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Why Do White People Get Scared Of The African Americans?

I have noticed this so much in my school,they find it very difficult to insult them and they act in an inferior way.

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I've often wondered why AAs are surprised considering that they're way over represented in the crime stats.

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you are more scared of them than they are of you dear.

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not all.

some white folks will let you know upfront that they don't like you.

others will pretend not to and practically walk on eggshells trying to be politically correct.

and then you have some that genuinely like/admire AAs.

It's the same in every race.

skin color is one thing but really it should be about character as it's all the same mentalities everywhere you go.

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That is very true

maybe because they believe black people are violent in nature.

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I was at work once and my colleague who was white was like Damn your people are scary as hell. Lol I asked him why, and he said because you have been called pirates, terrorists, pimps, prostitutes, murderurs, psychos and many more just in the past five years. I got mad for a minute, but then realized the man was absolutely right!. So I told him hey at least wer doing something. Lol

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Racism goes both ways here. I know some white people who feel it is okay to say backwards comments about Black People. I have even ended 2 friendships over it. In general though most people who feel that way keep it to themselves. I have been married to a black men (2nd marriage) for 15 years and have never once had any problems with wayward comments from any white people. Nor has my husband ever had any problems with racism. HOWEVER, the worst racism I have encountered has been from Black Women (AA). They seem to feel free to say whatever they want about my being with a man from their race. If we go out dancing I already know I will be getting crazy looks & pushed on the dance floor. One called me a cracker & they will not hesitate to hit on my husband right in front of me. Of course this is not all Black Women by any means, my point is just that it goes both ways. It is a hard pill to swallow I used to answer back but I learned long ago that there is nothing I will say to make them change their minds, so I just smile at them & wish them to find happiness of their own.

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I've met a couple of older people who have told me stories of growing up in those times. It may be more obvious in the South but its still very prevalent in the North. Although people here may be more accepting, there are still some who tend to act as though it doesn't exist [mostly white people]. For example, my brother goes to a semi-specialized predominantly white school in Manhattan which has a reputation for having a students who often times stupidly and openly display they're underhanded racist views. I used to have friend from my brothers school and the people I knew from that school used to make racist comments and try to laugh it off because they felt that because they had black and hispanic friends that it was ok. I remember when I was a senior in high school and my school had a tournament at a predominantly white and asian high school in the Bronx. While at the tournament, three of my team mates went for a walk around the school [which we were free to do] and while going on this walk, they were stopped my the principal of the school and were bombarded with questions. They were eventually escorted to the principals office by a security guard/officer and questioned for several minutes. When he [the principal] realized that they weren't students of the school and that they were just visiting for the tournament, he was embarrassed and tried to play it off by saying he didn't question them because they were black and hispanic. In an attempt to try to smooth things over, he even said "I wasn't trying to being racist, my wife is black". I was like "Wtf, so that makes it ok huh?"

There was also another time when I was trying to get to a hotel for a banquet that being held and I asked a white police officer he knew where it was. The dude barely waited for me to ask my question before he said no. As I turned to walk away, a white girl walked up to him and asked him for directions to the same hotel and he pointed her in the direction of the hotel. Trust me, the racism here isn't as discreet as people think. There are a bunch of other events that have occurred while I was at other tournaments in other northern states. I will admit though things are really bad in the south.

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Inked_Nerd,

You haven't seen nothing. lol My grandfather who is African American from North Carolina used to tell me about living in the Jim Crow South. The stories he used to tell me when I was younger about the lynchings and how the whites disrespected black daily; it can make you cry.

Whites in the North are not blatant racist. But whites in the South are far from afraid of blacks. Many actually miss being in charge of blacks.

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Gee, that's funny given the fact that they have done their fair share of violent acts all over the world.

@OP: Its all based on racism. There's always the belief/notion that all black people are the same. I was once at a Chinese restaurant with a group people [mostly black] and there was a white man with family. The moment we walked into the restaurant, the man's eyes widened. We were seated next to the white man and his family. For a couple of seconds, the man and his wife stared at us and although their food was still being given to them, he quickly gathered his wife and son and left the restaurant. When my white friend looked at me then whispered to me, "What a racist!!! Look at how just he up and left because he saw some black people." I've got a bunch of other stories similar to that one a well.

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I have always wondered the same thing. One day I was going for one of my walks minding my own business. I had to cross the street and ended having to walk in front of this older white lady's car. As I walked across the street I heard her doors lock. I just looked at her and shook my head. From what I have been told white people think that we are violent people.

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