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Why Isn't Nigerian Music Very Popular Internationally?

Ok, in nearly all endeavours, Nigerians have made their mark. In the educational field, Nigerians are recognized for 'breeding' geniuses, in the movie industry, we have more than a fair number of actors/actresses with a respectable clout representing us in Hollywood. In Music, Sade Adu has crossed over into international stardom, with her hits played on at least one radio station in the USA.

Apart from Sade, I am now aware of any musician of Nigerian heritage, whose crossover appeal has received as much applause or adulation in the media, compared to their African counterparts. Several days ago, I was watching some of our musicians sing, and some of them, I noticed were imbibing American moves in their rhythm. Cant we all be original? I wasnt the only one who noticed it, for one of the ladies at the party also pointed that Nigerians are very good in emulating the western world (we tend to overdo, by the way, sometimes) and abandon our traditional moves, etc.

Look at their Senegalese counterpart, likewise the Malian , the Congolese and perhaps the Guineans. They are quite popular in the western world, despite retaining their own cultural rhythm in their music. Cant we do the same too? Attend a Nigerian party as one lady told me, Makossa is played, with much excitement, while our own hits, that are played are usually oldies, like "Sweet Mother (by the way, the musician was from Cameroon). We have talented musicians like Okosun, Essien-Igbokwe, Sunny Ade, and the rest, but what of the newer generation? Tuface and BankyW are quite popular in the Nigerian community in the USA, but really, how popular is the Nigerian music in the Western Nation?

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73 answers

And what's the name of the Nigerian musician who wrote the African Queen?

http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com//index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=13608&Itemid=55

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@topic, who knows

Although a lot of people here know "African queen", I doubt many of them know it was sung by a Nigerian.

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Seal? What remix does he play? Trado Nigerian music or mainstream music? As for Lagbaja, is he popular in the USA? Note, I am not trying to diss any of the musicians. One might say that traditional nigerian music might not be accepted in the mainstream, but look at Youssou who is perhaps the most famous musician from Africa. His beat is derived from his culture. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youssou_N'Dour

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Hands down@naijadiva, that's what I am also thinking. Youssou N'dour is one of the famous musicians from Africa. From your comment, which I do agree, my take is that our musicians are perhaps trying too hard to incorporate foreign music into our beat. We are known for doing so. Look at the literary forum and read one of the comments from some guy, who in a bid to reach an international audience is incorporating foreign settings in his novels. I mean for what?

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don't be mad cuz i'm telling the truth. until they get internationally known outside the nigerian community, then you can speak.

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Go and sing your own - u this croaky voiced toad.

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exactly. if you hear a conglese, senegalese, or malian music, you'll know its african music but nigerians copy to much from what they think hip hop/r&b is. it took me a while to get past the accent before i stared to like nigerian music. i grew up listening to old traditional nigerian music with my father and sometimes prefer it more to the more recent music.

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@chichi

i concur. In a short word uniqueness,carving a niche for oneself, creativity etc. not Mr Follow-Follow.

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I think that most people here are just focussing on the Nigerian artists that are in the spotlight already .There are many (upcoming) artists that are not even following the scenes of hip-hop, R&B or rap but have their own style but yet people still focus on the ones like Tuface and P-Square. I mentioned before some of the artists that I think that have their own style.

The main issue is promotion and marketing which does not go without money. It depends also on the target of the managers of these artists. Or they should do something very shocking that can make them come in the international news like what Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake did ( nipplegate) a publicity stunt. Its just an example.

People keep on refering to Fela's fame internationally which had also something to do with his rebellious lyrics and open protest on the regime in particular about Nigeria. This caused a lot of attention especially in a country that was under the millitairy regime at that time.

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becos naija pipul don dey craze

naija pipul no dey proud of demsefs

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My perspective about our music not very popular internationally is as good as what eveyone here have said, however until we become genuine in our concepts we wont see the light of "international" day, cos if the moon strives to be like the sun, it wont have any recognition. No matter how we try to be American you only become twisted if you try too hard, now no doubt they(Americans) set the pace as models in this music thing, we still need originality. See Fela he got somewhere yet his music wasnt hip hop, rap or rock.

And i dont if this is true, i think the artists 'emselves dont want to go international, i say this cos they are so "reward" sensitive that if an opportunity present itself without great reward they grab it by the "elbow" instead of the horn.

