«Home

Do Nigerians Appreciate Subtlety In Movies?

A friend of mine got into arguments with some fellow filmmakers who told him that subtlety in a movie can't work for Nigerians. According to his friends, "if you don't tell them what you mean, they'll miss the message."

My response:

It's true that most Nigerians don't appreciate subtlety. They are intelligent, but calibrated differently. They are like Italians - if you don't raise your voice then you're not serious about whatever you are saying. One can assume that a Nigerian inside or outside a movie will always say what's on her mind in a direct manner. Otherwise she doesn't mean it. If you don't scream, you are not angry. If you don't roll on the floor and wail, you are not bereaved.

I think it's a cultural thing. I think the Mexicans are just like us, which is why their soap operas are doing really well on Nigeria TV. (The Hausas, bless their gentle hearts, are very different from Yorubas and Igbos in this regard!)

Avatar
Newbie
45 answers

I've long stopped watching Nigerian movies. Well, apart from Tunde Kelani's. For one thing there aren't that many good Nigerian actors. The point's been made that home videos target a certain audience, and I guess Nigerian actors  figure method acting as too hard to learn, and too subtle for us to appreciate. I watch a movie for its dialogue, its beauty and the power of its performances. That's why The English Patience remains my most affecting movie experience. The more intelligent Nigerian actors employ their intelligence in carrying a role, but they've no passion for their art, and with art, passion is everything. That's why foreign actors starve themselves, change their diet, undergo a rigorous physical regimen, for the sake of their art. They would do almost anything for it. Here, it's all about the pay packet. I watched Rinko Kikuchi's performance in Babel (That year's best supporting actress oscar should have gone to her or Adriana Barraza). She portrayed a deaf-mute, and managed to convey a myriad of complex emotions, without saying a word. When are Nigerian actors going to give us that pleasure? And the stuff's in us. They harp on about how Nollywood is the third largest film industry in the world. What the hell does that  mean? Nigerian films are poor in almost every respect. If there were good dialogue I'd take the poor sound,editing and technical production- a good movie costs megabucks to produce- but there's no incentive to watch them at all. So I don't. Except for Kelanis.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Example of the Professionals (in Hollywood) in action

0
Avatar
Newbie

I quite agree wit u guys dat d movies been produced now in Nigeria are nothing 2 write home about. Apart from d display of non-professionalism in their productions, their story line (plot) is also poor in which u can always predict d ending even @ d very start of d film. Repetition of storyline is d order of d day as almost all movies ve d same concept, plot, theme, subjects & story base. Most of them as u guys said earlier are there just 4 d money and not 4 d love n passion for d work. The list is endless n it is obvious 2 everyone including d layman dat Nollywood has a long way 2 go. Even, lets talk about d impact n effect d films ve on d general audience. It is so apparent dat deir movies has succeeded in promoting & adding more 2 d societal decay in many ways i won't like 2 go into now.

The real issue now is, who are dose 2 revive dis dying industry? Already, we ve great filmmakers who ve stand dier ground n maintained dier Professionalism despite d odds in d industry. This great filmmakers include d greatest cinematography, Tunde Kilani of Mainframe Productions and d best filmmaker not only in Nigeria, but d whole of Africa, talking of d man who sustains d record of winning awards in almost all his film productions, talkin of Tade Ogidan of OGD Pictures. Both have succeeded in proving a point n making movies dat will install moral values n b of immense benefit to d society n d world @ large.

To cut d long story short, dis two great men has showcased 2 d world dat dis is wat dey enjoy doing n ve passion 4 not 4 d sole purpose of moneymaking. And as Princesa has said, it definately won't b long for d real professionals 2 come on board n take over.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I commend the discussion in here, I loved it, very matured. I am a lover of Naija home videos too, and each time I summon enough courage to watch one, my usual sense of trying to figure out what is wrong with the movies always come in play. By the time I spend around 30 minutes on the movie, I must have seen one or two things that will pissed me off, sometimes, I let it go and proceed to finish watching the movie, sometimes, I ran out of gas to finish it.

Truth is, as long as the fate of our home videos is in the hands of people who are out to make profit without thinking of bringing good product out of their movies, we are in for a long shoddy movie business. I keep wondering when the people who loved movie business will take over the reign of the industries, by then, to me, would be the time when movies will be produced in this country with great finesse.

