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Mother Tongue Or English At Home?

It has been argued that to take away the culture of a people and enslave them, you first take away their language and make them dislike it. In many families in Nigeria today, we derive pleasure and take it as status symbol when our children speak English and are ignorant of our mother tongue, I used to admire Igbo people because of their love for speaking to their children in their language, but that has changed: English is now the fashion in their communicating with their children.

The disadvantage of not speaking our languages to our children is that they will loose the identity as authentic Yoruba, Tiv, Hausa, Igbo, Bini, Ogoni People e.t.c. In India, Britain, Scotland and Libya, children speak their mother tongues, Indians Chinese, Korean and Japanese children even use computers in their mother tongues.

Let us encourage our children to speak our mother tongue at home and leave the foreign language to the school to handle. More than 100 years ago, Bishop Samuel Ayayi Crowther was able to translate the bible to Yoruba because he was proficient in his Yoruba, His mother tongue. How many parents can read the bible or any other books in their mother tongue?

What is your take on this issue? Please mature comments needed here, Thanks

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85 answers

Indians in Trinidad

Urvashi Ramnarine, an employee at the High Commission of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago in New Delhi says over forty per cent of the population of Indian origin in her homeland speak in Hindi or Bhojpuri.

Hindi is spoken here primarily by the older people, but in recent years there have been efforts to have it included in the educational system. (This is to further weaken the African languages and dialects)

Indian immigration spanned the period from 1845 to 1917 when over 140,000 East Indians were transported to TT

Urvashi says that the Indian population in Trinidad still adheres to Indian culture and traditions.

Diwali is the second largest festival in Trinidad and it is also a public holiday

As many as 12 radio stations are devoted to playing Hindi songs.

Explaining the cultural heritage of Indians settled in Trinidad, she said, "The wedding ceremony, death rituals, the Ganesha festival and Bhumi pooja are conducted in the same way. I feel a huge affinity to these festivals in India. “They were able to do it because of their culture. They have maintained their cultural practice, which has stood them in good stead, This, has kept them together.

Africans in the Caribbean

Africans in the Caribbean fought to maintain their cultural tradition by forming clubs called Nations in all the islands. [b]Each nation had to pledge to preserve African language, culture, religion, and music.

As in the case of North America, much of the African resistance movement was steeped in religion. Despite the attempts at christianization, Africans were determined to have their religions survive. The Shango in Trinidad and Cuba, Voodun in Haiti, Santeria in Cuba, Puerto Rico, Brazil and the Dominican Republic, Cumina in Jamaica, Junkanoo in Jamaica, St. Kitts, and the Bahamas, and Umbanda and Candomble in Brazil, are still surviving today as a result of this resistance. It is possible to find a midnight ceremony in progress in parts of Cuba and Haiti against the backdrop of African drumming.

The church played a strong role in many uprisings. The Africans formed their own churches to fight back christianization. In addition, churches provided an effective meeting place for Africans.

African-Caribbean resistance culture further manifests itself in educational issues. Today there is a major drive towards the reclamation of history and vocabulary.

A number of languages and/or dialects evolved in the Caribbean and Class-seeking Africans and the mixed African-Europeans despised the language.[/b] Nonetheless, the Africans recognized the power in that language.

These languages now form the vernacular of these islands due to the persistence of the people who spoke them. [/b]Today these languages enjoy prominence, and in some places, such as in the French Antilles, and Dutch Antilles, there are government sponsored attempts to document the language, and to create dictionaries. In that regard, the Dutch Antilles are further ahead.

[b]The debt that we owe our ancestry is clear. To allow their work, strength, and courage to go unnoticed, unheralded, and to be superseded would be disrespectful, ungrateful, and unAfrican. We must continue to praise our African parents who struggled for our betterment.

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that's interesting.

I'm from western Nigeria.

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Liedetect

how many Indian west Indians do you know who traditionally speak Hindi?

There's no hard and fast rule for this stuff- it all depends on how close you are to your culture and if its advantageous for your kids to learn the language.

So no need to get upset over everything. No one is saying its bad if kids speak their language and know their culture.

