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Pidgin in Secondary School, Is It Right?

Nigerian Secondary Schools use pidgin to teach, most especially public schools. Is this right?

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If they will learn better that way ,i dont see any reason why it should not be used as a means of instruction,

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I don't know of any secondary schools in Nigeria where students are being taught in Pidgin. Definitely not in the southwest.

I can imagine a teacher trying to deliver a chemistry lesson using only pidgin! I am happy for my kids to pick up pidgin in the community, not in school.

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I dont see any wrong with that. In south africa, the white people made up their own language and called it Afrikano despite it is collection of European languages and imposed it on the real black africans and now it is wide range used no matter the origin or the colour of the speaker.

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Hi, just to let know that pigin is not welcome in our high schools ,it does not sound well or proper blowing pilgil either while in class or school premises since is not accerpted as one of the official languages in school you are blessed.http//coolcashjackpot.net/ref=bums_ins

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In truth i don't see why ebonics cannot be an official language. If it has syntax and rules, game on. We be blowin', mama be back lol.

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In the mid 90's, some black Americans wanted Ebonics (black american english) to be there official language thank goodness, it didn't  happen. Naija una won follow.

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colonial mentalityy anyone?

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Some people are missing the drift, who said pidgin is our local language? who made it one?

Teaching Igbo, Hausa or Yoruba are acceptable

But pidgin, hell no and do not see why any reasonable or educated person will give in to that.

What exactly do u want to impact into students or scholars? leaving me wondering

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NO. Makes no sense unless it is a pidgin english class.

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@ topic. Absolutely no. It is absurd. Remember, pidgin english is actually broken english. It is okay to communicate at a lower level, but not for teaching at secondary school level

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In fact I would suggest the language "pidgin english" be clearly documented as a unique language. Educationists if d word dey for english should consider setting up d structure of the language including grammar, sentence construction and spelling, and could be taught in schools as a Nigerian Language together with Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo.

I was arguing with my friend the other day how to write "my pikin dey come" or "my pickin they come". We still haven't come to an agreement. There are no rules to d language and as such cannot be accepted as a distinct language. By teaching the language in school, we would better appreciate it.

I dont see anything wrong in studying in pidgin english, or even working in a company with pidgin english. No matter how much we claim to be very fluent in English Language and most of us even claim English as a first language, e get some kain things that are better expressed with pidgin. Our feelings and emotions are gradually getting subdued all in d name of speaking oyinbo man language. For example, babe go understand wen I say "I feel u die" than saying "I have the hots for u". Most of my innermost feelings and desires are better expressed in pidgin.

I was wondering the other day if there are any novels or storybooks written in pidgin english. We dont even have a national newspaper that is written in pidgin english. Na wa oh. . . I guess we can start from there.

Play play play play I don talk plenty forget to answer the main question for the thread.

@ Poster Pidgin in Secondary School, Is It Right? Yes.

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Your grasp of standard British English is suspect as shown by your spelling and punctuation errors. This would not be noticeable if we as Nigerians had our own dialect of the English language that is indigenous to us. Many countries have their own dialect different from the standard BE and many youngsters have this informal English we speak in Nigeria as their native language. So I do not think it is out of place to use this means to help a child understand a topic of discussion better.

Rather than scream blue murder, we should see how we can work round this situation and try to produce a standardised version of this language that can be used in formal settings.Everyone knows how easy it is to understand better if spoken to in your native tongue.

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it already part of our culture that haas even strech beyond seconday schools. let roll with it,at least i will make naija unique

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This should not be allowed in our schools please! Only illitrates - who missed out on basic education would support this lazy idea so don't even bother with the crap topic.

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Be specific! Which Nigerian secondary schools teach with pidgin english? Which state? Stop generalising whenever you are talking and stop abusing this country, try to make a good and specific point.

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@ poster, what is the positioning of english in the context of nigerian language answer that question first

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yes, student should speak quuen's english in secondary school and the university.

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You all said it all, why we go dey run from our language, Na brton colonize Hong kong yet them still dey speak theri language, I just belive say na mental slavery dey worry some Nigerian,

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It is perfectly okay and should be encouraged. Hausa, Yoruba and Ibo should even be used.

A long time ago, there was this kid in my GCE centre. I asked him for clarification of some things but he couldn't explain. As soon as he noticed my name, he started speaking in Yoruba. If you see the way this guy perfectly explained Organic Chemistry in Yoruba, you go bow.

Research as shown that students grab information easily in their local dialect/most used language.

A lot of people speak local languages at home. English is just a language and should not be seen as a mode of becoming "literate"

Countries like Japan, Germany and most french colonies teach in their languages.

Local languages should be encouraged as a mode of teaching while English should be taught as what it is supposed to be - a language.

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Pidgin is our slang. So what's wrong with students using it?

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While it is a tad strange given the circumstance of Pidgin English being a wrong version of the English language. The 're-branding' minister can use her time to work towards producing a standard version of this distinctive Nigerian language that somewhat unites all of us and IS the native language to many children of the low to middle class families in the major cities of Nigeria.

Even in London, new versions of the language are accepted as dialects and are standardised (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multicultural_London_English)

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National Policy on Education states that, in addition to English, the major Language in the student's environment could be used.

Therefore, the evidence of codification and elaboration of functions and the partial or technical acceptance of Nigerian Pidgin is clearly visible.

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pidgin is ok, it should be used!

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