For example, for two cosecutive years now,attempts have been made to bring certain artists to New York for the "Nigerian Independence Parade" but by 'emselves they screw it up.

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Nuff Respect to all the contributors to particular topic. Having read through, i would simply submit that like every other thing Nigerian, Nigerian Music continues to suffer a lack of international appeal for various reasons which some writers here have already highlighted.

1. You cannot find these so called artistes in Record shops abroad. I approached Premier Christian Radio London in 2002 with the CD's of some Nigerian Gospel artistes i was working with. They Listened to them, liked the stuff but wouldn't play them. So i asked why? They said when they play them and listeners phone to ask where can they get the album, where are they going to point them to as these artistes did not have any international distribution agreement.

2. The Production quality is sometimes suspect. But i believe that is getting better.

3. One contributor said we cannot rap better than Americans. How true. We cant sing ragga better than the Jamaicans. When you originate something, you possess a special ability to take to another level just like that.ich is why no Oyinbo will do Afro Beat better than Fela.

We need to evolve our style. The Congolese have done that with Makossa. It is a unique sound associated with the Congolese only. You dont hear it and start trying to figure out where it came from.

Thats why when Sunny Ade comes abroad, he gets rave reviews and his audience in England is made up of 60% Oyinbo.

4. We cannot do movies based on Hollywood lifestyles when we dont even possess the base technology to do those kind of movies.

I believe that the Nigerian Music style that will make waves internationally is FUJI, I dont listen to Fuji, but i follow its development. If the artistes sign a distribution deal with a company like VP Records in America( they are involved with spreading the Reggae/ gospel all over America), FUJI will make it.

Just my humble submission O

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Sports forum would be the appropriate place to post this message of yours@superman

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im sure there is some element of truth in this one as well ! damn south africa  and zimbabewa accent sucks!

im comin back

im caming baeke! una de craze over there

WORLD CUP 2010 : South Africa blacklist Nigeria?

Ademola Olajire

Saturday, January 13, 2007

It would appear that the South African organizers of the 19th football World Cup finals in Year 2010 deliberately don’t want anything to do with Nigerians as they prepare for the showpiece in three-and-half years time!

South Africa’s triumph at the poll for the 2010 World Cup hosting in FIFA’s headquarters in Zurich on May 15, 2004, was the handiwork of diligent and tireless South African bid chiefs, that country’s former President and world citizen, Nelson Mandela, the South African society and the entire African continent.

But events since the victory have shown that the South Africans, for whom Nigeria stepped down from the race to enhance their chances of winning, do not have so much regard for Nigerian people.

In constituting its Ambassadors for the 2010 finals, South Africa’s organizers have picked the likes of Ghanaian legend, Abedi Pele, Liberian superstar and 1995 World Player of the Year, George Weah, Cameroonian hero, Roger Milla and Zambian legend, Kalusha Bwalya.

No Nigerian made it to the list.

Yet, the continent’s most populous nation with 140 million, boasting so many super athletes and credible sports managers all over the world, has always done her best to buoy South Africa in any way her assistance is needed. Nigeria spearheaded the decades-long battle against apartheid - the obnoxious system that segregated blacks from the whites in the enclave for several decades, denying the blacks their rights.

One can still remember how Nigeria missed winning gold medals at the 1976 Olympics in Montreal and the 1978 Commonwealth Games in Edmonton (both in Canada, simply in protest against the indulgence of South African white supremos. Nigeria also led an African boycott of the 1986 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland, because Britain was perceived not to be doing enough to ginger the white leaders of South Africa to abandon apartheid practices.

It is therefore surprising that after doing everything again to assist her in winning the hosting right of the first World Cup to be staged in Africa, the South Africans would shun Nigeria so much.

That apartheid no longer exists today is chiefly due to the concerted efforts of Nigerian government officials, and sports chieftains, who drove the bulwark against apartheid. Nigeria’s International Olympic Committee (IOC) Member, Sir Adetokunbo Ademola (now late), did so much to block the admission of South Africa to the IOC, and his replacement, Major-General Henry Edmund Olufemi Adefope continued where he stopped.

In fact, in recognition of the role that Nigeria played in kicking apartheid to a state of permanent coma, the International Olympic Committee included Nigeria’s Adefope in its team to assess the progress made by South Africa in multi-racial relations and eventual re-admission to the global body.

