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No More Igbo Movies: Why?

My intention is not to start the new year on a tribalistic note - abegi, it is 2008 and time for Nigerians to wake up and smell the coffee, but I have a question

a) Are Igbo movies still being produced in Nigeria. Everywhere I turn, there are Yoruba movies in Yoruba language, I can't find Igbo movies in Igbo language, what is up with that?

Well, apart from slave warrior which kicked Bottom- (great movie, must see),

So what is going on?

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Is it that Igbo people prefer to produce movies in other languages outside of theirs?

Or is the Igbo movie just not marketable?

If the second is the case - why is it?

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99 answers

My number is 08036683603, tanks.

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I'm an Igbo movie producer, I'll like you guys to know that the marketers are the major problem that is demoting Igbo movies to day. Yah! Because we do packaged some good stuffs that gats all it takes to represents at eny competitive and needed time, but the marketers doesn't appreciates them enymore, so, no producer will like to produce a film that no marketer will buy.

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So Igbo people enjoy the English Language a bit too much.

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The above post makes no sense whatsoever.

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Picture this scenario in your minds eye;A Yoruba job seeker goes to an office in bid of a job, he was hinted prior to the interview that the interviewer is a yoruba man and h enters the room greeting- EKARO SIR the response was reciprocated in yoruba language, same thing applies to a Hausa man man in same circumstance and he was replied in same language which he spoke(ina-kwana), in the case of an ibo man in the same circumstance this is the case

JOB SEEKER: Nwanne ndewo!

INTERVIEWER: Yes, may i help you?

How can he make an igbo movie when im never form yankee finish, haha- definitely not possible.Picture the likes of Jim iyke,segun arinze,chididi mokeme,stephanie okereke and the likes, i guess that answers your question,

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A very interesting thread,if one leaves out the tribalistic tirades.

There is not a doubt that using the english language is a big advantage in winning a wide audience base and making more money.Businesswise it makes more sense.Factum;english language is an ubiquitous language,and there is nothing anybody can do about that.

But somewhere down the line,questions will need to be asked whether sole profit consideration justifies the deliberate sidestepping of using indigenous tongues.

But like other posters have said,any moviemaking industry is mostly profitdriven and there is little anybody can do about that.

Investors will choose whatever options that will guarantee a very quick returns of their investment cash.And in the english speaking sector of nollywood,that investment cash volume is substantial,much more substantial than in the indigenous language sectors,and that includes yoruba movie sector.

That's the situation of nollywood,for now,atleast.

As for the subtitling,i believe that more people should be trained in subtitling skills.The yoruba sector,for example,do seems to grossly underestimate the importance of precision subtitling and how much it impacts on the audience.

But i am beginning to see improvements in this area because more and more yoruba movies are coming out with more competent subtitling.If a movie has a very good plot,it won't matter in what language the lines are delivered as long as the subtitling is pretty accurate,people will definitely sit down to follow the plot to the end.

Another point that needs to be emphasized on is the use or, maybe i should say,the overuse of spoken words in yoruba movies,for example.All nollywood flicks in any language are very verbal,relying almost exclusively on words to narrate the storyline with little or no use of actions,sounds,props,etc(visuals) to propel the movies' plots.

Now,while the english lang movies may not be - to a very large part - affected by this style of storytelling simply because they use a language that is ubiquitous(english) ,the indigenous lang movies are very disadvantaged,because the more they rely on spoken words,the more difficult it becomes to accurately subtitle them,and the more their viewership base shrinks.

So,in a nutshell,the only way for the indigenous lang sector of nollywood, like the yoruba movie sector, to compensate for the language disadvantage is to use the visual language more,meaning that they should cut down on the dialogues overload in their movies more and be much more visual.

The visual language is far more universal than english,and that is why it is better to "show it" than "talk it".

Every soul on this planet,who is not blind,understands what they see much more quickly than the spoken languages they hear.

Right now,the verbal/visual usage ratio in most yoruba flicks is about 90/10 in percentage in favour of the verbal.Give or take 5%.That is way way too high,IMO.Almost every scene is a damn conference with the actors just sitting around like logs and blabbing away!The "igboenglish" movies can get away with that,but not indigenous lang movie sectors like yoruba and igbo.