People are looking at[b] present day[/b] America and Europe and ignoring other factors.

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Children who learn a foreign language beginning in early childhood demonstrate certain cognitive advantages over children who do not.

Some countries in the west are now encouraging foreign mothers to teach their children to speak their mother tongue.

All the Indian children I have come across can speak their mother tongue; their parents make it a duty to teach them, unlike African parents.

It is a disgrace and an insult to grandparents when African (Nigerian) children cannot communicate in the language of their parents.

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Should foreign language instruction start earlier in the U.S.?

Beginning foreign language instruction early sets the stage for students’ to develop advanced levels of proficiencies in one or more languages. In addition, younger learners still possess the capacity to develop near native-like pronunciation and intonation in a new language. Finally, young learners have a natural curiosity about learning which is evident when they engage in learning a new language. They also are open and accepting of people who speak other languages and come from other cultures.

Caccavale: Yes, because it has been shown to enhance children’s cognitive development. [b]Children who learn a foreign language beginning in early childhood demonstrate certain cognitive advantages over children who do not.[/b] Research conducted in Canada with young children shows that those who are bilingual develop the concept of “object permanence†at an earlier age. Bilingual students learn sooner that an object remains the same, even though the object has a different name in another language. For example, a foot remains a foot and performs the function of a foot, whether it is labeled a foot in English or un pied in French.

Additionally, foreign language learning is much more a cognitive problem solving activity than a linguistic activity, overall. Studies have shown repeatedly that foreign language learning increases critical thinking skills, creativity, and flexibility of mind in young children. Students who are learning a foreign language out-score their non-foreign language-learning peers in the verbal and, surprisingly to some, the math sections of standardized tests. This relationship between foreign language study and increased mathematical skill development, particularly in the area of problem solving, points once again to the fact that second language learning is more of a cognitive than linguistic activity.

A 2007 study in Harwich, Massachusetts, showed that students who studied a foreign language in an articulated sequence outperformed their non-foreign language learning peers on the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test after two-three years and significantly outperformed them after seven-eight years on all MCAS subtests.

Furthermore, there is research (Webb bibliography) that shows that children who study a foreign language, even when this second language study takes time away from the study of mathematics, outperform (on standardized tests of mathematics) students who do not study a foreign language and have more mathematical instruction during the school day. Again, this research upholds the notion that learning a second language is an exercise in cognitive problem solving and that the effects of second language instruction are directly transferable to the area of mathematical skill development.

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I dont know which part of Nigeria you hail from, but as an Akwa Ibomite, I can tell you with utmost confidence that such a child will not be ridiculed, but will be upheld as the dream child every parent would yearn for, especially if they are verbose in English language, and totally refrain from anything relatable to the indigenous culture.

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I meant they'll still be ridiculed even if they speak their parents language.

Because their attitude and behavior will be different.

This happens until they learn how to blend in, and can still continue afterwards.

maybe some parts of Nigeria dont have this problem sha.

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I highly doubt a child's inability to speak their native dialect in Nigeria will be scorned. Rather, they will be embraced and held to high standards for not being 'local' but being an ajebutta.

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which ever is suitable for u to use with ur kids. it only matters to the extent that u personally want it to

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true talk especially @ bolded.

Most kids who speak English in the home, are still able to understand their mother tongue as long as they interact with people who speak it around them.

I've noticed kids in particular will understand the parent's language to some extent even if they cant speak it. There are so many Nigerians born and raised abroad who dont speak their parents' language but can understand when it's spoken.

And when you go to Nigeria, you learn the language by hook or by crook.

If the parents are worried about their children being ridiculed by other Naijas if they dont speak the language, the kids will still be ridiculed anyway, for being foreign and having foreign mannerisms. Its something they just have to learn to deal with.