Some of the best athletes to have come out of Nigeria forfeited the opportunity of winning Olympic medals in their lifetime when the country opted to boycott the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. This cast included Modupe Oshikoya, Charlton Ehizuelen, Kunle Awesu, Thompson Usiyen, Mudashiru Lawal, Sam Ojebode, Babatunde Obisanya and Baba Otu Muhammad.

All had won gold at the 2nd All-Africa Games that Nigeria staged in 1973 and were in peak form for the Olympics because the Federal Government of General Olusegun Obasanjo announced that Nigeria would not be going because New Zealand, which rugby team went on a playing tour of South Africa, and continued to dally with the South Africans, was in the Games.

It was a shock to the athletes because they were already in Montreal before the announcement, and had to pack their bags out of the Olympic Village in a hurry as the government dispatched an aircraft to take them back to Lagos.

So many other athletes lost the chance to win medals at the Commonwealth Games in Edmonton two years later, which the government again boycotted for similar reasons. In 1986, the government of General Ibrahim Babangida announced that Nigeria would not be attending the Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh because Britain was not doing enough to kick South Africa’s apartheid-hugging leaders in the behind.

Nigeria is on record to have spearheaded so many other things to get apartheid out of South African lives. South Africa was eventually re-admitted into international sports fold in the early 1990s.

But the efforts of Nigeria are not being appreciated by South Africa’s new black leaders.

This reporter was a member of a three-man Nigeria media team that interviewed South Africa’s bid leader (now organizing committee, CEO) Danny Jordaan at the Cape Sun Hotel in Cape Town, in February 1999, and he promised that should South Africa get the hosting right, it would be an African World Cup. The country failed to get that one, losing to Germany by a single vote for the 2006 finals, but won the vote for 2010.

Nigeria’s vibrant and respected media dug in deep in condemnation of the act that denied South Africa the 2006 vote and this country’s sports officials spoke against it, saying the ‘World’ should be removed from the ‘World Cup’ since no African country is deemed good enough to host it.

It was the scale and consistency of the condemnation (chiefly by the Nigerian media) and the body language of Africa’s leading administrators that compelled FIFA to adopt the rotation policy that eventually ensured the 2010 finals would come to Africa.

But the events since then have left much to be desired and South African organizers need to explain what qualifies Ghanaian Abedi Pele for a role as ambassador for 2010 WC that does not qualify Nigeria’s Jay-Jay Okocha, Rashidi Yekini, Stephen Keshi or Nwankwo Kanu.

Yekini was  African Player of the Year 1993 and scored Nigeria’s first goal at the World Cup in 1994, and also played at the 1998 World Cup. He played in four African Nations Cup finals and was top scorer in Tunisia in 1994 when Nigeria won the trophy.

Keshi captained Nigeria for 10 years and played at five Nations Cup finals, and also at the 1994 World Cup. He has since gone into coaching and qualified tiny Togo for both the Nations Cup in Egypt and the World Cup finals in Germany last year.

Okocha played in three World Cup finals and five Nations Cup finals, and is included in the great Pele’s list of the Best 100 Footballers alive. An impressario without equal, Okocha played in Germany, Turkey, France and England, and is still playing in Qatar. He also won Olympic football gold.

Kanu won FIFA World Junior Cup in 1993, has played in four Nations Cup finals and two World Cups, and captained Nigeria’s team to Olympic gold in 1996. He was named African Footballer of the Year in 1996 and 1999 and has a Heart Foundation, funding surgeries for Africa’s endangered youth.

Abedi Pele never played at either the Olympics or the World Cup!

The Confederation of African Football, in its wisdom, picked two of its top officials, Nigeria’s Amos Adamu (exco member) and Egypt’s Mustapha Fahmy (scribe) to be co-opted into the organizing committee of the 2010 WC by the organizers. But Saturday Sports learnt these two officials have never been invited to any meeting, event or programme on the championship.

Meanwhile, persons from Europe, Asia and South America are being invited to help the hosts with their expertise in order to deliver a World Cup finals that FIFA will be proud of. Are there no Nigerians who have expertise in this regard?

