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What Is The Difference Between Learnt And Learned?

What is the difference between learnt and learned.

Please use examples, I often get confused in which I should use or why.

It was what I learnt.

It was what I learned.

??I learned from the best.

I learnt the hard way??

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10 answers

The learned are always vigilant.

I learnt French while in Paris

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Well, this is one of those things that got me confused when I just started my writing career.

After researching the internt extensively, I discovered that both are correct and are used by both the British and the Americans.

As for me, I used "learned" in my writing and "learnt" in my speech.

(English language is interesting, but I think the American are adding spice to it with their craziness.)

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I really appreciate this lesson. The problem i have is the computer's spell check. It accepts none of them as correct

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Clarifications please!!!

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I thought my response was clear as to what I meant. For the avoidance of doubt, what isn't exactly true is saying one is American and the other English. Like I said, though the Americans favour one over the other, they are both English with one being a past tense while the other is a past participle of the verb - learn [Good to see you got confirmation of this fact from Oxford]. And like I also said, both can be used interchangeably, but this still does not change their individual tense status. 

Unfortunately, I have no control over what you think. Moreover, almost every topic under the sun is up for debate, so it's really no big deal if you feel this is another one.

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I've always been told that the Americans say learned and British say learnt.

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In my opinion, what is boils down to is familiarity. I get looks from people when I say learnt, spolit, spelt and I give people looks when they use the -ed words. Both sides are use to hearing it one way, it makes the other sound so wrong. . . so very, very wrong. For awhile, I had to set my word dictionary to British because it kept red-lining my T words. . .Ughhh! LOL

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I came across this explanation which I though might interest you:

The *prescriptive* answer is:

"learned" should used in phrases such as "a learned professor", in which case it is pronounced with two syllables.

"learnt" should be used in phrases like "I learnt a valuable lesson today".

The *descriptive* answer in British English is:

"learned" is used in phrases such as "a learned professor", in which case it is pronounced with two syllables.

Either "learnt" or "learned" are used interchangably in phrases like "I learnt a valuable lesson today".

The *descriptive* answer in American English is:

There is no such word as "learnt". Use "learned" always.

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I'm sorry but I don't get what exactly isn't really true? Is it that they don't mean the same or Learnt isn't British and Learned. . . American?

I don't think this is necessarily true. Sure saying learnt sounds better. . . that is "more correct" is up for debate

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Learnt - English

Learned - American

Same meaning.

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