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We shouldnt abandon our native dialect in favor of English language, no matter what! We have to recognize our roots. Come, look at some of these chinese, and mexican folks who express a sense of pride in conversing in their native language and some dont even give a hoot about their mastery of English language. Yet, they are surviving in the USA, they get good jobs and all that. I went for an interview some months ago for a position in advertising/sales, and the woman who interviewed me, one (I think) Mexican woman. Gosh, she was so hoity toity, because of what? She was the manager, yet, her English was not that fluent, but she is a manager at this organization. Yet, I did not get the job, even though I can at least speak passable English. So, folks back home who are tempted to think that speaking the queen's language is a gateway to a great job with perks in America are obviously suffering from inferiority complex.

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Number 1 - The logic in this argument is pathetic.

Number 2 - If this is the English (including the structure) you were taught at home to, in as "mush"(sic), give you "an hedge"(sic) over your contemporaries, then Lord have mercy.

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I hold the believe that every child that belong to a family irrespective of tribe will understand  his/her local language-mother tongue in as mush that people in the community speak it. For, parent i believe English language should be used at home to train up the child and in later life when the child grow s up to maturity automatically he/she will understand the native language. more so English language gives a child courage an hedge among contemporaries.

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What is wrong with 'belief in common ancestry'??

You want to question my English when you cannot write in basic sentence in Anglais to save your mum's life.

'UN SEC GEN speaks English more than you?' . . . damn, these blasts hit faster than Pacquiao's hooks

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native language. But they should not forget teaching them english

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A fair mixture of both will do.

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Hi kadman,

Nice to hear from you.

I will pick it up and reply ASAP.

Regards.

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@Ndipe

I've told you before that you cannot use China as a case-study

How can you compare Yoruba to a China's official language??

How dare you blame modern day Nigerians for not using a language that's basically useless once you step into a South-Eastern state??

This will be the last time I'll reply anyone that's not putting forward valid arguments.

@Sagamite

If you don't mind, I'll prefer answering your posts in points, it's saves so I won't need to edit quotes

1. I'm half Yoruba, half Ishan . . . The only reason I concentrated on Ishan is because it's my mum's native language.

And I do speak basic Yoruba, but I only picked it up after I'd already built a foundation in English.

As I said, I'm not against being bilingual, I'm against having backyard language as my first language.

As I said before, for every ten people that have 'gone far' I'll point out thousands that have been inhibited because of the language factor.

2. Identity?? I share beliefs of common ancestry (Except when you start talking of Odudua's snailshell and rooster story), I share many of your values (like being religious and honesty), and I share most customs (except when it's superstion). How does thinking in the world's most important language take away my identity??

Erm, now let's me step out of the picture and be objective here . . . do you think Black-British don't have a sense of ethnic identity??Oh, you think the Jesse Jacksons and MLKs don't feel like they belong somewhere??

Whether you like it or not these same Black-British people have managed to form a culture with a very distinct set of norms and values compared to traditional Africans. Just like how White-Americans are different from their British cousins.

You can attack them if you want to, but you'll be no different from small minded racist pricks.

3. We seem to have different ideals in life, maybe it's because I'm much younger than you are.

Or maybe it's because I've been schooled by these capitalists, but I believe the most important legacy you can give to your child is anything that helps him stand on his own in the future.

And you keep mentioning brain power and all that, am I arguing against the importance of brainpower?? That point is highly irrelevant. I'll ignore that.

4. Hehehe . . . funniest thing I heard all year, Ukranians don't worship the Premiership??

Religiously followed by over half a billion people, so the over 200 countries that watch the EPL don't have good leagues??

You are an intellingent man, but this your arguments are weak.

You accuse me of having a black African mentality, here you are displaying it at the highest level.

I mentioned food as an example of the power of Globalisation, and you're here talking bout liver.

Think outside the box, it helps.

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Here is the profile of the First black CEO of a FTSE 100 company (i.e. the biggest 100 companies in UK).

http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/movers_and_shakers/article5941323.ece

Please note the very first paragraph.

He does not speak good English!

I repeat, people are after your brain power (analytical, visionary and dynamic) as long as you meet a threshold in communicating in English.

And since he was born in 1962 in CIV and returned there to be Minister, one can safely assume he speaks his local language as a first and basic language.

