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Churches Taking Over Company Warehouses - Good Or Bad Omen For The Country?

There is a growing concern about the alarming rate at which Churches are taking over company warehouses in Nigeria. Is it a good or bad omen? There are two sides to this equation. At one side is the economy which is losing the GDP from the company and its laid-off work force and on the other side of the continuum is the Church, which is reaping the gain. Has this dislocation in the economy benefitted/helped the country? Has the country really profited from this spiritual gain?

Let’s hear your argument.

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12 answers

Nigerians! wetin poster do you naa?

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This is an educational forum and we can all benefit (without attacking each other) from diverse opinions because nobody has a monopoly of knowledge. Please present your argument in a sensible and intelligent manner and don't insult others whose views are different from yours.

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@Abeem & Co travellers

Is it the church's fault that companies are closing shops? Would you have loved those closed warehouse to grow weeds with nobody occupying them? Does a warehouse growing weeds because there is no company to rent or acquire it profits the owner? Or are the churches taking over these warehouses for free? Aren't they paying for usage of these warehouses? If a company packed out of your warehouse, won't you be glad if a church take it over and pay your rent rather than leaving the place idle?

Sometimes, the human mind is so mischievious and hypocritical that the gullible minded could be easily decieved. Am sure it is not the rate at which companies are folding up that is your concern rather you hide your hatred for the church under your "pretentious concern" for the state of Nigerian economy.

I know you may be a sceptical christian or a non-christian for that matter, but rather than confronting the fact that the church is fast growing in Nigeria, you choose to tie your hypocrisy at the stake of the state of the economy.

I think you re a coward, you should have been courageuos enough to argue your point against the church rather than welling up emotions and sentiments to present a case to undiscerning public.

I have noticed this trend on Nairaland, giving the dog a bad name to hang it, unfortunately most people fall for this bait. It's a shame.

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The only growth industries in Nigeria today are internet advanced fee 419 fraud, the embezzlement of state funds, armed robbery, oil smuggling and the peddling of worthless illusions to the theocratically impaired, by bellowing confidence tricksters in clergy robes. 

Of all the above categories of crime, the only  "industries" that require weather-proof livestock containment enclosures are those concerned with the fleecing of large sheep flocks, namely the miracle churches, and this is why most of Nigeria's conventional factory buildings that have been de-activated by the total absence of electrical power in Nigeria have now been commandeered by those who live by theft in the name of God.

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I would argue the trend is an ill wind that blows us no good. It is a bad omen. But Churches are not to blame.

Under the present economic reality in the country, no industry can thrive. Power supply is epileptic; energy is more of a curse than a blessing as it is not always available; the road network is still in a dilapidated state in spite of the billions of naira sunk into it yearly. Is it then a surprise that industries are closing down and warehouses up for grabs by Churches?

In the last year or two, Michelin Motor Services closed down and moved to neighboring Benin (if my memory serves me right) because the cost of doing business has risen out of proportions that it only make sense to close down the factory due to high cost of energy and power to run their plants. At the last AGM of Dunlop (held in Dec 2008) the company sounded a notice to shareholders that it will be closing its plant. Why? The company can no longer operate as a going concern due to high cost of energy, the foot dragging of the Federal government to address the problem, and the influx of imported tires (through smuggling and otherwise).

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Which is what Karl Marx was trying to say in his oft-qoted phrase "Religion is the opium of the people". The simple explanation for this is what Naijaking1 is trying to explain away as Sociology 101 which means most religious people are the poor, down-trodden masses hence you find churches in their backyard.

Karl Marx believes that religion’s purpose is to create illusory fantasies for the poor. Because of the socio-economic realities faced by the poor, finding true happiness in this life remain a mirage, a tall dream. The poor then find comfort in religion and the sugar coated Reverend and Pastors convince them that this is OK because they will find true happiness in the next life.

For those people who are in financial distress, religion provides solace and succour, in the same way drugs rich in opium provides relief to pain-sufferers.

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Sociology 101

How can you tell when you're in poor people's neighborhood?

A church, a brothel, and liquor store in every block.

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Hey people need something to hope for. Churches provide that hope.

It's both a good and bad thing. They feel great on sundays and go back to a stagnant life the rest of the week.

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Nothing but the truth. It is really a sad situation.

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While business are failing in Nigeria and the Church continues to prosper even in the midst of great impossibilities what do you expect?.

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Na today?When there is no light to power the companies that make use of these warehouses the ever increasing no of churches and place of worship need to occupy these places to give people some 'sanity' of mind that life is still worth living in nigeria.

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