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If You Were Switched At Birth, Would You Like To Return To Your Real Family? :

Judge signs custody agreement

Court ruling determines status of children switched at birth

Jacqueline Roper, Cavalier Daily Associate Editor

Conley and Chittum were switched at birth in 1995 at the University Medical Center.

DAN LOPEZ - CAVALIER DAILY FILE PHOTO

Stafford County Circuit Court Judge James W. Haley Jr. approved an agreement Friday made between the families of two girls switched at birth in 1995 at the University Medical Center.

The agreement determines the custody status of Callie Conley, the child residing in Stafford County. The custody arrangement for Rebecca Chittum, the other child, was decided in a Buena Vista court in November.

The Stafford County agreement allows both children to remain with the families who raised them while granting visitation to the biological families.

Haley signed the order presented to the court on Friday, said Cynthia Johnson, attorney for Paula Johnson, who is Rebecca Chittum's biological mother.

The switch was discovered in July 1998 following a custody dispute between Paula Johnson and her ex-boyfriend Carlton Conley. Results from DNA tests showed neither Johnson nor Carlton were the biological parents of Callie Conley. Medical Center officials soon identified the other child involved as Rebecca Chittum, who left the hospital with Kevin Chittum and Whitney Rogers of Buena Vista. The couple was killed in a car accident a few days before officials tried to contact them. Chittum's and Rogers's parents share custody of Rebecca.

In November, a Buena Vista judge denied Paula Johnson custody of her biological daughter Rebecca. The court decreed she would stay with the Rogers and Chittums, and that Paula Johnson would have visitation rights, said Michael A. Groot, attorney for the Chittums.

Johnson then filed to formally adopt Callie so her rights as a parent would be recognized. But with Friday's agreement, Johnson and the Chittums both dropped their bids to adopt Callie.

http://www.cavalierdaily.com/CVArticle.asp?ID=3853&pid=562

What are your opinions on this controversy? And would you like to move back to your real family permanently if you found out that you were switched at birth?

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11 answers

http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/abby/6186118-417/adopted-sons-name-change-hurts-real-dad.html

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No. I definitely would not go back. "He who raises a child is the legal parent of the child". And they're the only family I know anyway.

To me they would always be my parents not fake parents!

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Great post spermdrops. There is no more and no less to that. But maaaaaan, easy on the abuses. lol!

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poor or rich i will go back to my biological parents except if they don't want me. but i will remain not just grateful but loyal also to my surogate parents.

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if they are rich, sure.

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I will definitely want to go back to my original family, since I'm most likely to begin feeling somehow awkward in the home where I had been raised.

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Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, i think i might just stay with the parents n siblings i av always known, cos i dont gel easily n dat might just be a problem if i go 2 d parents i am nt used 2. It would really be a strange world 2 me.

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Really hard. Will likely decide to stick where I am raised already, but may drop the surname for my children and start my own genealogy.

If the biological parents are better off, they may assist in upbringing. Will be visiting them and also accept them naturally.

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Lets say, your parents treated you well throughout your pre-teen life, and you led a normal, memorable life growing up with your siblings. Then the unexpected occurs with the shocking news from the family court, that an unfortunate circumstance led to you being switched at birth. And, now your biological parents want you back. What do you do? The child they had been raising, meanwhile was also switched and thus, belongs to the parents who raised you up. You have the opportunity of either being swapped with the other child back to your real parents, or you choose to cut off ties with your biological parents. What are your choices?

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@topic

depends on wat must have ensured all along.

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