«Home

Aid For Africa, Is There Any Justification For The Cancellation Of Our Debts?

The recent cancellation of our foreign debt was applauded in close quarters. Some people hailed this landmark as a positive step towards development in Nigeria. Iweala spearheaded this debt cancellation and for some, she is seen as a contender for the President of Nigeria. However, while I applauded this generousity by the west, I would have to ask this question that is also mentioned by some pessimistic Nigerians, "Who really benefits from the debt cancellation'? Do kids in the village ever enjoy the fruits of this labor by the Minister, or is it some gimmick spinned around by some eminent Nigerians to gain the sympathy of the western nation. Already, news reports have surfaced that our vice president Atiku Abubakar is closely linked to a bribery scandal involving some politician in the United States of America. So, again, that is a blow to our image, because several weeks ago, when CNN aired our dirty laundry to the world, some Nigerians offered a rebuttal to this damaging document, decrying that the western press is only attuned to negative stories surrounding Africa, while casting a blind eye to the positive ones.

But where are the positive ones? Why is Africa still mired in the bondage of starvation and corruption, while their counterparts are spearheading a new wave of developement that is beneficial to the society? I live in America and I notice the relatively good life of her citizens, as opposed to the squalid life in Africa. What will be the contribution of our present generation to the lives of our people back home? Our politicans have failed us immensely, thus creating a nation of instability, separating families all in the quest for the American dream.

But that aside, do you see any justice for the cancellation of our debts, or do you think it was just a ploy to extend our corrupt legacies to the present generation?

Avatar
Newbie
11 answers

Stanech,

Are you absolutely sure that the British Colonial rulers were generous, humble and wise, when they ruled Nigeria?

Normally most people tend to think of the British Colonial rulers as greedy, prideful and foolish, when it came to their leadership in Africa.

So this view of the British Colonial rulers for others, tends to lead most to believe that Nigerians act that way because of course, it was the way they were taught to act.

That is why this period is referred to as Neo-Colonialism, Colonialism with a Black face.

However, maybe you have compelling evidence that would in fact prove that the British Colonial rulers were generous, humble and wise in Africa.

Thus showing how Colonialist could not possibly be related to what happens now in Nigeria.

0
Avatar
Newbie

The first thing a person has to understand is that:

Slavery is easy. Being a free man is harder.

This is what the bible shows us in the Jews who wanted to go back to slavery in Egypt, rather than face the hard life of freemen.

So we as a people are always going to be faced with those who believe that we should go back to Egypt and who do as the Jews did in the bible and dream about the good things they had in Egypt as slaves.

Colonial/slave mentality --it's ancient.

0
Avatar
Newbie

The killing of twins happened in calabar, a town in present day Nigeria. How does that affect the history of the whole country?

0
Avatar
Newbie

""""Druscilla, yeah, the colonial masters treated our forefathers better than our leaders. Hmm, there is too much. How about the killing of twins and the abolition of human sacrifices? Colonialism put an end to this inhumane practises practised by our forefathers.""""

Ndipe,

How can one say: well at least the Europeans stopped the killing of twins and human sacrifices (which I question) but then ignore the many Africans that Europeans slaughtered during this same time period?

0
Avatar
Newbie

Nna, this discourse about colonialism has been rehashed on this board.

Druscilla, yeah, the colonial masters treated our forefathers better than our leaders. Hmm, there is too much. How about the killing of twins and the abolition of human sacrifices? Colonialism put an end to this inhumane practises practised by our forefathers.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Afeni,

Isn't it equally true though that the advancement was such a severe distortion of the Nigerian economy that it collapsed immeadiately when colonial rule ended?

For instance: I can take any ghetto family and advance them by making their daughter a top rate prostitute. However since this is such a distortion, when she dies of AIDS, the economy of the family will collapse.

Consequently, with the daughter dead and the father and brother and mother finally forced to make it on their own at jobs that pay less than 1 percent of prostitution. Their advancement may be slower than the past advancement but it is the better for the family, eh?

Fast advancement does not necessarily mean better.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Drusilla, the pace of advancement was a lot faster under colonization. However, Nigeria would have been a completely different country if the south was allowed to rule for majority of the countries existence.

In fact, Nigeria under colonization was known to give out financial aid to other parts of the continent. It is a pity that the British decided to punish the southern Nigerians because they advocated independence. They then rigged the census which allowed Northern Nigeria, a region that had very little if any western education, to rule the country. They also gave the North 6+ military bases and left 2 bases in the south western region, and 1 in the south eastern region.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Ndipe,

Please give historical examples of how the colonial administrations of Nigeria were better to Nigerians than those since?

0
Avatar
Newbie

When I talked about the installation of puppets in Africa, I meant the passive support that the West gave to despotic leaders in Africa that served their purposes, Abacha, Mobutu Sese Seko et al. The West actively participates in removing despotic leaders in South America. There is no such interest in Africa. In reference to OBJ, he certainly is not a puppet of the West. You got me all wrong because I was not talking about slavery. I do not want to dwell on the injustices of the past. Nigeria is at a point where we can make her look good again and that is why I believe the debt cancellation could not have come at a better time. Inasmuch as I don't like OBJ, he is at least trying to fight corruption in his own crooked way and at least a few criminals are facing justice. That is a good start. Except Tunde Idiagbon, there is no other Nigerian leader that I remember that has actively gone after known kleptocrats like OBJ. Whomever comes after OBJ has a point to start from. Also the incoming government would not be bugged down by debt management. And with oil prices at over $70 per barrel, how can we not get it right?

0
Avatar
Newbie

Could you expantiate on how the colonial powers have installed puppets at the detriment of the country?

Is Obasanjo a puppet of the western world?

How about we forget about the inglorious chapter of slavery for a moment and gear our mind towards developing Africa, beginning in our family? To be honest with you, I think that the colonial rulers treated us better than our present leaders

0
Avatar
Newbie

I believe the cancellation of our debts is good. Actually, it is our right. The Paris club, G8 and the London club knew that all the loans they were giving to Nigeria were being siphoned back into the banks in Europe and America. Also I believe there is justification for this cancellation because the colonial powers sowed the seed of failure in all their former colonies by installing and supporting despots to rule African nations, Nigeria inclusive. They set up all these puppets so they can continue to pillage and plunder the resources of africa. It is time for them to pick up the tab.

Beyond this however, it is time for us to take ownership of our destiny and make plans to make our economy strong. There is so much we can blame on the West and colonial powers.

0
Avatar
Newbie
Your answer
Add image

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.