If verbal percentage can be cut down from 90% to say, under 60%,yoruba movies will be a lot easier to watch,follow,and understand by non-yoruba speaking audience.All that should,ofcourse, be supported with a very precise and professional subtitling.

The producers of igbo language movies can also take a cue from this suggestion,too.

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Acting and movies in general cuts through the language barrier. I watched Iche -Okwu (remember that Igbo court drama on old skool TV, with a funny interpreter - I hope my spelling is right) for long, without understanding a word of Igbo. If a movie is good, one doesn't really need to understand the language.

For goodness sake, someone needs to talk to the interpreters in Yoruba movies, make dem no kill man with big grammar.

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Jagunlabi, you do know this stuff. Good talk.

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My dear, i would have also asked this question long ago if i had the opportunity. I wish this question could be directed to the igbo movie producers cos it was fun then. I am Igbo and i don't like this at all.

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I am an igbo man,but i am not really happy because igbo movies are now difficult to get.It is not that we igbos dont value or respect our culture.The problem is that most of these producers and marketers are very greedy,they only want english movies so that they can make more money.

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The whole answer lies in the perceived marketability of igbo movies.

People stop insulting yourselves,

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, I'm still searching for the Igbo films though. Any answers?

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There are some movies made in Igbo Language but the marketers are not really keen on pushing them, so they end up in Pound road and Iweka road. I believe it was an experiment that got out of hand and it will be impossible to reverse it. Perhaps if they were persistent with the the production of Igbo language films just like Living in Bondage, Rattle Snake, Missing Mask and co, we wouldn't have that problem now (I think it is a problem). On the other hand, if one is to watch a crappy movie and read subtitles, that's double catastrophe right in your face, because let's face it, most of these fellas are not here to give us quality, sure they can if they are bent on it but who the heck makes a good feature film in two weeks? Seriously, that's gotta be a big joke. They apply the principles of buying and selling with QUICK turnaround, therefore there is no time to cut out that man wearing Sean John shorts in a movie that is supposedly set in 1818, the shrill blood curding audio that kills whatever excitement left in the movie or the microphone sticking into the scene. I can only sit down and read subtitles if the movie is really good, otherwise I will either look for the English dub or ditch the damn thing. I am sure a whole lot of people think this way.

One thing I can say is these marketers are smarter than we envisaged (not that the smartness does us much good). Seeing that they wouldn't bother spending months shooting movie and some other months polishing things in post production, they figured they could get away with making 'pop corn' movies in English language, after all it is one less punishment, far better than getting their Igbo language films vehemently snubbed due to lack of substance and the additional hassle of reading subtitles.

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D-reloaded alias Thief of hearts.

Has the thread really been cleaned up? You are such as blatant hypocrite. You can advocate for a ban of Olydim, but he will resurrect soon after. So do not even waste your time, ok.

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I think olydimwitted should be banned. After all he's still writing tribalistic rubbish despite the fact that the thread was cleaned up

First off nuzo, I want to thank you for bringing the thread back to the topic despite the psychotic rants of ajisafe, olydmiwitted and the other imbeciles

Now I understand that English Nollywood makes more money for the industry. That's fine. No ONE is saying that they should stop. Infact I don't think you can quote anyone saying such a thing on this thread. My question is why can't they do both? Both WILL sell. Maybe one more than the other but they will both sell either way and that way everyone who likes both kind of movies can have easy access. People shouldnt have to go to the East to watch such movies. It wasnt like that before else I wouldnt have the ones that I have at home.

So the audience can't be blamed, it's the industry that should get the criticism for completely cutting off one for the other. They can make both accessible to everyone. Let us have the option to pick and choose.

Also I don't believe anyone said that such movies is the only way to show Igbo culture. Language however is a big part of one's culture though esp in Africa so why eradicate it just to gain favor from people outside? I think the excuse of "well English is an universal language" is pitiful since that hasnt stopped Bollywood from making it big in the world of film nor has it stopped them from gaining international awards.

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The last post was precisely my point (the economics of movie business and the fact that language is not the only aspect of culture). The koko of the whole thing I have tried to make some dumbhead understand, to no avail.

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Some idiots have gone so far here. This is one of the reasons people should be allowed to choose whether to be Nigerians or not.

@topic

Profit maximization is the soul purpose of making movies all over the world, any other thing can come next.

With this, why would nollywood be different, especially if it's not getting much support from the government.