How many of ou rproducer has time to sampled the opinion of viewers before producing movies? How many of our producers have time to research into movies they want to produce? Little, We all witnessed the way Seun solicit consumers views on films in here, and how he seeks opinions, has there been any of our producers doing same? There is no even an avenue to do that? I am still waiting for the time when movie business will be in the hands of those who love movies, producing it for the love of it. Someone said earlier on about bright chaps with good vision who had taken over the music industry, it is because they love what they do, and I can see that, before long same will happen to movie business.

I hate to add two and two together while watching movies, no wonder I love to watch most of my American movies fully subtitled, so I know what exactly they are talking about, I love to know what everyone said words for words, by that way, I know what the movie is all about. Does that means a Nigerian like me appreciate Subtlety In Movies?

0
Avatar
Newbie

Tell them is understating it, you have to hit them over the head with it, hoping the head will break open and you can now stuff it in there. It used to piss me when I'm watching a movie and they are doing this expositions soooo gba gba like that. I'm thinking in my head. . .

"Okay, they know we're not silly right? They have got to know when we see a gunshot wound, we know it's from a gun and we don't need them to tell us it's from a gun".

Then one day, I sat through a Nigerian movie with some older Nigerian women and I finally understood why the actors have to say

"I will open this door now and enter it. This door, not that one. . . this particular one I'm standing in front of and touching now"

Guess they know their audience and that's a good thing I suppose.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Nigerian actors always have to open their eyes wide, wag their heads like there's no tomorrow, beat their chests like its a tom tom drum and speak out loud even when alone. The one that i hate most is when housemaids eavesdrop. Its painful to watch. The wide open mouth while peeping through the keyhole, exaggerated tip toeing and the clapping of hands. AAAAAARRGHHHHHH!

0
Avatar
Newbie

I've not really had the time to check all what everybody had to say. Seun, from what I've read, it seems to me like you have a lot of faith in the fate of Nollywood. It's all I can do not to totally give up hope. When sometimes I find myself in the position to watch one of those abominable movies, thinking that something better might crop up, I find out that it's worse than the last time. So much for faith.

Te problems these film makers have here can be summarised thus, in my opinion at least;

-They actually think it's an eternity to input 3 months for a project-I actually heard Shan George complaining that a movie was taking too long. What's too long? 2 weeks! Unbelieva f**king ble!!!!!

-The freaking pirates are better marketers than the makers of the crap themselves! How do explain a movie made and copies are being made before the movie's 'officially' out!

-They're solely content with making 'Home Videos'. That can never be good for any industry. But I guess even the nollywood advocates will not be willing to pay a couple of hundred bucks for any movie. Therefore they don't input anything. Garbage in, garbage out!

-They claim to be 'smart' when you confront them with the question why do you seem to target the dumbest of senile people with your screenplay, they'll retort the majority brings in the doe.

-Nobody's asking for a giant leap into sci-fi or amazing special effects. All we're asking is for a good story. Is that too much to ask for?

-Their stories seem to always be a recycled story formerly told or a remake (lowly budget) of a simple Hollywood movie they saw and thought 'I can do that'

-There is this little annoying fact! They think this industry is supposed to be a preaching media or a moral instruction class. Nobody's averse to a morally inclined story but you don't have to rub it in our faces all the time. The point is entertainment, not minitrainment.

-The most valid reason is probably the fact that these movies come out virtually at 30 per week, averaging like 4 per day. And it's not like there are many producers, it's just that each one makes too many, too quick. How then, I ask, can they be any good, huh?

-I could go on and on, but the bottomline is that these people don't cut it, but unfortunately they rule this business. I await a revolution similar to what I see in the Music scene, which really makes me proud to be a Nigerian. As for nollywood, I'm shamed!

0
Avatar
Newbie

i had 2 movies, a local and a foreign one. i chose to watch the nigerian one because i was tired. i didnt want to think. i knew even if i fell asleep in the middle and woke up at the end, i'ld still undertsnad the whole movie. and, i was right. they are very predictable and it doesnt take a genius to figure out the next scene.

we need a total overhauling in the industry.

correct me if i'm wrong. . . I'VE NOT SEEN A NIGERIAN MOVIE THAT GOT ME THINKING.!!!! have you?

0
Avatar
Newbie

synopsis?

You guys are crediting the home video industry-which is comprised of some informed professionals and loads of uninfromed people- with a great of knowledge.