I have been to job interviews where I will forget a word in English (I have a bad memory) and I will laugh (it is not as much a big deal as we colomentalist make it) and ask my interviewers to remind me. And I still get the job offers.

The excuse of not teaching your kids local language because it will limit their achievement is lame. It is just subconcious colomentality.

Be proud of who you are and where you are from. . . . . . . . .Be complete.

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What kind of argument is this?

He is mixed race, has never lived in Kenya, was raised by White grandparents in Hawaii (and partly in Indonesia). How is he going to speak a Kenyan language?

No doubt, he feels a part of him is missing because of his distance from everything Kenyan. That is why he went there looking for his roots despite all his money and success. As I said, school, career and finances are not everything.

It might shock you that there are some proud ones amongst us that can converse in English and our local dialect that are extremely literate and known to be so. Ala Wole Soyinka

So it is not a strong excuse for saying you wouldn't teach your kids your local language. They can learn both but to really learn the local one normally requires it takes precedence in the home.

Everything is not about school, academics and career. If push comes to shove, I can go to any part of Yoruba land and assimiliate and be successful. And I can do the same, even probably more than you, in any English land. Just like the kids from the countries I listed.

You have to hope, they don't already have the mentality that being westernise is better than showing where they are from.

Learning Pidgin English is very much different and easier than learning Ishan or Yoruba.

Extra-help to cope with what? Every subject or just English?

Was the research done for those that have reached adulthood or was it only for those that are kids?

Did it not include migrant johnny-just-come kids that live on giro? Why won't a child with that background need extra help to cope?

Have they done the same research exclusively for children of Continental Europeans with high flying jobs in London that speak both their local language and English? They all head to Oxford and Cambridge.

I know a group of Nigerian kids (from at least 15 different families) that grew up in Italy.

They ALL speak fluent Yoruba, fluent Italian and fluent English, and are all academically successful. No colomentality in their parents. The parents ensured they learnt Yoruba and English by speaking it to them as well as taking them to Yoruba party gatherings and ensuring the bible they read is in Yoruba.

Most of them have only been to Nigeria once or twice in their lives. But now, they are set up to go to Nigeria if they desire and assimiliate even if they choose to live in Oshogbo.

All of them want to marry Nigerians, and with the upbringing it has been very easy for them to get along with Nigerians that grew up in Nigeria.

Bottom point, the average child can learn 2-3 languages side by side without any problem. You don't need to eliminate one for the benefit of another except you are just colomenting. I don't buy the argument.

It is easy to pick out thousand of graduates that can't speak English because of our poor educational system, NOT the fact that we try to be bilingual.

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I am not saying you should have any of these 3 basic languages as I am pretty sure you are Ishan. Unfortunately, if Ishan people gathered I bet you will not hear a word. If I and friends are celebrating something with our Yoruba culture you will only be looking in envy as you are unlikely to be able to do one in Ishan that you call your own.

There are tons of people that have Yoruba as their first and basic language that have gone far more than forward. So I don't see why you will object to it as by all indications it shows it makes you feel complete.

I am not screaming 'patroitism', I am screaming 'identity'. You are nothing if you don't have an identity that you can scream to the world. It is a strong part of human psychology.

The world is not all about suits. The world is not all about career. The world is not all about financial acquisition. I feel more happy and comfortable when I sit amongst people that speak Pidgin English even if they are from Ghana, Sierra Leone or Cameroun. I feel I am part of something, I know where I am from. This is the thing missing from a lot of Nigerian kids that grew up in the UK without home recognition who in later years start thinking of trying to identify with Nigeria when it is almost too late.

In regards to business circles, there are tons of UK people and white for that matter that can't compete with some of us that have English as a secondary language. At the end of the day, it is your reasoning and analytical abilities as well as the a threshold on English that will make you excel in business circles.

Top companies are heading to India (IIT universities) to hirer the best thinkers irrespective of their tonation as long as they can communicate reasonably in English. They are not after the English per se, they are after the brain power.

Bollocks, if the Nigerian FA cup and league was up to scratch, people will forget this whole premeirship stuff. Unfortunately, they have given up on local football due to several years of its ridiculous quality and the Prem just filled the vacuum. I don't think people in Germany, Turkey, Holland, Belgium or Ukraine give a toss about Premiership as they have their own.

