«Home

Energy Policy: Non-existent In Nigeria?

What steps can be taken to ensure contant power supply in Nigeria? At the moment, I know there is no constant power supply, but what can be done to correct this anomaly?

Thanks.

Avatar
Newbie
42 answers

@Post

Nigeria is far from setting up an energy policy to be honest and a lot needs to be done, conclusively, Energy policy is non-existent

As an Energy and Sustainability Consultant in the UK, i have been dreaming of the day an energy policy would be put in place in Nigeria

The problem is where do we start from as a developing country? What can we learn from developed countries and how compliant can we be?

It is imperative that all countries have an energy policy, with the continued threat of global warming, security of supply and climate change issues

I strongly believe, with an effective energy policy and strategy in place, Nigeria would improve tremendously especially in the areas of power supply

0
Avatar
Newbie

Nigeria uses Solar Energy as of the moment ' YES ' Everybody should note that the need for Nuclear Power Plant is necessary for multiple purposes like going to 'WAR' with United States/UK/FRANCEGERMANY/MIDDLE EAST/OR/CHINA?/ Without the country scared that she'll be Dead and then act like a Girl, 'NO' Nigeria is a Big Boy, She can't be attacked by any country/continent and she won't respond properly as Giant of Africa, What do you think? take a look at IRAN, normally they are not suppose to have Nuclear Power as Arabs that they are, They are far from Human, though they/whites/chinese/all came out we African the Origal human beings/Black/Brown People of GOD/ But they are too Violent, WHAT DO ANY ONE OF YOU THINK?

0
Avatar
Newbie

@kobojunkie,

That was my original plan of comprehensive promotion package when i come to Nigeria this March 2008 to have my presentation seminar in Lagos hotel conference in order to gather potential investors/buyers/clients who interest in hybrid-based renewable energy solution.

In my presentation seminar, I will have VISUAL SOLAR-WIND ENERGY MODEL DEMONSTRATION to give them BIGGER PICTURE of how it works with my flashlight as represent as a sun and hairblow-dryer as represent as a wind!!!

Right now i already made my mind!!!

0
Avatar
Newbie

Here is an idea. If you want to reach people in this day and age. There are so many ways to do it. You can put together your material: Document your lecture and print out the information, providing DVD copies of the idea for those who can get time to set it. Put together a comprehensive package and then find someone who will send you a listening of Nigerian Addresses, send the information to them and wait for call backs. It may seem a crude way to get to people but many Nigerians will be elated to recieve mail from some stranger who does not know them but wants to help them. If they have further questions, they can always reach you at some email, phone number or even website. 

I plan to use this medium to reach people in the near future and I will start my mail campaign, hopefully sometime in March ( different business completely)

0
Avatar
Newbie

@kobojunkie

Thank you for your word of encouragement. I already made my mind to start all over new research on island nations---It IS A MUST be poverty that need rural electrification solution (more specifically lack of electricity and shelter) for microfinance investment criteria requirement. But I will not responsible for hurricane-prone areas!!!

I already visited one of those Caribbean island few weeks ago on my 7-days cruise that touched my heart to love it. It is only 90 miles closer to the USA---Florida that I can fly from my hometown to that one of Caribbean more convenience than across half around the world, Africa/India where it is the poorest nations.

0
Avatar
Newbie

If you want to wait 2 to 5 years, it is your own time that is being wasted. Do not wait for the government to make anything available to you. Many have had to wait decades in America for things to get better in Africa, notice, most of them settled down and decided to accept that it might never happen in their life time. You need to go out there and get what you need. Does it have to be Nigeria?? There is India and even Mexico and other island nations right next door to the USA that need the same help. I say you seek a partner carefully as many have been duped and will be duped in the future.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@kobojunkie, based on Nigeria mentality, i will change my existing plan/proposal to focus on ONLY existing Nigerian homeowners or business owners who seek for the alternative renewable energy solution replacing their fuel generator with existing ulitity box installed provided by PCHN and are familiar with solar-wind generator installation with backup battery and invertor. They want PCHN-FREE on their property using solar-wind generator system with backup battery and invertor to enjoy their life.