At the risk of sounding crude, the industry is still being seen by the people who have given themselve the right to be its leaders more as a commodity market than marketing highly creative and well thought out projects.

Come to Folwuyo Bankole Street in surulere where the popular winnis Hotel( Home viedo personnel hangout) is and you will have an idea why our home video industry really needs truly creative people in all its ramifications.

0
Avatar
Newbie

because if you read the synopsis, you'll get the not so subtle message the film is about, basically they write the whole story on the jacket most of the time!

even the synopsis is well spelt out you wont need to watch the film

0
Avatar
Newbie

neva understood why they dont write the synopsis on the jacket

0
Avatar
Newbie

Subtlety is not valued in our culture. That doesn't mean we can't appreciate good movies, but it means that our definition of what is good in a movie is different. Different, not inferior. Some good Nigerian movies are being produced, but they are not being promoted especially well. The movie buyer can't differentiate between good movies and bad ones: the producers can't even be bothered to write the synopsis on the jacket!! But why?

0
Avatar
Newbie

I don't buy that whole idea that moives are made for house wives so there is no economic need for improvement. I think we need to subscribe to the Las Vegas philosophy: "If you build it they will come". Balogun used to be the house wife's choice for shopping but since The Palms has been opened, house wives flood Shoprite everyday buying the same things they have been buying for years. The fact that a standard is accepted does not mean it should not be improved; it just means you can continue to exploit consumers until someone shows them better.

I don't think you should even ask if Nigerians appreciate subtlety in Movies. As human beings, we appreciate subtlety everyday in communication with our fellow people so why do you think that will not translate to the movies?

Having said this, I read down the responses and it seems someone has said some part of what I am saying in some different way but that only proves the point. Maybe if we repeat ourselves over and over again we would finally hear.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I have faith in our capacity to do more. yesterday, I Stayed up late to watch a Nigerian musical programme and I was so impressed with the improvement that has occurred in that sub sector of our entertainment industry.The videos that I saw can compete with so many we see on channel o and MTV.Simply because they used those channels as benchmark.

Seun said something about the absence of competition and I couldn't agree more. We only need the people who have done these wonders to musical videos to take their skill into the movie genre and we will see improvement.Me think that is what is going to happen soonest, when bright and intelligent creative people will take over our film/home video industry deploying quality thoughts and personnel that all of us Hollywood buffs will have to take notice.

0
Avatar
Newbie

The actors were not banned because tehy were poor?

And how can they even improve in nigeria its not like they can go back to some drama school in nigeria after all their experience

Its the directors and producers/writers thats should improve! most of the actors are good enough for nigeria films

0
Avatar
Newbie

Competition in business naturally leads to improvement in the quality of the product or service beng rendered. If the industry is not improving, then competition must have been stiffled somewhere along the line. Let's monitor the various trade bodies, labor unions and government regulators closely and we would find the source of the problem. Example: sometime ago, some actors were banned. Instead of being busy improving, they were busy sitting at home.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@paddy_lo

you hit the nail on the head

we tend to watch for nostalgia

The real issue is that a minority of us apppreciate subtlety, the rest are perfectly fine with how most films are produced now. Even the works (including stage plays) that are good, are not as popular as the mass market productions. Marketers are interested in volumes of sales not in critics

Honestly, I feel there's more subtlety when we stick to our local language

0
Avatar
Newbie

@paddy_lo

I think I get your point but that will be more subjective from the individual posters than a general perception. My opinion is shaped by the era that preceded the home video rush;the more expensive and professional celluloid era where The Ogunde's and Eddie Ugboma help sway. If they can be that disciplined to accomodate subtlety and other rationale disposition that makes films watchable, the people in our age should do more. Now, I am not talking of format-whether celluloid of digital- here cos that will be another issue altogether but pure artistic imagination.the type we read in our plays, where 'suspension of disbelief' is expected in works of art.

I do not belief that the movies are created for cultural reasons.It sound like a very convenient excuse.At the level of editing, even takes that are otherwise okay have been known to be taken off to give the 'work' (and this is how any finished work of creativity should be seen) a wholesome look and appeal.

I think that much of the films that are the subject of this discourse have been produced and put together by people lacking in this skills.WE have taught much of west and sub saharan Africa that we dont wait on granst from the EU to produce celluloid based films and we can take over with videos that are more effective given the economy of our region.My point and cry is that we make some impact with the cotent too!

