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Must We Always Bow Down To Tradition?

I'm not opposed to traditions, or anything but it truly get to my head the way Africans take tradition so seriously.There are obviously good traditions, but some tradition like are so ridiculous that I WONDER WHY PEOPLE FOLLOW IT. like for example some silly tradition demands the women to do everything the husband says whether she like it or not. I brought up this topic because my father is "tradition is tradition' sort of person. my dad have a very good understanding of tradition, and he is a sincere followers of traditions. But must we always bow down to tradition ? I am not saying that traditions should not have any place in our lives. But I believe that traditions are products of people's needs. They should bring us happiness and harmony rather than bondage. We love our country because it is our motherland rather than because it is a tradition. By the same token, we love our parents because they brought us up not because it is a tradition. Similarly, we get married because of love rather than tradition.

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most of our traditions give answer to unasked question , do not rush to disobey your traditions.

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As I always tell my parents and extended family:

"To hell with tradition/culture, my culture is objectivity and reasoning".

I think through issues and respond based on the best approach not what Yoruba's are suppose to do or usually do.

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I think that it is important that you hold on to your traditions.

They tend to set a set of standards that are lacking in the Western world.

When we were kidnapped and brought to America we were stripped of our language and our traditions, therefore sending us into a tail spin. We were given the white mans traditions and value system which was in direct conflict with what is inherently DNA coded in us. This left the kidnap victims lost and without a stable value and moral system, thus leaving us in the state we are in today.

I say dont turn your back on your traditions but embrace them and keep them and pass them on.

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No problem. Glad I could help clear it up.

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much more clearer thanks

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What I mean is that tradition is how things are done, not why. There is no underlying meaning in anything I said. I'm impartial as to the 'goodness' or 'evilness' of tradition, because the 'goodness' and 'evilness' of tradition is dependent upon those who use/manipulate it. So don't expect me to say that some traditions are bad, or some are good, and we should do this to the bad ones and the that to the good ones, etc. etc. All I'm saying is that tradition is how a group of people do things. So, by the same token, people decide what makes up their tradition and what doesn't. That's all. I'm only stating what tradition is, and trying to help you understand why Africans take it seriously.

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Take and adhere to the ones that are good for u and ignore the rest.simple really !

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No point in keeping traditions that favor everyone but you.

As I have said in a previous thread, those who shout tradition is tradition are obviously making some benefits from them. Let them "tradition" themselves. I am not interested.

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i sense that your major problem with tradition is with the boldened. Marry a man who doesn't mind you not doing what he wants. There's really no problem in life except for the ones we try to create when we want others to do what are doing or to be like us.

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Tradition is actually an institution that favours a society at large or some clique. But most often, if u dig deep enough, you will realise that most of our time-honoured norms is actually for the benefit of a few i.e the male folks, priests, council of elders, royal family etc.

Let tradition give way to the principles of natural justice (a higher moral law) which abhors human sacrifice, blood letting etc., or utilitarian principle which guarantees the happiness of the greates number.

Chikenah.

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Honestly, I'm not really sure how best to reply to your post. . . I guess the much I can say is that, tradition is our way of life. It is how we distinguish ourselves from others (identity-wise). It is what makes Igbo different from Yoruba, or Hausa different from Efik. It is what makes Japanese people different from Koreans, and Bushmen different from Englishmen. . . the list can go on. Tradition is more about identity than need. Need is usually individualistic, but tradition is how a group of people organize, govern, and otherwise, identify themselves (that is why Africans take it seriously). I agree with your father, "tradition is tradition". I'll also add that it belongs to the people. So, the people decide what makes up their traditions.

We love our country because it is our motherland, the way we show our love is often governed by tradition.

We love our parents because they brought us up, the way we show we love and respect them is often governed by tradition.

We get married because of love (questionable 4-letter word), but the way we marry, is often goverened by tradition.

Tradition is how we do things, not why we do them.

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