I can educate them (existing Nigerian homeowners/business owners) basically on my presentation seminar how to avoid the ripoff locally solar energy distributors and how to manage the alternative hybrid solar-wind energy system themselves without relying on solar energy techinicans.

Not for my dream real estate investment proposal with microfinance project on largest hybrid-based renewable energy residential community, that i already wrote on my rough draft proposal for 160 new residential estates to be break down only 5 house per sell per year that depend on how fast the Nigerian homeowners to buy it. That is my dream that I must wait for Nigeria's NEW ENERGY POLICY for RENEWABLE ENERGY solution.

Therefore, I cannot do ALONE myself all the stuff like that. That is why i need one more business partner to work with me who is strongly familiar with Nigeria background/economic/real estate environment down there, strongly knowledge of hybrid solar-wind-biofuel energy system and must have valid passport with US VISA able to fly both USA and Nigeria every year on whole 3-months summer season.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I hope to move back for a couple next year myself and already making plans on how to purchase and set up a solar panel or two to provide the needed electricity needed for my domain. Doing business in Nigeria is not for the faint of heart at all. I mean it is not like America definitely but it is not impossible. Usually you hear that if you know "THE RIGHT PEOPLE", it will help but usually these so-called "RIGHT PEOPLE" end up being more like worms in your hair.

Not all Nigerians are all GLOOM AND DOOM. There are Nigerians who not only want to change things but actually push to get as much done as they can and actually take responsibility for their own past mistakes instead of blaming others. You will definitely find a lot of naysayers, that happens to be one of the major reasons why the country is the way it is right now. If you can and know how to contribute, please feel to do so but I ask that you do not go there expecting an atmosphere that necessary welcomes you and your ideas.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Well, for me, i feel not worth to come to Nigeria for my 2008 feasible study proposal on sustainable renewable hybrid (solar-wind-biofuel) energy for rural electrification solution along with six business associates, because of Nigeria mentality the way I see itself. This is my opinion to express my feeling, not you!!!!

Therefore, Nigeria is LONG WAY TO GO to improve their own needs!!!! I better wait until they come with NEW NIGERIA ENERGY POLICY on sustainable renewable energy, maybe next 2-5 years from today.

0
Avatar
Newbie

In an ideal world, it would be possible but Nigeria is not like the USA where you can set up business and not expect government intervention on some level. Infact, I beg to say that sometimes, they do so in order to frustrate your plans down there. To do such in Nigeria, one has to be ready to face walls and a lot of paperwork. Heck, have a lawyer or two handy should things get out of hand. I have thought about such but considering the restrictive business environment down there for those who may not have the "RIGHT CONNECTIONS", I imagine that being extra prepared for the worst is the way to go.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Yes you are right unfortunately @mrPataki. But in our rage, like I mentioned above, we should not blindly run into another trap and then regret that move in the end. Both sides have disadvantages but don't you think it is best we play the two sides in such a way that we get the best hand in both cases?? I mean sure the government controls policy but we now have a democracy, if we can get the government to bring in the private sector but still have the government to limit them so we can get the best at reasonable cost to the nigerian people, i think that would be the best way to go, until we get to a point where we can safely say, the country is now developed and able to handle itself maturely.

What I hope we avoid in the push is a situation where the we still have the majority of the goods consumed in the country, being made outside of the country and then having the economy remain stagnant even with all the development. Take the issue in the oil sector. Nigeria happens to be the 6th largest oil supplier in the world, yet we get so little of the money from our own oil and we have serious petroleum scarcity issues from time to time.

Anyway, I am still for the government helping the people get cheaper alternatives while it looks to broker a deal with any company that can help with the current situation with NEPA without loosing many of the controls it has now. I personally would like a situation where local companies and enterprises can come into the industry, and still have a chance to actually compete with the international companies already in the same field.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@ kobojunkie,

The Nigerian Government in itself has failed, so why entrust anything into its hand henceforth?