It must also be noted that the South African organizers have not shown any regard for women athletes and administrators. While the world body, FIFA finds Nigeria’s Mercy Akide good enough to be their ambassador for women’s football, SA 2010 WC does not think she is worth a mention, or even any female footballer for that matter.

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He's not an English man but can criticize an English accent? Does that make any form of sense to you? Tell me you his tutor huh? Excuse me!!!

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Leave the guy alone@radiant, he is not an Englishman, and by the way, there is some element of truth in what he wrote, even though one might interpret it as arrogant.

Sadis, where in Burkina Faso do you hail from? I also want to visit your country. I liked your late president, Thomas Sankara. One of the best presidents that Africa has produced. So sad that his life was cut short. Ever been to this place, Banfora and Bobo Dioulasso? Those are the places that I want to visit in addition to Yako, the birthplace of Sankara. Let me know more about those places if possible.

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these africans damn!!

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hi guys,

i'm from burkina faso but living in usa i'am a big fan of nigerian music i have a huge collection of old timers like el hadji haruna ishola i believe he was and still the best nigerian artist by far i'm mostly apala music guy i love it so much i listen to it everyday but i don't have a clue what they singing about lol.i think a music need to be original to make it in the world market like malian,senegalese,and congolese.nowaday nigerians artists are too influenced by r&b and rap with bad english accent lol.

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Who is this DIOS guy?

Can he talk more meaningfully without trying to bring accent into his writtings?

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There is nothing wrong in imbibing/incorporating some elements of a foreign musical into our beats but some of our artistes tend to overdo it. If you are singing pure trado african music, then imbibing hiphop into the flow would only reduce the quality of the music. At times, one may even wonder what the genre of music that our artistes are recording, because of so many incorporation. As for rap, which is an African American music, I am not a fan of it and I don't approve of its sometimes derogative portrayal of women. But don't be surprised, if some of our artistes join the bandwagon and quickly incorporate these much despised action into their songs.

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@ Donzman

Exactly, Nigerian artistes will do well capturing African countries. Americans always seem to feel so superior most of hip-hop music and video is becoming such a routine only things you hear and see is : sex, girls, dollars, rides and gangsta behavior that is soooo original! That is the hype for Americans that is the only thing that seems to sell from the blacks.

@ Ndipe

I did not say that Nigerian artists are the best purely because I am from Nigeria but I feel that they are really trying compared to (five) years ago. There are many artists that have their own style and however If they will become international recognized soon I doubt it. I know how much the West will like to keep Africans out of their spotlight. There are also Nigerian artists that are just copy cats and have no style of their own-- they should not even be in the business of music. The constructive criticism given by some posters were helpfull many were just lamenting and criticising these artists about no originality or Africanism in videos or music. I realize that most of those posters don't even listen to upcoming Nigerian artists they have already condemned them before hearing the song purely because it is home-made. I guess in most cases its an unconcious thing which I have seen in many Nigerians ( abroad & home) when the topic involves Nigeria or anything that relates to it

There are many times I play Nigerian music from upcoming artists for instance Zule Zoo, this guy that sang with Klint the Drunk ( I forgot his name), Weird MC with Iyoya and so on. They deserve some more credit than given to them. It is difficult to penetrate in the entertainment and if Tuface performed in a small local place in US or UK is a stepping stone already. In the Netherlands, some South- Americans and whites can sing African Queen from beginning to the end. It might not be international achievement for most of you but it is a beginning. Most of the American artists started that way for years nobody knew them and then they met the right person/contact that led them where they are today.

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We don't need to go international to be successful. Most of these American artistes are barely known outside of the U.S./Canada. They do well because the U.S. has a population of 340+ million.

The best move for our musicians is to capture West/Central/South Africa and the Carribean just like we're doing with Nollywood. We don't need to appeal to people who feel their culture is superior, let's admit it, even with the best musicians, Americans won't accept that it's good music.

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right recognise a true soldier! next time u know what u are dealin with brov!

1 blood still and happy new year!

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sori im not ur gay patner sori

mistaken ID

suck off

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Superman,get of my d*ck kid, you a stalker or something?

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sucker F C U  K er! what do u know @ dois! dnt let those white gals in US boys scout army get to your head ooo! u go wound ooo

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@ Dios,

You are another coward coming up in a brand new name, obviously, u are just an old NL who's scared to come out in his regular name. I'll give you my first and last reply, and put you on auto ignore as well, you arent worth more than 2 mins of my time, and i won't give you more than that!