Complaining about lack of Igbo movies may be worth it, but how do you convince these business men who are trying to feed their families to start making Igbo movies when they make far much money making English movies.

If we must blame anybody for lack of Igbo movies, it would have to be the wider audience, home and abroad who have accepted the nollywood movies.

I personally don't enjoy Nigerian movies, but i always get moved seeing my friends from other nationalities patronize nollywood movies. My Hausa friends here always remind me of how much I'm missing for not watching nollywood movies.

Finally, in as much as TOH and co may have genuine intention on the question raised above, i don't believe that making more movies in Igbo language is the only way to showcase Igbo culture.

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seun, you should also delete the last 5 posts.

good job sha

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@combrazor:

Ah, no wonder! Anyway, you're Ibo. Cannibalism is nothing to you people. What a shame!

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Ibos are the ones destabilizing the polity known as Nigeria. They are quick to insult other tribes, yet they cry foul when they are punished for their stupidity. You all need to grow up. Oloriburuku gbogbo! "De a yin!" Your forefathers first peddled palmwine in the back of their rickety Raleigh bicycles in and around Ibadan before they graduated to selling fake electronics and antibiotic capsules. Dealers in death! Oponu ayirada!

Check this out:

http://www.chatafrikarticles.com/articles/1080/1/WHY-IGBOS-SEE-THEMSELVES-AS-VICTIMS/Page1.html

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@ Combrazor:

Are you kidding me?

You need to read the comments (100's of them) coming from people all over the world. 98% of those comments are negative!

Having a full size image of a human being moulded into one ugly cake that was meant for human consumption reminds one of nothing but CANNIBALISM!

Talking about how people envy your culture -- WTF! We all remembered what the Ibos did to dead bodies of their fallen fellow rebels during the lost cause that was Biafra!

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ajisafe, please dont add to the idiocy in this thread. Let them say whatever they wish. I personally dont care about their hatred or frustration for the "ngabti" people, this is about films.

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plz has anyone watched movies like ,charm ,king kong ,or those animal films i would rather watch those films rather than watching so called nollywood films dat you can predict wats going to happen at the end of it , i do really suggest dat nigerian producers should be sensitive and creative to develop a films like those i mentioned .why can we do animals movies ?

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cris ninge, when you decide to write in English AND make sense at the same time, maybe I'll read your trash.

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85percent of African Countries admire Nigeria films ,while we Nigerians are here blabbing .

I like the film in English ,99percent igbo culture .

In Africa we are in 3 position am proud .

Remember we are ONE Nigeria

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The article from the Germannig fellow adequately answers the question of the first poster. Nigerian movies are private sector driven, and so they have to go for options that bring the highest profit for them. Will Igbo language movies do that. Answer is No. Apparently Yoruba movie makers still live in the Oduduwa century, hence their difficulty in adapting and competing with the far more business-oriented Igbos. As with their dependence on oil from the East (south south and south east) they want govt to come and fund movies for them. Lazy idiots.

Moreover, no Igbo culture will be lost by not making many movies in Igbo. Culture transcends language and movies, apart from the fact that you can express your culture in any Language. Indeed, English is a Nigerian culture having been spoken for more than a century now.

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Sorry bruv,

That is the price to pay when you interact with prostitutes and ignoramuses such as TOH. As you can see, she is a cheap LovePeddler. All her Yoruba culture is abuse and abuse, and more abuse; and people like me are out to pay her back in her own coin.

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So for expressing my God-given opinion, I get an insult from you? Is that what nairaland is all about? Insulting people who do not share your opinion? Is this what this culture thing all about, a ''culture'' of insult and abuse?

I would be glad if you kindly refrain from responding to any of my posts again. I beg of you

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Dude stop fooling yourself. You just added to it with your irrelevant article and the dumb comments that followed

as for "na culture people wan chop", it's mentality like this that is killing Nigeria. Very soon you'll be changing your surnames to "White" because an English surname is "easier to pronounce"

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I think what she is trying to say is that using our local languages in movies helps us more express ourselves in the best way possible knowing that when we use the language, the tendency is that we portray our traditional background better than trying to portray the English culture.

I will give you an example.

Tourists come to nigeria to see our culture and our way of life but if when they come every starts to copy european culture, they can only run away, reason

1. it may be ridiculous because you are not able to copy well

2. if you copied well, they already know that and they wanted to see new things.