0
Avatar
Newbie

Most of Africa is barren ground. No solid structure as the one you ask for exists. Heck, the laws are right now not in the favour of foreign companies that would like to come in to take over. Privatization is good for africa but there is a deep part of us that moves us to want to still have control to a large extent over things happening. That, unfortunately has worked against us in the past but we hope to use it to our good this time around. I have seen what privatization has done in the USA, it works BUT we are not even close to where America is and I am afraid that if we let it all to the private sector, we will end up trading masters ( from being at the mercy of the government to being at the mercy of private enterprises) and that to me spells disaster in africa. We do need the government to ensure that the people get what they need at affordable prices. We do need the government to make sure that the people are not forced to go with what is offered without much of a choice. We do need the government to ensure that the people get a reasonable amount of the cake( profits) from these ventures that may come in to provide us with what we need. I don't see it doing Nigeria as a country, any good allowing say a company from china ( Note : disdain LMAO!!!) with all the shareholders in china, coming there to offer us goods and services and having all the profits pumped back to help the chinese economy while we are left with the trash in the end. I am afraid that we have done such in the past and it has not helped at all. We need the government to make sure that a substantial amount of that profit stays in the country. That will help boost our economy.

When it comes to privitization of the oil sector, I beg to say we take a toke from countries like Saudi Arabia.

Another reason why we need to have the government in the picture to provide some alternative for people who are seriously on the poor side. According to a recent article, we have over 75 million very poor people in that place. The government has to provide some sort of backup to help level the playing field. If the rich can afford utilities what happens to the poor?? The government has to come up with a scheme that provides for them and at the same time does not squeeze much from the rich to do this. I am not saying a welfare program like that in the USA But a system that will ensures they are not left behind cause they are unable to afford the new utilities.

I can not verify any of the claims you made there. I mean we have even had a NUCLEAR department for years, does not mean we have nuclear power in place or anything.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Also I already did post the link about Nigeria Embassy's Investment Opportunity to detail about Nigeria Privatization program, but Nairalander insulted me not to believe what the website say where I found.

Here is link i previously in the past. Keep in your mind this website i don't think has been updated lately.

Nigeria Privatization Program

http://www.nigerianembassy.nl/invest_privatisation.htm

Nigerian Investment Promotion Commission

http://www.nigeriabusinessinfo.com/nipc.htm

Privatisation: Opening A Window Of Opportunities In Nigeria

http://www.nigeriabusinessinfo.com/privatise.htm

Electricity Generation

http://www.nigeriabusinessinfo.com/energy.htm

0
Avatar
Newbie

Can you all tell me what is the definition of the Privatization?

Here is the online defined at source cited (privatization.org):

A very broad term--but most simply, privatization is the transfer of assets or service delivery from the government to the private sector. Privatization runs a very broad range, sometimes leaving very little government involvement, and other times creating partnerships between government and private service providers where government is still the dominant player.

As Government Executive put it,

[list]

[li]Merely defining "privatization" is difficult. In its purest form, the term refers to the shifting of the production of a good or the provision of a service from the government to the private sector, often by selling government-owned assets. Clinton Administration officials took this rather narrow view. "When we talk about privatization, we don't mean contracting out," said Elaine Kamarck, who headed Gore's National Performance Review. "We mean purely divesting the government function."[/li]

[li]Most definitions of privatization, though, are more expansive, covering virtually any action that involves exposing the operations of government to the pressures of the commercial marketplace. That would include everything from contracting out janitorial services at a federal building to selling off the Naval Petroleum Reserve.[/li]

[li]The broader definition of privatization also includes a wide range of public-private partnerships, such as voucher systems. Even the creation of federal corporations, quasi government organizations and government-sponsored enterprises is often filed under the general category of privatization. In such organizations, though, it is often difficult to tell where government ends and the private sector begins.[/li]

[/list]

Can anyone to draw an organization chart of Nigeria Government system for us to look at?

I will show you our USA Government organization chart LATER!!!