And English food is horrible, one of the worst in the world (how many delicacies can you do with liver?), that is why French food has taken over, it filled a vacuum.

My point for listing the countries is that, I don't see them being at a disadvantage in speaking English or studying in English despite having another local language as their first language (whether it is an official language or not). And don't forget that they lived all their lives in the UK but knew they should NEVER forget their identity.

So why not let your child follow the same model except because of colomentality.

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Sad, Sad, Sad!. Cant you teach your kids both your native dialect along with English Language? The black man can scream globalization at the top of their voice to 'justify' their disdain/reasons for abandoning their native dialect, but please tell me, are we more globalized that the Chinese who are so proud of their culture that they speak Mandarin Chinese impeccably, while their command of English Language is not as fluent, in some cases as the black man?

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@Sagamite

You don't seem to get my point, I'm not against being bilingual, I'm all for it

What I'm against here is having Yoruba, Igbo or Hausa as your first and basic language, it's just not the way forward.

You can scream 'patriotism' all you can but we cannot use our kids to correct the mistakes of our founding fathers.

If you really want me to put Yoruba as a priority over English in my home, start from making this Yoruba a language to reckon with in 'Formal Nigeria'

Why raise my kid with a language he can't use once he puts on a suit?? Kids with English as their basic language have an understandably clear advantage in Nigerian schools . . . heck even the proceedings in MOST business circles in Lagos are done in English.

English is Nigeria's first language. You have to accept that, and I'll rather my child had that as his basic language too.

Five years old above, then I can add Yoruba (I'd rather he picked up Spanish though) as his next.

You lot act like Globalisation is such a weird concept, it's simple, fifty years ago, the Nigerian Challenge Cup was the only thing my granddad cared about, now every Ade, Obi and Ahmed has a Fly Emirates replica kit. What do we blame??

In the early 1900s, British food was 'British', the average Brit restaurant is more French that what you'll see in Paris . . . Globalisation

The spread of this Anglais, is too fast for us to ignore, my cousin studies in Ukraine, they teach him in English. We're lucky to have the world's widest spread language as our official lingo, let's embrace it.

German kids, Arab kids, Greek kids, Italian kids, Spanish kids, Urdu kids, Hindi kids, Chinese kids?? Stop listing countries that have these languages as their official language . . . this logic is so flawed

At the end of the day, if Yoruba were to be my country's official language,I will most definitely not be here speaking English.

You're talking about Welsh and Gaelic, some schools and universities teach a few courses in Welsh, this is how to get your kids speaking in these languages, not sitting at home telling me to raise my kids up with Yoruba as a first language in a country were non-English speakers are considered illiterate.

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Somebody said its globalization. I said itz complex/colomentality and that is what it is.

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the emphasis isnt on having an accent. its bout being eloquent in english. everybody has an accent, but its only evident with location. so if a brit, chinese, nigerian etc come over to the US, i'll say he has an accent. n likewise they'l say i have an accent if i visit these places. the point is; theres nothing wrong in having an accent as far as it does not make it difficult for one to understand what d heck u'r saying. i dont think any one has ever found it difficult comprehending nelson mandela's speech.

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Most Indians speak with an accent.

one of the greatest men in the world Nelson Mandela speaks with an accent so what is this thing about having an accent.

I saw Mutombo Speak on TV recently and I so much love his Congo accent unlike Babatunde and Sikira who form a foreign accent.