They will never come back

But if u portray ur culture, no matter how inaccurate, they will never fault you. all mistakes will be icing in the cake

Igbo kwenu

Having said that, i want them both in Igbo and english.

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arent the ones that get paid so much, banned most of the time for inappropriate behavior? I don't remember actors from back in the day ever getting banned, Bob Manuel, Kanayo, Franca Brown and such

Btw what does that article have to do with the original question?

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I ‘ve never earned more than N100,000 in my career as an actor — Olumide Bakare

Written by Fred Iwenjora

Saturday, January 5, 2008

He was a popular face on the famous sitcom, Koko Close when he played the role of the quarrelsome landlord ( Chief Oluwalambe), in this interview with Jide Ajani and Olaolu Oladipo, he speaks on the epic programme, the movie industry where he reveals that he had never been paid more than N100,000. excerpts;

We want to know how your transition from employment in the Nigeria Television Authority (NTA) to being a key player in the home video industry has been.

My former president in the ANTP, I am a member of the ANTP, though we have a number bodies now in the theater art industry. The former president,Adebayo Salami (Oga Bello) who is a close friend and associate brought me into the system. After my rehabilitation, I went to him and he encouraged me telling me I could still be very active, asking me if I could join them in the home video industry. Before I knew it, this popular guy, Muyiwa Ademola and one other producer approached me in my house in Ibadan. They said they wanted me to come and play a role in their movie.

I asked them to tell me how much they were going to pay me and they said they were going to pay me 3,500 Naira. I was shocked and I asked him what kind of money was that, I wanted to know if that was the kind of money they paid to artists then. He encouraged me, telling me that it was just the starting point. He told me that my consent would do the two of us a lot of good. I introduced the idea to my mother, my mum is somebody that is very close to me. So, I told my mum and she also encouraged me, telling me that God was behind me and I went. You won’t believe it that before the end of the month, a was in about three, four other locations, raking in little money, here and there. That was my entry into the home video industry.

What was the title of the film?

I think the title was Aderounke. That must have been that guy’s (Muyiwa Ademola’s) first or second film. When we were shooting the film, we carried cameras from one house to the other on our heads, there was no vehicles to move us but I thank God for the guy today, he rides on a jeep now that tells you how lucrative the industry is.

You have featured in many films since then, what was the highest amount of money you’ve ever been paid to feature in a movie?

Honestly, I don’t remember the last time I have been paid the sum of 100,000 Naira, the only time I was paid the sum of 120,000 was when I featured as Agboniregun in the epic Yoruba film Oduduwa, since then, I can’t remember having been paid over 100,000 Naira.

Some Nollywood actors are paid up to 1 million

There are so many groups in the Nollywood industry. If you look back at your participation , what gains has been achieved so far in the industry and where do you think attention should be focused on to move it forward?

If I understand your question very well, I will say we need to make improvement in all areas. I want to say that the question of Nollywood being the term to describe the industry is faulty. Probably because we have Hollywood in America, Bollywood in India and some people believe that the best term to describe the industry is Nollywood. Who is Nolly? Who is Wood? Let’s assume that the name Nollywood has come to stay to describe the Nigerian movie industry, is Nollywood being fair to the movie industry in Nigeria?

Then, do you suggest any name?

No, I can not. It only pains that the name has been hijacked by one ethnic group

Does that signifies a dichotomy in the industry?

Yes.

How serious is the dichotomy?

My brother, the dichotomy is very terrible.

Then, what suggestions do you to remedy the situation both in the long and short term as the industry is beginning to attract attention from all directions?

The way forward is that all stakeholders in the Nigerian movie industry come together to form a common body. There so many bodies or groups now.

A veteran like you, Chief Chike Okpala (aka Zebrudaya) said he decided not to be part of the home video industry because those in the industry are not well grounded?

Yes, I think he is right because, some of us doing it (home video) are in it because of our love for the profession. You need to see the kind of insults we get from some of these our younger colleagues on locations. Anybody can just accost you on the road, telling you he or she wants you to help facilitate her/his emergence as an actor just like that.

When we look at our brothers in the Igbo category of Nollywood, one would conclude that they area better organised than you people in the Yoruba category. Why so?