In my opinion, our sustainable renewable energy privatization will be work specifically with the Nigeria Energy Department and PHCN's Solar Energy Engineer Department to form the new Energy Policy in order to be submitted for approval before proceeding our sustainable renewable energy resolution. The privatization will form its own certified Nigeria Incorporation producing the maximum of shares (stock) toward Nigeria stock buyers and investors. (I have a Nigeria friend who is currently employed with PHCN working with private government partners to develop Solar Energy department---he said those partners are whites---pardon me for race issues, I wonder if you all are aware about the inside of the PHCN procedures/organization chart)

YES---PHCN has own Solar Energy Engineer department somewhere in Victoria Island, Lagos---would anyone kindly to verify this statement is true by my Nigeria friend claimed? Unfortunately, I did introduced this Nigeria-friend (PHCN Solar Energy engineer) to my Nigeria business partner down there in order to set up meeting in person face to face---he (PHCN engineer) disappeared. That is why I am very skeptical of this Nigeria-friend I am very cautiously who I talk to/introduce to.

Anyway, the privatization stocks will be responsible to dividends toward those Nigeria stock buyers/investors EQUALLY, unlikely any government.

My rural Virginia hometown, i read the subscribed Electricity Power Privatization financial assets magazine that contains 50-pages of listing the names of all more than 250 private investors, power subscribers including all the 9 region officers to be split sharing the dividends distribution publicly per every quarter (every 3 month each). Keep in your mind that my rural hometown has only 11,000 population of both residents and businesses---very small town.

Then why can't we create our sustainable renewable energy privatization without relying on government involvement TOO MUCH in Nigeria? And establish to manage our financial assets outside of the Nigeria such as Swiss bank, Cayman Island bank, Aruba bank or Panama bank to protect from the corruption/fraud. Can we? Or is that complex to create one?

0
Avatar
Newbie

I don't believe privatization is necessarily the pill we need to heal the situation in that country. A Combination of privation and serious government work, maybe but privatization alone?? Nah!!! I am not in the country right now and I tell you what, I see it a nightmare for me to get back down there and see exactly the same trend I see here, happening over there. I would prefer Nigeria does something similar to what south africa has in place when it comes to the economy.

0
Avatar
Newbie

By grid here i mean the distributon channels what happens when a customer is tired of one provider and wants to change power company, the new company will need its own distribution channel as well, so should we have several distribution channels??

0
Avatar
Newbie

There need to be all kinds of power options in nigeria from hydro to solar to wind to new innovations even underground. And not because we are desperate means the prices should be in the sky. I also think our water systems should be checked like a correct and massive drainage system based on local government areas. We either have sun, wind, or rain which makes us a suitable place to have all kinds of systems.

It should involve the innovation and innitiative of everyone from the top to the bottom. Is all these give the traditional ruler the money here for transformer or giving someone that doesn't have any bit of electrical/science /engineering skills that have made us stranded for a long time now. The right people and their affliates need to be given the contracts.

0
Avatar
Newbie

In fact there are investors who can setup their Energy grid without the need for PHCN.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I still do not agree with you, dissolution of PHCN does not pave way for efficient power generation and usage for Nigeria. Let it be still functional as it is, but give room for independent power distributors to come into play, create their own level playing ground and the Government acts as a yardstick for regulating and monitoring their various activities and operations.

This is where we need Energy Policy for the nation, which at the moment is not existing. Creating well designed modules for Energy Usage and Energy efficiency gadgets without the adequate policy instruments in play is just a ballyhoo which is well noted with Nigeria over the years.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Nice discussion so far, but the point is that without the privatisation or selling off PHCN what i call Kill, the energy sector electricity will not be attractive to investors.

For the telecomms sector to have succeeded, the new entrants didnt need any inputs from NITEL as they started their operations from scratch. With electricity its not so, theres a national grid and distribution lines, PHCN does it all now, and has not been able to achieve anything. Yes its all we have now, but if its failed why should we hold on to it. Its operating as a so called commercialised ventrue (from the days of privatisation and commercialisation by IBB) its commercialisation element just means that the govt reduced funding and asked the parastaatals to increase cost of its products to make more money, but hey that hasnt worked.