I don't know who said Nas is Nigerian, it's all rumour, a Yoruba Priest gave his Dad Oludara, so what's new?

Aguilera, Iglesias and Ricky Martin, do they sing Reggae?

I said a few whites made it in Rap, does it mean that Em and Beastie Boys are the best rappers ever? But they sold more than most blacks put together!

You clearly lack common sense which is supposed to be common, if someone like you ever released an album, only fellow Lepers like you would buy.

Buy you a coffin if you're tired of life and need to die @ all cost, must you show us how urgent you need suicide? Olodo!

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The music is wack, the only song that I've heard so far that could very well crossover is African Queen, I've played it around a couple of females and they actually liked it, the dude could have easily capitalised of the that Phat Girlz movie and shot a real nice video with Monique in it and taken it to BET, maybe he could have sold a few grand worth of ring tones, chamillionaire sold 3million of riding dirty afterall. That would have been the first step tho, the next step woulda been making another hit song but I doubt he can ever duplicate African queen(maybe if he had Akon write him a song).

I've heard a few other songs and videos and truth is they lack mass appeal, I even heard this fool dissing 50 and couldn't understand what the jackass was saying. So corner your market first and flood it with some good product, then try to see if you can break into Europe b4 dreaming of breaking into the states, even the west coast can gain no ground,the south running poo right now and like Jeezy would say thaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaatsssssssssssss riiiiiiiiiiiiight.

Nas ain't no Nigerian, his dad just changed his name to Olu Dara, the dudes name ins Nasir Jones and he never Queens till he blew up. And for f*ck's sake stop saying Aguilera,Inglesias,Ricky Martin in the same sentence as Hip Hop,y'all driving me crazy.

And whoeva said white boys are big in Rap is crazy, Beastie Boys and Eminem are the only ones and the biggest part if that is whites are the biggest consumers but Em got mad skills tho.

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@ Kenny,

I get your point man, and I feel you. you'll agree with me that as Marley is to Jamaica, so is Fela to Nigeria. Besides Marley and 2 other Reggae artistes, how many of them are actually known internationally? Reggae has a lot of appeal and popularity worldwide but even the reggae artistes we know (who are actually making it) are based in Yankee.

People like Beenie Man still keep it live. Wyclef, Shaggy, Sean Paul and their likes are almost totally American in their music nowadays, with a spice of reggae. If Akon spent so much time in Senegal, i don't think he'd be a great hit today.

Let's take country music and rap for example, can a black choose to sing country music today and make it? I sincerely doubt. Same goes for rock, metal among others. But we've seen a few white rappers do what the black man does best in the form of RAP and they made it big time. A living example is Eminem, I won't be surprised to hear that he has sold more than Tupac (hope you get the dubs in this scenario). I'm not racist in my view but you can imagine how America and whites generally have responded to Eminem's brand of rap.

How do you sell Ice in iceland? Answer is simple - packaging. If in everyway, the western culture has taken over, the way we dress, our language and even our economic policies, it's hard to retain the african culture. Someone like Fela chose his way of life totally, from dressing, to his choice of Pidgin English, to Ganja smoking, to marriage, religion and other stuffs, he did not do "follow follow" like we have today.

Besides Femi Kuti, another Nigeria I believe, who can make a strong impact internationally is Lagbaja. I strongly believe in that dude. He's still African, in his voice, choice of words, concept and story line. In the video of never far away, he stripped the ochestra of their western clothing and had them wear their trads), Then the drums . . . very good indeed.

Another group is Ijodee, those guys are great dancers making lots of impact in West Africa and I strongly believe the lead dancer was the main guy in the video clip of Olori Oko by infinity.

Fela did not attain such popularity within minutes and I think it's too early to judge the upcoming "original" ones and the strugling "wannabees" like I said, we've started seeing quality soundtracks and video clips better than 99% of what we saw in the 90s and that's a step further to gaining international appeal.

Unlike nollywood and plenty of their dull storyline and copy copy and over lifting, Nigerians are trying to bust into the international stage with quality materials and in 10 years time, this thread would be a reference point.

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It is because of the African way of speaking the English Language in the music and songs. Most International audience don't understand the words if they are not in English and can't sing along or dance to it. If Nigerian music could be presented in the language and accent of the international audience like Sade Adu is doing, I believe Nigerian music may become popular internationally.