The average Igbo executive producer is first, a businessman. He has a very a strong network of marketing. Being used to trading, they (the executive producer) will go all the way to sell their films.

http://odili.net/news/source/2008/jan/5/304.html

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Good to see this thread is now completely off topic

Good job you guys.

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Now you have agreed that language is not the only culture, and at the same time, you have insinuated that native movies are better than the English movies (made mostly by Igbo) basically because of the language difference. Abi? You are a lost cause and hopelessly so. Please can you tell us what in the Yoruba movies (in which you are well-pleased) make them better than the English movies? And for whom are they better, for a Yoruba or for an Igbo? After all the rigmarole, you have managed to expose the bile of tribalism that you have tried to hide thus far. How many people do you know in Nigeria that prefer native movies to English ones? Did you conduct a survey for that? Now get off my face, you piece of trashy garbage.

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The Igbo movies you claim to be watching in Ibadan, where did you get them from? If in the shop, please say who and who own such shops, and how many different Igbo movies could be found there at any point in time. How long did the movies stay on the shelf before being sold?

In like manner, please take a trip to Igboland and come back and tell me how many Yoruba movies you will find there.

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Those Ibos that think so highly of themselves (especially that "olydim" guy) need to check this out:

http://www.chatafrikarticles.com/articles/1111/1/BIAFRA-INTERNET-TERRORISTS-AND-I/Page1.html

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Shut up and stop your blatant exaggerations. I lived in Ibadan 15 years before relocating abroad. As far back as 15 years ago, you do not have many Igbo films in Ibadan as you would have them in Aba etc. Who except the few Igbos in these places will watch them? Are you a Nigerian who lives in planet mars? You must be kidding me. And, if you are so hard-pressed, and want to know why (in your warped thinking) Igbo movies are not in your film collection, ask the producers and indeed, force them to make Igbo movies to assuage your tainted ego.

The question remains unanswered: is language the only culture?

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Again like I said before, stop making foolish assumptions. Same way you assumed that the french are only known for "soap operas" when any knows their movies are WELL REGARDED in cinema and have been for decades

I went to International School of Ibadan for secondary school, that is not in the East in case you didnt know. I used to watch Igbo movies all the damn time, like I said before I even own some so stop with the ridiculous excuses. The question is why don't we see them around anymore. It's one thing if there were NEVER in "Yoruba Land" but they were, now you are telling me they are now exclusive to the East. Why? Why can't both the English and Igbo movies be sold in places other than the East? That is question the pamela and I are asking that you guys have yet to answer.

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What is the definition of culture anyways? A way of life of the people at any given time and place. Isn't?

Does culture evolve?

If so, after more than 100 years of speaking English in Nigeria, is it wrong to say that English language is a Nigerian culture?

Ignorant people of Nairaland view culture only from one ancient, fixated perspective of customary beliefs that are not modifiable.

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So because perhaps there are not as many Igbo movies as you want, Igbo are now not proud of their culture? So other Nigerian tribes who do not make movies do not have other means of expressing their culture abi? So language is the only culture you know? Nothing wey person no go see for this Nairaland

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i don't think what u've said made any sence, cos there is a great need to be proud of ones culture and u'll agree with me that language is culture.also why must it be only the igbo movie? what about the yoruba movie? why is nothing been said about it?

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The Mexicans are in Mexico yet I can still watch Amores Perros without going there, Seun.

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The east is where Igbo people are concentrated, right?

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Is Ribadu an Igbo man?

speaking of Olu Jacobs,that guy is the finest,most polished actor in Nollywood.

His English is crisp and his voice is melodic.

TOH looks like you've reloaded once more LOl

Happy New year

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Im glad you edited your rubbish cos the group I see being insulted on this thread arent the Igbos.

Hw about you answer pamela's questions instead?

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Hopefully they will stop acting like victims and stick to the topic.

None of them have bothered to answer the original poster's question, instead they are crying about "ngabti people".

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Guys, don't let us turn nairaland to a ground for tribal assault. I believe everyone in this forum is educated and young Nigerians. Despite the fact that we should not forget our origins, we should not be swept into same mistake the older generations of this country had made in building tribal barrier everywhere. Let this forum be a place of robust and informed debate where less of tribal exaltation is seen. The focus should be on Nigeria and Nigeria alone. Less of deviation pls.

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