Its bitter and hard but PHCN has to go, that parastatal has to be sold off. Am calling for its dissolution, it should be divided and allowed to keep only distribution (pray its able to handle that), the technicalities of generation has proved too dificult, today its watertoday, tomorrow its Gas, it lacks the technical competence and can't be bothered to improve. The solution of creating a level playing ground can't work with PHCN the way it is, the cost of entry is too high and not attractive to the investor.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I rightly understand what you mean here, but I must say there is a good example which is the Mobile telecommunications industry, where it was privatized, and an open market came into play, creating room for accountability, a Nigerian owned company also came into play and it is even getting more better with time.

I have no problem with this people coming in and bringing in their technology, and there is also room for an independent owned power generation company owned by a Nigerian is also given the right to contribute, with time, I tell you more Nigerians will arise to take over the Nigerian market too.

Jamaica today is learning to be independent from Brazil. Even Bangladesh is also working towards that, though it is rather a slow pace for them, but it is possible. There was a time Netherlands depended on Germany for power generation, even UK too once had it, but today they all stand as independent power producers and willing to share the knowledge with developing nations.

Nigeria should never be ashamed to do such. Hope you understand me on this.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I don't believe Nigeria can afford to scrap NEPA at this point since it is all we have FOR NOW. I do believe we need to pursue alternative sources while we learn how to maintain what we have and then consider privatization at some point. We already have seen what privatization has done to the cell phone world. We need to wait a while and make sure we have good laws on ground before we embark on such moves when it comes to privatization of power industry. I mean right now, a bulk of the profits already go outside of the country. Such revenue could have aided in building our infrastructure many times over.

Another problem I have with privatization is that I see that as a fast way of sending the country deeper into a huge hole. We already have countries like China, India and Brazil, and so many others all trying to take over one part or another of the Nigerian market. Last thing we want is a situation where we have power supplied to the country but the bulk of the revenue generated from these industries being funneled out of the country. I don't know if you understand what I mean. If you do not, ask and I will explain.

0
Avatar
Newbie

I dont totally support you on this buluti. Selling off PHCN or Nepa or whatever they call themselves is not the solution to this menace. I know the frustration NEPA melted down on me over the years, but selling them off is not the solution to this issue.

Why sell what does not exist in the first instance? I still insist there is no backbone upon which energy production and consumption can thrive on in Nigeria. If I as an investor decide to come into Nigeria today to invest in the power sector, there is no legal framework which I can work with to create a sustainable process in matters of Energy usage in the country.

I dont blame NEPA or PHCN at all.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@ kobojunkie,

Bless heavens for a forum like this where like minded guys can get to meet and discuss possible ways to foster things ahead. From your write up, I seem to summarize it as: The government creates a level playing ground, where investors can come in set up these power farms and create some incentives and the citizen are allowed to pay for the electricity consumption they use.

I totally agree with you on this. It will create an avenue for people to use power efficiently as you are going to be billed for the energy consumption you actually use.

At the moment, I am into talk with some people here, who are interested in investing in the power sector in Nigeria-Africa. I hope we do stay in touch often though.

Here is a link on going about Wind farms:

http://www.windpower.org/en/core.htm

0
Avatar
Newbie

@ Kobojunkie so what are you suggesting, we should keep what has failed?

I am at a loss please, how is selling of NEPA,  what we have been doing in the past, have they sold NEPA before, please tell maybe i don't know, then you don't understand privatalisation or de-regulation, allow other companies come and operate.  I said kill/sell off PHCH, is that what you did in the past. De-regulate the power industry, is that what you have done in the past.

Who is suggesting to put billions into NEPA, where did i say so??

Please read my contribution in this the thread below.

http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-93748.32.html

0
Avatar
Newbie

You are trying to say we should go back to exactly what we have been doing for the past how many decades and expect it to work this time around. I am not for scraping NEPA but I do admit that NEPA has so far failed the country and pushing in more billions into that project at this point and expecting the people to wait decades yet again is not in our good at all. We know the world is pushing for clean energy sources, We know we can not refine that which we have and pushing for us to do that now is again not new and not going to help the economy right now, maybe in the next 20 years, but some of us are actually sick of being told every other year that Nigeria will be better in a DECADE.

