 70-75% of all slaves brought into the US came through that port.

http://www.historiccharleston.org/experience/arh/slavery_charleston.html

The first slaves in what we consider now to be the USA were also brought into SC in the area that became Charleston, however, the first slaves brought into British held territories were brought into VA, likely Jamestown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_Colonial_America

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Well as for me, im very proud of where i came from. Im african american and very proud of my roots. I know i came from kings and queens in my native land mama africa. I have been proud of it since i was a child. The kids at school made fun of me because my skin was chocolate, and it hurt for along time. Now i love being a beautiful african american dark skinned female, and wouldnt change it for the world. As for african americans being ignorant about where they came from i can only say this; i know my history and up until recently we didnt have a way of tracing our roots because we were sold off, separated, names changed, Now they can take dna are trace the exact part of africa our ancestors come from. When my results come back, im going to that part of africa first. I wonder how they will accept me. Any way all african americans dont feel that they dont have ties to africa of course we do. And yes black is so so beautiful.

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Hmmmm--

Interesting thread.

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This is all partly true especially the notion that the darker you are the uglier you are. I am medium skinned but compared to the light skinned kids in my school i was darked skinne, and a couple days ago a conversation sparked about beauty and we were talkin abpout which girls are pretty and which are not, and this white gurl had the nerve to tell me i was pretty, for a darkskinned black girl. And this other white gurl was like ya, a lot of black gurls are ugly, and i just sat there, like what the fukin hell. And just yesterday i had a picture of rihanna and this other white gurl was like she is pretty for an African- American. All this bullshit is leavin me stunned. i feel it all spins from blacks hatin each other it is like a divide and conquer situation, we are judgin each other and insulting and clasifying each other, they see that and they als o insult us

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I agree and to answer your question are "Black" people united. I put "Black" in quotes because it is a meaningless term from the Creation of Race but for this conversation I will continue using it. I think that they are not so united today because we have lost our way.

Now, lets look back 50 years and the state of "Black" people around the world. What did the world look like? Well in the States "Black" people were not free, the continent was under colonization for the most part still, etc. Lets look back 100 years and picture still is the same and "Black" people in Brazil were just ending their enslavement no more than a 2 decades before.

If you look at what I stated I think you will see that in the past 50 years we have made big strides around the world. With that said, we are now trying to find our way and figure out how to make that next step. I think people need to understand that change doesn't happen overnight and takes a long time to happen. There were ups and downs over the period of enslavement and colonization period but finally we became united and won our freedom all over the world. This will happen again to push us to the next phase.

I think that it is also beyond just thinking of "Black" is beautiful in terms of just appearance. I see it in more the terms of "Do people think that anything "Black" is great?" in the sense of institutions etc. When I say institutions I mean educational, business, political, etc. I think that is what will play into development. I wonder, if one doesn't think that the institutions that we create are great will they work in unity to make them grow?

@poster

Now looking at Is "Black" Beautiful issue. I really don't think this is just an African American issue but one all around the world. The Creation of Race (junk science) by Europeans affected African people around the world. However, I agree that people don't think that their African features are beautiful and that "Black" is Beautiful is just lip service.

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copying "contact lenses" isnt necessary spoilt nor is getting a hair color NOT inherent in your genes.

Im so NOT against weaves but when you get the ones that are obviously not of your race then there's a sad problem. I think the same of asians with blonde hair. Who dash am? That's why they look so silly with it. Cos it wasnt meant for either races.

There are women of variious races that wont have anything to do with asian men, same difference. Btw I assume you know alot of the times people racist against another racist end up having secret longing for the race they claimed they despise? I think it's hilarious.

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when I look in the mirror,I love what I see.

That's all that matters

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I have a lot of things to say about this topic because it's very close to my heart put I'll just say this.

For the past 4000 years black people have been demonized because of fear!!!!! It started with the first wonder of the world when our forefathers in Kemet or Chem also known as Memphis( Land of Menes) built the first Pyramid and people from all over the world came to witness these dark skinned people with the most advanced civilization on earth.

I can go on but I have things to do so PLEASE buy this book, THE DESTRUCTION OF BLACK CIVILIZATION by Chancellor Williams, it's only like $20 on Amazon. Read this with as much enthusiasm you read the bible/koran with, if we don't learn from our past mistakes we will keep doing the same SH#T over and over again.