IN the university, I watched loads of plays and I am friends with many performers.I am familiar with teh amount of work that goes into a production.What I see most times when I am forced to watch is a mockery of true acting.

Many Nigerians love to watch their Home video out of nostalgia raher than a pure desire to see a great film.I may be wrong but that is what I have noticed.The point is that we are able to do much more.We have given the world great people in literature and other forms of art, we have enough from our rich minds to generate contents for our films, if we start by telling ourselves that we are not there yet!

it is then and only then that our films can reach more people and earn several times what is earned now.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@paddy_lo,

The audience may not be silly,but it is obviously lazy. Are you suggesting that we need to have events we have just watched repeated to us twice in the space of 15 minutes? Your saying that the movie is tailored to the audience simply reinforces the position being put forward.

I have travelled to many parts of Africa myself and am pleasantly surprised to see how much people take to those movies. In fact I've seen French dubbed over versions of Nigerian home videos where only one voice is used for all the characters in the whole 1 1/2 hr "blockbuster", from start to finish. Better believe it. And they simply love it. Does the fact that people love them automatically make them top quality work? All we are simply saying is they should just try a little harder to be convincing that's all.

With regards to subtlety and our culture, I seem to recall a common Yoruba saying with words to the effect that, you don't have to say some things with "all of your mouth". If that is not a cultural allusion to subtlety, then please tell me what it is.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@Gidig

well what i get from the author and others on this thread is a suggestion that Nigerians are kind of silly not to be able to understand subtletys,or perhaps that the producers do not westernize the production enough.

well i will tell you that that is like going to an indian and asking him,Do Indians understand the importance of dialogue and conversating in Movies or are they just all about singing and dancing?. . or maybe ask if Indians are romantic? Just because they don't kiss on screen. .u see the indian movies work for the local audience,they would not give a damn about what hollywood thinks or whomever for that matter. . .that is my point we make movies for our audience,and they know what the audience wants. .maybe there could be some improvement on technology or lighting or whatever,but if the plot is uniquely african i think its ok,for me at least.

when i watch a Nigerian movie,i expect to laugh relax and just have fun. . .i know i am not watching a hollywood blockbuster,neither do i want that either in my Nigerian movie. . .its about my culture,my people,our way of talking,dancing,romancing. . .whateva.peace.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I think the issue is not really that people trash Nollywood. There should be a degree of improvement over the past few years.We really can't stay at this 'we are the next big thing ' bus stop and seek progress.what I hear mostly about the home video industry in Nigeria is all about how big it is and not the quality of the production.

practitioners must demand and implement very high standards.In the music industry for example, you will notice that there are lots of improvement in production of videos and even the music because some of the practitioners know that they now have to compete with artistes from all over the world.we are evolving no doubt. But much of the home video industry has been static in terms of development. We really must thank God that it creates job for people  but the content and the quality thereof is appalling. based on the examples I have given about the music industry where competition has created better videos, what the people who control the industry should be is to embrace other professional who will help bring some quality into their production.

This may necessarily mean longer time in production and more standards from casts and crew but it will make our films better.Ifyou have a storyline that iinvolves lawyers, get some lawyer to consult on the script; get copywriters to title the films;get graphic designers to iinterpret your theme in good posters-not the nearest business center Of course this means more money but it also means more coverage in terms of demography.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@Everyone

You see "a prophet is never recognized at home",while you guys are busy castigating Nigerian films,i will have u note that outside our shores it is the most popular genre of movies in countries like kenya,ghana,liberia,sierra leone,south africa and so on. . .here in the states most Africans that i have visited have stacks of Nigerian films at home,my liberian friend tells me how his wife loves them and is always eager to question me on Nigerian culture and what not,which he professes to love(go figure. . ).

My point is that,we are africans we have a distinct culture,be it african time,be it being overdramatic,maybe for yorubas prostrating on the floor to greet,or whatever it is. . .you cannot wake up one morning and wish away your culture(God forbid, )

American movies do have a lot of trash too(snakes on a plane, )for instance,and American movies are pretty much whitewashed,something i did not really understand until i moved here,65% of the roles are written for white males. . (of course we have asians,blacks and latinos who together make up 40% of the population,but when last did u see them in lead roles male or female?)now most Africans and black people who want to relate to Africa,do value those Nigerian movies that u so trash. .also hollywood has never really bothered to do anything positive on Africa. . .from blood diamonds to constant gardener,its the same bullshit. . .Africa is given such bad press over here in the west that sometimes i have to shake myself just not to believe all the trash. . even though i lived in Nigeria for 20yrs of my life. .