Blow your Language

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@Mistiky and Asha

I agree with you to an extent, but you need to see where I'm coming from

Indians united and enforced a decree that makes it illegal to run important processes, like the law-making and the budget in English

Before that, they chose one, that's Hindi, to be the official language . . . this annoyed minorities but with social solidarity, they made it happen

Same with China, there's a constant effort by the government to enforce a standard Chinese

But this is not the same wiv Nigeria, Nigeria is an amalgamation of three potential nations

Choosing one as an official language will be difficult, the strenght of a language depends on where it's used

All Nigerian languages are only used in informal circles, hence the 'erosion'

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@ Eldee

China has aloooooooottttttttttt of dialects. I have not implied that it's wrong to be fluent in English, it's even more imperative in Nigeria cuz as you rigthly pointed out, its the official lingo. What i'm sayin is, on a scale of preference, English MUST come second to the local dialect and as regards the topic, if you are financialy sufficient and you can afford to send your kids to good schools, where will they pick up the local lingo seeing as they'll be thought in English and their friends would prolly come from homes where English is the main lingo too (Ajebutas). That limits their exposure to the local lingo which is where the problem lies.

NO MATTER the circumstance, The mother tongue SHOULD NOT take a backseat to English lingo. There's no upside to that. It's a traditional Erosion.

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As I said before, you can't use Germany, Spain and China as yardsticks

These are strong nations with the same language from border to boder, Nigeria is not like that

Even the budget is handed out in Anglais, English is a unifying language in Nigeria. Ishan is useless immediately you step out of Edo state.

Why risk your kid's fluency for something as baseless as that?? Am I less Yoruba cus I don't speak the language??

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My take on this.

Speak your mother tongue very fluently and speak other languages not too fluently or with heavy accent, No shame in this.

Speak other languages fluenlty and with flawless accent but speak your mother tongue not too fluently or without the proper accent/tonality, Lotta shame in that.

I'm not one who gets put off by accent or tonality. Think on it a bit.

How many French, Chinese, Japanese, German, Russian e.t.c citizens pride themselves on being able to speak proper English without tonality while LIVING or RAISED in their native country talk less of prioritising that over their handle of the local lingo. Most they do is just make sure their English is passable. And of course thats just the ones that care to be bothered. That don't make them less cultured or civilised none.

Whats more, the so called English speakers "U.k, U.S, Canada" aren't even bothered that a foreigner speaks English with alot of foreign accent. In fact they expect it. Its only in Nigeia that we choose to embarass ourselves or others by feeling superior or inferior cuz we speak English with alot of accent or poorly.

An Englishman will respect a foreigner alot if He/She can speak flawless English but the moment they realise that it took priority over efficacy in the local lingo, they automatically feel you have placed their culture and language over yours and that fuels their superiority complex which really doesn't need more fanning thereby causing them to look down on your culture and tradition.

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If your clearly illiterate reasoning cannot help you grasp the fact that I was talking of the two strongest agents of socialisation, then believe whichever one helps you sleep at night.

As I said before . . . Anglais is your problem, and maybe semi-illiteracy too

Why not give your kids the advantage of having the most widely spoken language in the world as their basic language??

And you can't use China as your example, English is not their lingua franca

Ever wondered why they're confined to Engineering when they step out of their territory.

English is the world's business language, we're lucky the British colonised us.

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i dont know where u got ur philosophy of changing their language to enslave them, when u use to like igbos

because they speak igbo to their children does it realy make any different now that u dont like them again becos

they dont do what u like., to hell with what u like. the most importhant thing in liife is success, fufilling ur dream in

life, if u need hausa language to be great go for it, if u need latin go for it. barak obama cannot speak kenyan

language yet kenyans are quick in telling the world that he is their own

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Mother tongue my mother is edo my dad is ekiti i can communicate in both cos my mom made up her mind to learn yoruba and now she speaks very well to the extent that she knows the adages in yoruba so i had no choice but to learn both properly

I would advise everyone learn as many as possible but what ever the case is atleast learn your own mother tongue

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My kids will learn, understand and speak YORUBA @ home, let them learn their English from school. I live in America, I can't afford my kids not learning their mother tongue (I need to be able to ba won wi, and talk to them in Yoruba when they are misbehaving while with their oyinbo friends, na d koko be dat). I lived in Ilorin and yoruba was primary language @ home, never got any accent and my English is fluent and good to go. I think havin an accent depends on the environment the child grows up in.

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In my opinion, it should be ratio 1:1, if we can know as much of our native language and value them as we do english language then we can create a better living starting from home.