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Kenny my brother the gimmicks on this board are too lame to realise it. Funny thing is these lames have never stepped outside the shores of Nigeria let alone spending half of their lives abroad yet they think they know more than someone who is. They read stuffs online, listen to a few stuff on their local media stations, garbled that up with ridiculous local rumours and take these as gospel.What they fail to realize is that most of the stuff they are presented is from the perspective of Nigerians so some level "patriotism" is inevitable.

Go through this thread and evidence of these is right in your face. They tell them TuFace came to perform in London and they get things confused thinking he was prolly performing at Wembley Arena or sumpin when the kid was at some local hall in Peckham. And I'm not saying that ain't good but we gotta understand exactly what it means to regard someone as popular International act.

Even though I'm Nigerian and spent my early years in Nigeria I am a lover of music although I am strictly a Rap/Hip-Hop stan. But then I love them Congolese music just like you said Kenny. In fact them stuffs, Fela and some "vintage" materials from KSA, Ebenezer Obey are the only things you'll find mixed with my vast collections of largely American Hip-Hop, R'n'B, plus Coldplay and few other Rock materials I dig. And I'm talking 300+ albums albums right from 1984(the year I was born) of Run DMC and the early days Def Jam yet these lames believe they're so deep into this shyt more than everyone else.

I have deliberated long on this issue some 3-4 years ago personally because I felt a little weird as I didn't feel stuffs from all these Nigerian want to-bes who think they can do better than the Americans. I even gave some of their stuff to the American audience on a forum just to get a neutral perspective and the feedback was even worse because they can't understand let alone relate to what's being said. The American audience don't even feel materials from UK rappers like Dizzy Rascal, Sway, and Kano (who you can argue should share similar subjects) so how the Bleep they gon' relate to Nigerian stuff huh? Even I don't feel them cats!

I've heard respectable American acts like Nas and others giving props to Fela. Damn even Nas sampled Fela's material on the Warrior track on God's Son, Fela shared table with great acts James Brown and Stevie Wonder. I've seen a performance of Baba Maal at the Royal Festival Hall back in 1999(when the first rapper to get a somewhat similar treatment was Jay-Z last year at the Royal Albert hall). Yet people are too confused to recognize the fact that these guys are respected because of the originality they showed in their Music: The Africanism.

Being an International act means gaining the attention of people of "different cultures" around the world not gaining the attention of your fellow Nigerian residing abroad.

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Am surprised no one seems to understand that the problem is that Nigerian music is not an identifiable or a particular type of music internationally. It is so varied and sometimes a duplication of western music that nobody cares and thus it goes unnoticed.

For instance, Makosa is a unique type of music with an international appeal even though its not sung in English; and even though there are many types of musicians singing it they are all doing well internationaly.

I do not understand a word of Koffi Olomide's lyrics yet I love his music as its original and unique and I know a lot of  non-Africans who loves it too. Ghanaian music is also easily indentifiable, danceable and has an highlife music quality to it and is surely coming up

But tell me what type of music does Tuface sing, or Lagbaja, or Genevieve, or Omotola   etc.  Fela is probably the only Nigerian musician who has traversed the boundary by means of originality, I cannot think of anyone else.

Most of our musicians do not try to be original and true to the African culture which is what attracts foreigner to their music.

Hmmmm….Why isn't Nigerian Music Very Popular Internationally?

Simple question, its because they are mostly fake and untrue to their origin

Go figure.

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@ Chichinma,

I stand to be corrected but until the late 90's the only place i'd seen ladies shake their asses in video clips was in Afro Beat Videos and Tours like Fela and Femi & Co. Also in our Juju and Fuji videos, "omoge Judie, komole" was a common slang for them, back then we saw most American video clips ranging from Shaba Ranks to Mc Hammer to Puffy, to Jay-Z, no serious Bottom shakers in sight, then we started seeing Thongs!

As for the indians, many people have used indian soundtracks, from Truth Hurts to our own Aladdin and Julius Agwu.

Michael jackson got the Brazillian beats in They don't care about us and did well with it.

We are one - Angelique Kidjo had an African appeal and was highly accepted for Lion king's soundtrack. He lives in you by Diana ross was also spiced up with African sounds.