So if u enjoy Nigerian movies keep doing so,if u trash it please be realistic. .we are the only ones that can blow our trumpets.

critics are welcome.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I will agree to a very large extent with the view that most of these Nigerian Home videos are targeted at people who have accepted a compromise in what should have been called quality television or film production.

I am only thankful to God that the industry has created jobs for many people in Nigeria.I do not own any Nigerian VCD or DVD even though I own loads of foreign films. (though I intend to collect all TK's works this New year break) Until recently when someone said I was being too hard, I has a theory that If one watches too much Naija videos, it is usually an indication of a very low IQ (A theory, I said).I simply cant imagine the mental torture one will have to go through watching any of the many films that are manufactured daily.

I live in a part of Lagos where I have limited access to some of these producers and Directors and To be very frank with you, there is no way they are going to produce a better film.They just stumbled on 'this industry' and decided to settle down. Not much thinking is done and not much is manifest in the films produced.

The fact that what should be deduced by the viewer is explained( and some times used as sound track/commentary) is not in appreciation of the viewers but a deficiency on the part of the movie makers. I have been used as an extra in a movie without my consent as cybercafe in Bode Thomas by a director who felt everyone in the cafe will be glad to be in his movie. AS we went about our business , cameras were placed all around us and we all came to feature in that film.

There are a few good films out there I believe.I just don't have the time to find them.I have limited my 'must see' to TUnde Kelani; 'tolerate to 'Tade Ogidan and Amaka Igwe'; 'if you have time to kill -Charles Novia!

0
Avatar
Newbie

Don't bother. It's the mental equivalent of self flagellation.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Fortunately or unfortunately, i don't watch 9ja movies, it bores me to death and always seem to lack objectivity

0
Avatar
Newbie

I totally agree with you on this. It's like they dont get that no one does the whole "let me read what the letter says outloud" crap anymore. Usually by the next scene you should know what exactly was in that letter. They dont even do that in Yoruba movies. I usually watch Nollywood movies with my sister so we can make fun of everything. Seriously it's hilarious.

It's sad that they think people need everything done upfront cos they are supposedly "too silly" to eventually get what's happening. tsk

0
Avatar
Newbie

@ osegwu:

God would bless you for what you just said!

Nollywood producers need to be shot in the foot.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Our producers and editors drserve to be

flogged.

still me

0
Avatar
Newbie

@iice

you can say that again. they think viewers are dumb and everything has to be spelt out in details before we can understand.

i was watching an american movie a week ago. in a scene, a guy's fone rings. he picks it up. end of scene. the next scene, we see him in a restaurant with a lady and she says "thanks for seein me on such short notice". immediately we all understood that she called him to meet her at the restaurant. alot of time was saved. but if it were to be naija directors, the lady would spell out the address of the restaurant. they 'll show the guy going to his car and drivin to the restaurant!!!!

we need to change our orientation,

0
Avatar
Newbie

This is not to lambash Nigerian movies, but after watching pretty much any Nigerian movie for 5 minutes, I can tell u who will die, and how the person will die, and who would suffer and even how it would end. Soo predictable. Nigerians love that.

0
Avatar
Newbie

comechop i disagree with your analysis, only bush nigerians don't understand the subtle nature of american films. i think we even understand it better than our nigerian films. If a film is subtle it also has to be interesting. Lets face facts nigerians are not the most calm people on earth. We/Nigerians have greater tendencies to dramatize/overdo what we're feeling (not only in movies). To say the least am not supporting overdramatization of actions. I totally support subtilyty in movies, i feel it might teach nigerians calmness when necessary.

0
Avatar
Newbie

. . .And then, what is the essence of entertainment if subtlety is not appreciated? Don't get me wrong, movies are NOT all about subtlety but then, subtlety are integral and they're a useful and clever way of passing messages across to the audience.

But then, our countrypeople and housewives aplenty don't appreciate and understand metaphors and take everything literally.