Right now we have access to solar and wind energy. As soon as the States/Country develops laws that will allow individuals/business to set up Power Farms and run them at little or no risk of being weighed down by the same government, I believe we will be better able to deal with the problem we have in the country right now. It would even be better if the state takes it on itself to run such projects involving the people all the way. I used to push for rebuilding of the NEPA stations and Nuclear Energy but I have come to a point where I realize we do not have time to wait for those anymore. We are already well into the 21st Century and are 50 years behind most of the developed world.

0
Avatar
Newbie

This Energy issue in Nigeria in my opinion is due to metal laziness. People dont want to think, we just want to copy. Its not about copying wind here or solar there its about analysing whats cheap to us. I suggested in the other post a total departure of what currently exist, you can read my contribution there.

Nigeria is blessed with energy resources that are natural to us, eg Gas am not saying Gas is it, but we need to discover the one thats for us on a national level, it might well be "Nuclear", lol, but really we need to take into consideration our pecualrities and design our Energy policy. This PHCN issue, its time to totally kill that company, i mean totally not NEPA to PHCN, i mean it should not exist, sell it off. Let other companys generate this power, PHCN just can not, its doing too much, it will distribute, it will transmit.

Look at refinning, we cant get it right, because govt is refinning, soon now some will say we should conserve energy like my friend in the other thread i.e. manage fuel, maybe copy Europe with the car share, cycle, public transport initiative. We need to design a framework that is enduring and it starts from killing PHCN, private and sell off the monster. Talking about Energy is beyond electricity what of refining, whats happening to PH and kaduna refineries??

0
Avatar
Newbie

WIND TURBINES

==============

http://www.awea.org/pubs/factsheets/10stwf_fs.PDF

http://www.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/windpoweringamerica/pdfs/wpa/34600_landowners_faq.pdf

http://www.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/windpoweringamerica/large_wind.asp

http://www.bwea.com/ref/faq.html

0
Avatar
Newbie

I was one of those who disagreed with you and if you check my post, after researching the state of the country and coming to realize that we do not even have the money to pursue the building of nepa plants or nuclear plants, I have come to the realization that solar energy might be a cheaper, and more viable way to go.

Nigeria has a lot of space for which to set up Solar Farms. Like your investigation has revealed to you, doing business in Africa is not same as it is here in the US. To Teach the people to build for themselves, there is the question of availability of raw materials to power such moves. Even those materials need to be purchased and I am sure there will spring up suppliers promising good quality materials but doing no such in the end.

I do believe that if the government takes it on itself to set up these farms on a large scale basis, it would be better.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Easier said than done! On what are we going to use to generate this 50,000MW of yours?

0
Avatar
Newbie

God is not going to come down and fight any physical battle for us. It is left to us as Nigerians to collectively work towards achieving this.

0
Avatar
Newbie

@kobojunkie

Great you talk about solar farm! However you should make aware the fact that last February 2007 i did try suggesting Nairalanders about proposing the wind-solar generators for their electricitifion resolution. Please read my peviously thread in the past where 50% of them were disagreed and another 50% of them agreed with me. Very few insulted me thinking that I was scammer because of my bad grammar writing skill. In fact that they, Nairalanders, did not know that i have hidden physical disability. It doesn't hinder my helping unfortunately people out making my dream become reality someday.

Here is link: http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-40919.0.html

I presently work so hard researching online finding reasonable wind-solar generator prices. I found out that there has already established their own licensed solar-wind distributors locally in Nigeria as well as South Africa from USA and UK wind-solar generator manufacturer headquarters. I mean there are about 25 Nigeria/South Africa licensed solar-wind generator product distributors locally---but I find lot of resident/business Nigerians have complaint against local Nigeria/South Africa licensed solar-wind generator distributors on the ground of lousy customer service, defrauded and poor technicial support.