Some of these are foreigners using non-western sounds to make waves, why on earth can't we get there someday?

By the way who knows Jay Sean? that Indian dude doing RnB like he's really American? Even most new Bollywood movies have soundtracks like the Americans, Choreography inclusive

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Chichima, I would like to think that our criticism is constructive. We just can't fawn that Nigerian music are the best, because we are from Nigeria. I don ask this question, and some people seem to agree with me, "Why do some of our musicians, especially the upcoming ones, tend to emulate/inculculate Western rhythm in their choreography? Why can't we be original? Some of our people always overdo thing at times. Tell me, has any of these Western Musicians like Beyounce or Jayz or Patti Labelle ever incorporated any African theme in their music? Why should we copy theirs then? Please, dont even mention globalization as the factor for this copy copy syndrome that is quite prevalent amongst our people. Stick with originality, and you can attain success with it. Dont duplicate, you will always remain second best.

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Exactly, that is the main problem we have always lamenting and criticizing about everything that is home-made ! How can someone else appreciate it then? The mayority of our people are like that just highlighting what is bad or negative instead of shining the light on the areas that most matter people are trying entertain the African masses with music that one can relate to or with!

For those that can't appreciate Nigerian artists that are trying to entertain and make an impact on their people should try and do a better job than. As for me these artists are really doing their best so far many artists had made impacts on me for several different reasons ( I am not going to name them all). They are not all the way there but will be with the right marketing, promotion, performances and confidence of making it on an international level!

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Radiant, I haven't seen you in awhile, rose from the dead?

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Yeah you're right bro. I was impressed when I was in Lagos this summer, it was Naija jamz all over the airwaves and every Dick and Harry listens to Naija Jams on CD, Radio, Channel0 and MTV Base.

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@ Soliq

Can you compare the craze we used to have for foreign wears (clothing and shoes) to that of music? But for the turnouts when foreign artistes come visiting, local music are all over the place, from radio to TV and stuffs, but for the billboard chart program, its been long since i saw a non nigerian chart show.

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It is because we don't appreciate what have, and if we don't appreciate what we have, nobody else is gonna appreciate it.

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True you have a point, but NONE

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@Topic

Nigerian music is not popular because what is being marketed as Nigerian music is a blend of other genres.

In most Nigerian music you can hear the reggae sound, hip-hop, and R&B. Nothing that can be said unique to Nigeria.

An example is 2face "African Queen". That song gave the artist lots of accolades, but on a true examination of the arrangement, it was just a ripoff of lyrical style of other genres,

Why go for a fraud product when the original material can be had easily had?. ie Reggae, R&B, hip-hop etc.

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Psquare and Tony Tetuila were nominees at the last MOBO (Music of Black origin) awards in London in 2006.http://rap.about.com/od/awards/a/2006MOBOAwards.htm

and 2 face won that MTV africa award didn't he?

that's a step in the right direction for international recognition for others as well.

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WELL, THIS IS SIMPLY BECAUSE OF CULTURAL DIFFERENCES

HTTP://WWW.NIGERIANSINGLESONLINE.NET

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@Josboy4life, there is no such thing as bad publicity.

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As usual, as soon as the debate reaches page 2, it starts to degenerate into insults.

The simple answer to the question is promotion. When Fela, KSA and other people of that era where making a name, we had international recording companies in Nigeria, promoting our musicians to the so-called international audience. How can you love music you don't know, have never heard. It's impossible. Of course most of them took off in the 80's after the military coup and our economy nose-dived. Once they left, the music industry simply crashed.

The interesting thing is that they will come back, because the buzz around Nigerian music is getting stronger, and the environment is becoming better for them to operate in.

Show business is just business (like food business, or auto business).

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@ Superman

Must you abuse just because you want to pass a point accross or just because someone fails to agree with your line of reasoning?

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people cnt understand nigeria music slang and thing because they aint nigerian!

as for superman( like ghanaian usually say) nigeria mainstream music are just wakin up, so maybe they need some time afterall dancehall ragge was once like that! and they came with their slang still people learn and row with it! so it all good runnin your blo*dclot or bomberc*ut mouth like u know but u actually dnt know nothin!

now dnt tell me about those africans that bleaches a lot and believe in strippin their women nake just to get recognition, hope we dnt go that way.

so can i say we wait and see!

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