@ Orikinla:

lol, why don't you like discussing OmoT? Is there an emotional attachment of sorts? And i also believe she is a way better actress than Genevieve.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Lol, if subtelity is introduced in any movies, most Nigerians wont catch it. Thats why even Nigerians that watch american movies dont get anything from it, the jokes, the plot, the subtle lines, or anything. Its kinda sad, but its the truth. We prefer it to be OPEN and THERE.

0
Avatar
Newbie

What baffles me more is, if these producers don't have editors

who edit their scripts and actions. Imagine watching a movie

set in the early 40s with the women wearing weavon when

they knew outrightly that at that period there was nothing like

weavon or some body who is jobless for God knows how long

only for himto get a job and in the next 2 months is living in a six

bedroom Duplexand driving a BMW 7 series. its pathetic and the

audience rushesthese movies cos they know no better even the

Bollywood is doing better. Christ save our movie industry.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Gbade,

A professional double was used for Omo Sexy's role when she had to play the steamy parts.

Omo Sexy is married away.

I saw her last in 1996. The last encounter was when she handed an orange to me like Eve offering the Forbidden Fruit to Adam. But this was whilst we were at the rehearsals of a movie with Regina Askia, Emeka Ike, Ejike Asiegbu, Segun Arinze, Rachael Oniga and others. But, I often avoid threads on Omotola Ekeinde for my own good reasons.

I actually respect her more than Genevieve Nnaji.

The role that shot her to limelight was Mortal Inheritance.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I doubt it. Nollywood movies are full of sh*t and the Producers and housewives actually relish in that sh*t.

Orikinla,

about that stark Unclad thingy. What about "The Prostitute" (starring Omotola) back then? She and some dude were rutting and having a few pokes stark Unclad on the bed. Movie sold like sh*t and was accepted despite OmoT's unclothedness

0
Avatar
Newbie

Have you watched Conspiracy featuring Onyeka Onwenu?

Have you watched RMD's Out of Bounds?

Have you watched Tade Ogidan's Abiku?

Have you watched Jimi Odumosu's Evil Encounter?

The Nollywood producers and marketers don't really care about our elitist and intellectual views. Because, as I mentioned earlier they are making their B movies for the housewives and their fellow traders and families and relations.

I am watching a Spanish film now and there is a pretty young woman in coma.

So, the medical doctor and nurses have to change her dresses and they showed her Coverless and when she had her period, they cleaned her up. And they have to wash her hair and even cut her hair while she was still in coma.

It is a very poetic film with Spanish songs and bull fights used as metaphors of life.

This is the kind of serious films we should be making now.

But I have problems with most of the so called educated Nigerians.

Because, if I show a Coverless nubile girl bathing, they will be alarmed.

But if I show a Coverless nursing mother breastfeeding her baby, that will be acceptable?

I am still trying to make a film where the lead actress will bathe stark Unclad in the twilight by the sea side on Bonny Island. But I am wondering what my pastors and brethren will think.

Are we ready for the reality in the subtlety of genre movies?

0
Avatar
Newbie

Few nigerians wu apreciat subtlety r nt intrested in nollywood film n its same story. I watch more of hollywood. Nigerian films r ful of s**t.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I do.

Personally, I'll really welcome more subtlety in movies. We have to realise that the Nigerian Movie audience is a very wide one. Some people love the English home videos, some prefer the Yoruba ones, others the Mexican soaps while others can't wait to go to the Cinemas to see a well-made Hollywood movie. Hence, I guess the target of the subtle movies will mainly be those people that appreciate good acting Hollywood-style.

For me the only Nigerian movies that have consistently hit the minimum quality mark for me are Tunde Kelani's movies. Despite Tade Ogidan's many attempts, I always find something just not right about the casting, the acting or the storyline.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Subtlety? Yeah right, subtlety my Bottom!! Sorry Orikinla, i gotta disagree on this one. True, the primary target of these slow Nollywood movies are housewives, the messages in the movies are always clear, cut, dried, direct, linear and straightforward. No subtelty of any kind. Their soundtracks and adverts say it all. How the flaming f can subtlety be achieved when everything about a movie is said in the advert and soundtrack? Which subtlety is there? With the amount of stereotypes and recycled storylines and clichés, how can there be subtlety?

0
Avatar
Newbie

They do.

Even the Nigerian housewives who are the primary target of Nollywood movie makers appreciate subtlety in movies.

0
Avatar
Newbie

No comment.

Life goes on.

0
Avatar
Newbie
Your answer
Add image

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.