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@ Debosky, no one is saying go into the core of the sun, all am saying is that it's silly to walk around with an aumbrella or not wanting to do anything in the open air for fearing of getting dark. Like I said it's melanin, it comes and goes, thus tanning. Also why the pint of your mother being light, do you want a clap.

Just because I decided to stop putting lye, which is a very dangerous chemical in my hair does not equate to wearing wrapper. Why don't you wear wrapper or perm your hair. So it;s too superficial to discuss issues that have black people all over the world in denial. Is it also superficial that people put chemicals with mercury in the name of getting light?

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lol and you hang around these people?

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I thought it was common knowledge that overweight black females look better than overweight white ones. Black females hardly have vicerious veins or spiderwebs

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I saw a documentary recently which highlighted the that. It is indeed sad. I have 6 plus teaching experience as well. However, not under the AMerican system, but rather in my islands. I must say I tried it here for 1 year but quit, it is nothing like home. The school system here reminds me a lot of prison. Back home Teachers RULE!!

Regarding the issue of blacks not being able to read and/or write. Is it a problem that they are responsible for, or is the system set up in such a way to deprive them from that attaining such?

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Of course yes, even the white ones knows that, but they use all their means at their reach to potray their looks as the best race in the world.

Black is beautiful,  but our grassroot problem is civilisation and lack of encouragement towards development. Unity and rule of law contributes immensely to any societal development in the world. The question now is,  " Are black people united at all"?

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@Islander

Yes, I teach on the middle school level in the public system. This is my second year now. Prior to that, I taught Adult Education, which is sad in itself, for many Black, South Carolinians cannot read or write well. Prior to that, I worked in the insurance industry.

Thank you for the compliment.

Patricia

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SAME SENTIMENTS HERE. I guess with the Thanksgiving fever I somehow began thinking "pilgrims, mayflower, Jamestown.LOL.

@topic

I am amused by some of the posts that I have read regarding this topic. For centuries the dilemma of "black" and "blackness" as we know it continues to plague us. While it is true, that as blacks we should appreciate and love ourselves for who we are, the reality is we live in a world that doesn't make that so easy.

Look at the Bible, The Bible in itself is where we encounter our very first contradiction in terms of what is good and bad. And I am paraphrasing here, Black is synonymous with sin and anything bad, while White refers to anything good, pure. Now from an early onset, we have been brainwashed into believing that "Black" is evil and should not be associated with anything good.

Having said that, I do not in any way condone the bleaching of skin, or the wearing of blond wigs( gosh if only some of those ladies know how hedious they look) and green eyes. However, for many who resort to such practice, only do so in an effect to fit in. A church friend of mine went for an interview recently at a well established bank here in NY. According to her while waiting to be called she met another interviewee. She later disclosed to me that as she entered the office for the interview she overheard the interviewer telling one of his colleagues that the lady who just left has excellent qualifications, but he is not sure as to how their mainly white customers (this bank is on the UES of Manhattan) would react to having a "black" person handling their finance. The black person he was refering to happened to have the lady my friend had met earlier.

While we may all sit and moan about the "black" issue, the truth is the USA is a racial divided country and people will go that extra mile to fit in. It that extra mile involves, blond wigs,and green and blue contacts, hey they are going to do it even if we preach like John the Baptist.

Funny enough the same people who are now bringing inter-racial relationships into their arguments are the same one who have repeatedly degraded their black sisters by using remarks such as "fat does't look well on blacks, but it does on whites" Spare me the drama, abeg.

Many black men would dump their beautiful black wives or girlfriends because of self-esteem problems. I had a male friend at my "Community College" LOL, who told me he would give anything to sleep with a white chic. Now tell me if this in it self isn't an example of inferiority complex?

I have no problems with whites dating or marrying blacks. My uncle in london was happily married to a white lady for 38 years. She treated him like a King( according to him). He was happy up to his dying day, and that was the most important thing.

This issue has now even been transfered to the naming of your child. I few years ago I had a client whose dad lectured me on the topic of naming my child. He works with a huge mortgage company on Wall Street. He confessed that many at times she people apply for jobs, instead of paying close attention to their qualifications, they first look at the names. In other words someone with the first name "Matthew or Noah" would be given top priority as opposed to someone bearing the names "Shaquan" or "Malik",

There are so many other instances that one can list to highlight the "thin line" between this whole racial "curse", Too bad, time is of the essence,

@Pmdaboh, Interesting thread, One of the very best here so far, Are you in the public school system?

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@PMDABOH

Thanks for the further information.

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