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@home and everywhere: Speak your Native Language.

But in a setup like Naija, will that work? How are we going to understand ourselves in public etc?

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having a sense of belonging and being true to your roots n origin is vital. . with that said;

i dont believe its compulsory to speak a native language to your kids as a primary language. in my opinion it should be at a ratio of 8:2 (english: native) . this way, they build a solid foundation in english and they still can communicate in the native language when neccesary.

lets face it; being proficient in your mother tongue is good, but definitely not at the expense of quality english skills. we need to see beyond our noses atimes. its a no-brainer for an employer to pick an eloquent candidate at an interview over a half-baked-english speaking one, even though they have equal qualifications.

always think in the context of the "world". truth be told, there are 1 too many nairalanders who will find it impossible to cope on a truly international forum, coz no one will take them seriously after consistent typing of gibberish, even after graduating college. Then when they find themselves abroad, they develop the hugest inferiority complex, owing to poor english. if thats not a handicap, tell me what is.

hiding under the cloak of patriotism, to justify the fact that you come off as semi illiterate isn't good enough, so save your kids from  feeling inferior in the future.

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Peer pressure huh? ?

I only speak English, I do not bow to peer pressure. They have nothing to do the each other.

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eni to so ile nu, o ti so apo iya ko, we should respect our language and teach our children so they will know there root, teni n teni ti akisa ni ti akitan , apa la ra igupa ni iye kan , our own is our own oooo, cheers

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g

@poster

Knowledge of both.

I speak igbo wherever i can and English where I cannot blow my Igbo. Who cares?

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I speak mostly igbo at home, unless it's a word that doesn't exist in igbo, which happens a lot as igbo is complicated, then I use english.

To answer the question, it's to each his/her own. I grew up speaking igbo at home, I'm not about to change.

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I clearly noted that I grew up in a Yoruba state . . . and then I pointed out that my mum's native language is Ishan.

I don't think there's any line from the first poster that says I have to give out personal info on my private life to put forward my point of view.

It's Mother tongue Vs Lingua Franca not 'Tell the whole of the world where your parents are from'

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What's this? Mother tongue or English? U guys make it sound like our kids' brains can hold only one! Come on, they can learn at least 2. Please parents, speak BOTH to ur kids! ah-ah! In a bid to make ur kid culture conscious, dont end up making him or her a limited slowpoke. Use this formula:

                                    Mother tongue  +  English(at least) =complete child.

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The reason why I believe most people wish to speak english is to feel among.

I must state this, what made me very strong, against all forms of peer pressure is my ability to stick be ME, one way or another I loved and still love speaking Yoruba, even in formal gatherings, that uniqueness in itself, gives me a ground to distinguish myself from the lot, and most importantly believe in myself.

No matter what, They need this language to know they are different from uncle smith, that way, they might find it as a source of strength to pull out from what they believe they do not represent.

As a Lagos boy, oh boy, you cannot do without your local language, in fact you are screwed,

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i think parents should speak their native language so that their children learn their own language and also know their culture and heritage they can learn english in school becos if they dont learn frm a young age they wouldnt be able to learn it again like me were my parents speaks english to me at home and wherever, i dont mind them speakin english to me at home but still i would want to know my language. wat a shame!!

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Its good to start training a child how to speak English, its a lot better educationally, Learning mothers tongue is lot easier even when the child is growing.

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I speak many languages but i will never trade my Igbo language for anything. Like Presido said with Ilu and akpa ala okwu.

My kid is 3 years old now, I started by not giving her any English name. Her name is purely Igbo even though i am in Europe, she will grow to know where she came from apart from the Igbo i am teaching her she speaks English and Spanish

We should not allow what colonization did to our parents get to us, at a age where IT softwares are extensively being translated to many languages to preserve them is not the best time in my opinion to lose our local languages.

Imagine a scenario where a GPS gadget indicates the routes and warnings in our local Lingo!! even Oshodi bus drivers will enjoy it.

Our language is all we have today, let us preserve it.

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Because I don't speak Yoruba, the Americans will invade the country . . . bla, bla, bla

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