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Does The Illinois Governor Have Some Nigeria Blood In Him?

Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich is in federal custody on corruption charges, a law enforcement official said Tuesday.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/12/09/illinois.govenor/index.html#cnnSTCText

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According to the statement, Blagojevich is alleged to have discussed obtaining:

--a substantial salary for himself at either a non-profit foundation or an organization affiliated with labor unions;

--a spot for his wife on paid corporate boards, where he speculated she might garner as much as $150,000 a year;

--promises of campaign funds -- including cash up front;

--a Cabinet post or ambassadorship for himself.

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I think this guy should relocate to naija after serving his jail term - he'll rise to the top in no time!

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27 answers

Thank you ojare.  My point exactly.

He's only been this 'good' because he is in a system that almost works. So if this same governor was in Nigeria where corruptions shares your mother's other bosom with you, he would be in the same ranks with Ibori and the rest of them, if not worse.

Abi, what do the naija governors do that he has not done??

  - Sell a govt position - and talk about it openly;

 

  -  Have his wife start up an NGO so they can use it to steal govt funds;

  - Get some Chigaco Tribunue employees fired because they're writing against him; even in this recession period!

-  Restrict funds from the Chicago tribune because they wont do his will;

- Knew his line was bugged but did NOT care (typical naijaman's powerbroker move!)

Frankly speaking or typing, the guy na Olosa, barawo and gbewiri alltogether.

If he can do these things in America, imagine what he would do in a lawless country such as Nigeria - he might be worse than Idi Amin sef.

It is not about the system in Illinois - at least Obama came out of it nearly spotless.

This is about some corrupt man who would've been worse if he was in a lawless country.

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want to knw u.lilrene212@yahoo.com

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How did the lineage of the Illinois governor's genes evolve into a debate on Columbus Ohio schools

@toopic

If he can be this crooked in a system like America (this was a federal crime oo~)

God knows what manner of corruption he would get up to in Naija

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Columbus,OH has a better public school system than Chicago does and Columbus spends about half of what Chicago does each year( Cost per student in Columbus schools is almost half of what it is for Chicago schools). So I have little understanding how, even with all the money spent per student, you still see them as being left aside. Money from property taxes usually goes to paying for schools within districts. Should chicago then move money from rich districts to poor districts just so the city can boast of pushing more money, than it actually gets back, to the poorer areas? Is that really the way to get these people out of poverty? Is that really the only way to "get them out of poverty"? Those in the surbubs choose to pay higher taxes so they can have the schools they have now in their districts. How will the city explain this to them?

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what happens after the reserves become empty?

what if they can't support the school financially, should they be left aside while half filled schools are blessed with huge property taxes from their districts.

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All you have to do is read the posts to figure that out.

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I always expect to be offered lots of excuses for why people choose not to move across state lines, or county lines, in search of greener pastures. I am not convinced budget is the issue, deficits or no deficits. Sales tax was increased to make provisions for paying off deficits. Schools still get there share of the money. The people need to start pulling there weight, to some extent.

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The Chicago Board of Education approved  a record $6.2 billion budget yesterday while holding the line on property taxes for the first time since 1999.

The budget includes $5.1 billion in operating expenses, an increase of $200 million from the 2007-08 school year. The biggest increases were an additional $50 million for employee benefits, primarily pensions, and $32 million for salary increases.

Overall, the budget is $400 million more than last year.

Instead of requesting a property tax increase to balance the budget, CPS is using $100 million in reserve funds, which earned it high marks from The Civic Federation, a Chicago-based organization that was highly critical of a sales tax hike in Cook County.

"Chicago taxpayers can look forward to a respite from the punishing tax increases of the past year," says Laurence Msall, Civic Federation president, who appeared in front of the board.

"It's a very difficult time that we're looking at, dipping into our funds," says Rufus Williams, board president.

The district will also eliminate 489 jobs, and benefit from state funding that will rise by $98 million.

Despite that, the district continues to lobby the state for more funds and faces an opening-week schools boycott led by Sen. James Meeks to draw attention to the funding inequities. The district asked the state for a $180 million increase this year.

In all, the district will receive $1.9 billion from the state. Local property taxes will bring $2.2 billion.

According to research compiled by CPS, $9,689 is allocated annually for each student in the city, while allocations in a richer school district such as Evanston are over $19,000 per student. In New York City, more than $15,000 is allocated per student; in Washington D.C., it's $17,000.

"It is staggering how under-funded we are," says Arne Duncan, CPS chief.

Teacher salaries are budgeted at $2 billion, although Chicago Public Schools financial officer Elizabeth Swanson says hiring younger teachers saved some money. The district employs 22,800 teachers and 1,300 principals and assistant principals.

The budget also includes approximately $1 billion for capital-improvement projects, but that wasn't necessarily good news. Heather Obora, chief financial officer for capital projects, says there is a need of $4.5 billion for capital-improvement projects. For the fifth consecutive year, Chicago Public Schools received zero capital-improvement dollars from the state.

"You can only Band-aid schools for so long," Obora says. "We are only going to be compounding the problem as we go on."