That mean I will have to create my own hybrid solar-wind generator presentation seminar simplified coming to Nigeria (specifically at Lagos hotel conference) to educate Nigerians how to avoid being ripped off from local solar-wind product distributors and take seriously responsibility of maintaining solar-wind generator system without relying on distributors after installed their solar-wind generator products at their home or business as well as to prepare for my feasibility study proposal to update my rough draft of my rural elelctrification system on hybrid solar-wind generator solution proposal.

Finally, I already have arranged accommodation by my Nigeria business partner and six business associates who support me all the way but I have not yet set the date when will I come to Nigeria as soon as I find a travel companionship---I HATE FLYING ALONE especially I am female and hidden physical disability I have. My business partner and associates HAVE NOT SEEN MY WRITTEN PROPOSAL, i refuse sending them personally in order to protect my idea. The fund will be come from the international microfinance investment as well as private venture capitalists.

0
Avatar
Newbie

We do not have the money to build hydro and nuclear plants to support the need of the entire nation right now. After further research into the power situation in the country and the technological advancements in the world we live in today. I have come to change my mind when it comes to having the country adopt the new wave to install solar panels for use in supplying energy to the people. People need Electricity and energy NOW, not in 10 years. The energy from the sun is available NOW for us to start tapping into it. I would say, that the country as a hole should adopt initiatives that would enable it build and source power to it's people, utilizing solar energy.

 

I believe the current state of things needs to be dealt with as an Emergency. I move to have states set up Solar Farms to temporarily/permanently alleviate the problem. The current situation hampers economic group on a huge level.

0
Avatar
Newbie

If we are to be seriously interested in Electricity and power not only for Homes but also for Industrial development we need minimum, I say minimum 50,000MW.

Uk with population of 60Million are on well over 80,000MW.

we are a nation of 140million so do the maths, in any event the 50,000Mw is assesed on our present need so we many even need to do ajdustment to provide for our future needs.

I say GOD will fight our battle for us in this country and all those politicians and executhieves will be put to shame.

Nigerians we are on our way for the children of lucifer to be terminated in their ways.

GOD bless us .

0
Avatar
Newbie

@mrpataki

Well said. But don't you think 50,000MW is too much?

Too much? when city of Tokyo alone is on 75,000MW

50,000MW will not be too much for the whole of Nigeria

0
Avatar
Newbie

Well said. But dont you think 50,000MW is too much?

0
Avatar
Newbie

let me start by saying that Energy policy- non exist in Nigeria? that was the question right.

I think there is an energy policy be it that it is unwritten. The policy is -give when you can or when somebody makes noise and we all shout UP NEPA.

Mark my words, we have sick people in our nation leadership. They don't have vision accompanied by persuasion.

I don't know why OBJ failed to sort Power problem out in 8 years but there may be reasons behind it, part of it as I undersood it, is to do with the 'cabal' or mafia who has interest in other things like Diesel, Generators etc. and to them Power solution is against their selfish interest simply because they are silly and can't see the big picture.

Nigerians are intelligent enough to know that the people who are troubling Nigeria nad power supply are not up to 1000 who are holding the country into ransom.

I will soon post some more details of grassroot campaign going on and we shall find ways of 'taking over' this sector into our hands.

The truth is that we need at minimum 50,000 MW of power anything short of that is a recipe for disaster and joke of the highest order.

let us call a metting of wise people and stop eating from the pot of foolishness. 2020 is a complete joke without a comprehensive, deliverable and attainable Energy policy. There has been no single country who develop industrially without power. Period.

May God continue to help this great nation.

0
Avatar
Newbie

It is good to mesmerise people with interesting write-ups and good jargons of mathematical calculations as to power generation, when there are no existing energy policies in place to adequately ensure that efficient power generation becomes a reality.

0
Avatar
Newbie

OKay, let me complete the article.

As I've always said, if power problem in Nigeria (which is the major problem right now) can be solved once and for all, that will be the beginning of new things to come for us.

0
Avatar
Newbie

Oh please, this frequent jeering reference to Dr. Watson has become hackneyed already.

@ topic,

Patnership with the private sector should do.

Here's an extract from The Guardian of October 30, 2007.

Note: Not a total privatisation, but public-private sector patnership.

0
Avatar
Newbie
Your answer
Add image

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.