That point was driven home at yesterday's board meeting, when parents of children attending Attucks Elementary, 3813 S. Dearborn St., complained that a faulty boiler has closed the building. Children were moved to a school about 1-1/2 miles south.

"We cannot fix the boiler. The expense is too great," Williams says.

http://www.chitowndailynews.org/Chicago_news/CPS_holds_the_line_on_taxes,15633

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because they could easily take section 8 from county to county. what happens if people can't make the move.   midwest US is the most segregated area of the US in terms of housing. easier said than done.

money they don't have. they would send their kids to catholic schools if they had the money.  

most of the taxes are earmarked to close budget deficits and not necessarily for education. chicago public schools are struggling. you can't compare the New Trier's and Peoria central's of illinois to chicago public schools.

definitely not the south surburbs which i went to school in. district 205 voted against a tax increase, these people voted against a tax increase that would have supported their kids. i believe the school has recently been taken over by state.

how do you know blagoyinka i mean blagojevich is my uncle.

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@post

Yes, he's bawomolo's uncle

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Possible solutions for parents who really care

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* Move to counties and cities where they can afford better living and better schools for their children. I believe the USA is open for persons who want better for themselves to do same.

* Work together with other parents to provide the schools with the money needed to deal with the situation

* Get more involved in their children's education to help eliminate cost of preventing crime in the schools; money which can go more into actually funding the schools.

Taxes already take almost 10.5 % in sales taxes from everyone -- highest in the country so far. Property and other taxes, in Chicago, are among the highest in the nation. I am not convinced the schools are necessarily underfunded. Those in the surburbs already pay higher property taxes. What more does the government need to cause them to pay so those on the south and west sides can have "better schools"?

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rod blagojevich came to power claiming to be a reformer, what part of being a reformer is being a worse governor than dan ryan? Meeks idea has merit, how do you expect these people to come out of a cycle of poverty if they aren't properly educated. you would end up spending more money putting this people in prison rather than given them a chance? the pennies you are saving would probably be stolen some day by the same kids you don't want to help. Rod blagojevich has turned a blind eye to the CPS thinking the problem would go away. RTA is badly mismanaged and in debt and somehow he has accomplished anything?

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I have lived in other counties outside of cook county, and I believe, from what I have seen, that many of the towns outside pull their own weight, economic hub or not.

The @Poster himself tried to draw a comparison between theaccusations leveled against Rob Blagojevich, and that we know of in Nigeria.

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If those schools had adequate funding, would there be crimes there in the first place?

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Personally I don't support the Meek idea about public schools funding for low income area schools.

I wont work hard pay more taxes and have my children go to South or West side school where the learn the rudiments of crime.

I don't like  Mayor Daleys policies in Chi town( He has towed by car like 3 time in Downtown probably due to the Olympic bid ) but it would be abnormal to compare Blagojevich to any Nigeria Governor.

Try handing over Illinois to Ibori for 2 years Chicago has a history of corruption not just Blagojevich Several governors have been indicted in the past

Can anyone tell me where Al Pacino operated from?

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chicago is the economic hub of not only illinois but the midwest. illinois can as well be a bunch of farms without Chicago and it's metropolitan area (exaggeration i know).

and no i didn't say corruption in chicago is the same as what we have in Nigeria but should Nigerian politicians be used for comparison? blagojevich's approval rating is at a low. that says a lot about what people in his state think about him.

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Well, you are free to believe that the level of corruption in chicago is same as what you have in Nigeria then.

He is governor of Illinois, not mayor of chicago. What is the mayor of chicago doing about chicago, no I mean south chicago schools? I am not completely in agreement with the "PUMP MORE MONEY INTO SCHOOLS" idea myself but I believe the mayor and meeks did say alot about working on the south schools last september.

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It doesnt stop with you, does it?

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Whatever Blagojevich's achievements are, they are tangential to the question of his alleged corruption.

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can you people list the "a lot" he has done.

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huh? what exactly has he done for illinois. budget deficit after budget deficit. in fighting within the state democratic party with him clashing with the speaker of the house. he has been under investigation since 2005 so the dude had it coming. Chicago ranks among the most corrupt cities in the US, the chicago police department has even been sanctioned by the UN. Rod Blagojevich and Mayor daley have not done much for the city. Attorney General Pat Fitzgerald deserves awards for fighting corruption in city council.

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If Blago was black, i wont have thought of him any less than having a Nigerian blood. He is a bold thief politician and our politcal elite back at home share same characteristics. What a Skank of a man, i pray he get 30yrs in prison were he belongs.

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Trace kei. The guy is a bloody Nigerian

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Maybe true or not, but you can help us trace the man's lineage.

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Be not decieved, even with the accusations, this governor has done quite a lot for the state since he became governor in 2002. You need to be in chicago to see how, even with the corruption that exists in government, things work fine. So, even though it is corruption, it is no where near the levels seen in Nigeria and most of africa.

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may be ill is equivalent to Bayelsa in Nigeria,

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Blagojevich has done a lot for Illinois. That the people dont even care that much.

Blag is not from the same place as Olaleye, Alamieyeseigha, Saminu Turaki or Nnamani

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