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From Number Three To What?

From number three to what? 7/6/2007

The 1999 plot

THIRTY-three years after the assassination of General Johnson Thomas Umunakwe Aguiyi-Ironsi, the first Igbo to assume the leadership of Nigeria (Abia State), the stage was set for the return of the Igbo to the centre.

It was in 1999. The previous year, after the death of General Sani Abacha, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) was formed. Among those at the helm of leadership was Second Republic Vice President Dr. Alex Ekwueme.

In the build-up to the party’s presidential primaries, he was also a leading aspirant.

Then, things changed dramatically. Some Northern power brokers and strategists decided that a Yorubaman must succeed General Abdulsalami Abubakar.

They justified their action on the fact that since Chief M.K.O. Abiola, a Yorubaman, died in the cause of actualising his June 12, 1993 presidential election, a fellow Yorubaman should be supported to occupy Aso Rock Presidential Villa.

But, this was a plot within a plot. The real reason is that since after the 30-month civil war (July 6, 1967-January 15, 1970), there has been an apparent mindset by the Hausa of excluding the Igbo from Nigerian leadership.

The February 1999 PDP convention was fierce. General Olusegun Obasanjo was eventually given the ticket. And he won the February 27 presidential election.

Zoning of offices

It was obvious that the Igbo had been wronged. Politically, they were shortchanged, so to say. Since the South-West produced the President and the North-East the Vice President, the kingmakers decided that the Igbo from South-East must produce the number three citizen – Senate President.

2003 contest

Ekwueme also showed interest in the 2003 presidential election but it was obvious that he had lost steam simply because the incumbent Obasanjo was interested in second term. The January 4-6, 2003 PDP convention was a fait accompli for Obasanjo.

The Igbo once again lost out in the power calculation but still retained the number three position.

All-round tripping

It is interesting to note that the presidency and vice presidency stayed in Ogun (South West) and Adamawa (North East) from 1999 to 2007.

The first Speaker Salisu Buhari from Kano was booted out after two months in office over a certificate scam. Ghali Umar Na’abba, also from Kano succeeded him and was in office till 2003. Alhaji Aminu Masari from Katsina also stayed in office from 2003 to 2007.

But it is a different ball game in the upper chamber.

The Senate presidency seat rotated among the five states in the South-East within eight years – Evan Enwerem (Imo), Chuba Okadigbo (Anambra), Anyim Pius Anyim (Ebonyi), Adolphus Wabara (Abia) and Ken Nnamani (Enugu).

A new order

In the build up to the April 21, 2007 presidential election, the Igbo again rose to the occasion.

At least, four former governors – Orji Uzor Kalu (Abia), Sam Egwu (Ebonyi), Achike Udenwa (Imo) and Chimaroke Nnamani (Enugu) campaigned vigorously for the number one position.

Some of them even struggled to be nominated as the running mate to the PDP candidate Umaru Musa Yar’Adua.

To get the Igbo votes, the two leading opposition parties picked their running mates from the zone.

Senator Ben Obi from Anambra State was the running mate of the Action Congress (AC) presidential candidate former Vice President Atiku Abubakar.

Chief Edwin Ume-Ezeoke, the national chairman of the All Nigeria Peoples Party (ANPP) who hails from Anambra State was the running mate to Major General Muhammadu Buhari.

In 2003, Buhari also picked Okadigbo as running mate.

They could not have their way.

Now, after Tuesday’s inauguration of the National Assembly, the Igbo are nowhere being near the first four positions in the country .This is the new calculation: North-West – President; South-South – Vice President; North-Central – Senate President and South-West – Speaker.

In the present scenario compared to the 1999-2007 zoning structure, North-West has moved from the number four to the first position.

The South-West is now occupying the fourth position.

The South-South and North Central which hitherto were not in the picture have moved to numbers two and three positions.

So, where is the South-East? From number three to what?

Even the North-East which is not among the first four has produced Baba Gana Kingibe, an indigene of Borno State as the Secretary to the Government of the Federation.

In the first week of the Yar’Adua presidency, no Igbo man was appointed to any top position.

Deputy Inspector General Ogbonnaya Onovo was appointed to step into the shoes of former Inspector General of Police Sunday Ehindero as the most senior police officer.

Forty-eight hours later, he was replaced with DIG Mike Okiro, an indigene of Rivers State from South-South.

Lagos lawyer and activist Chief Gani Fawehinmi took up the fight of the Igbo on Tuesday when he condemned the shoddy treatment meted out to Onovo.

He wondered why the headship of the force, once again, eluded the Igbo, "despite their sterling credentials."

"If Onovo was qualified to be a Deputy Inspector General of Police, why should he not be qualified to be an Inspector General of Police? I demand an explanation from the Yar’Adua administration."

He said: "The development was a distrust of the Igbo, as a psychological after-effect of the civil war in which the rest of the federation engaged the secessionist Igbo in the eastern part of the country for three years of bloody conflict.

He warned that the trend, unless checked, constituted a threat to the unity of the country.

Many Nigerians are quick to say that the PDP has not been fair to the Igbo. But are the Igbo fair to themselves?

In 1998, the Yoruba were united in their determination to produce General Abubakar’s successor.

In fact, it was a field day for the politically-conscious inhabitants of the South-West geo-political zone as the only two candidates – Obasanjo and Chief Olu Falae are Yoruba.

But are the Igbo united in their quest for the number one position?

During the 2007 presidential race, Kalu was a lone voice.

Even the apex Igbo socio-cultural organisation Ohaneze was divided.

There was no central command like the Afenifere of 1998/99.

It is believed that individual interest and ambition is the albatross of the Igbo quest for the presidency.

For the next four years, they are nowhere near the first four positions. And this may last for eight years.

But now, there is a ‘future’ problem. Yar’Adua has the constitutional right to contest for a second term.

If the courts do not upturn his victory, it is believed he may be in office till 2015.

The political history of Goodluck Jonathan is a public knowledge.

As deputy governor to Diepreye Alamieyeseigha, he was loyal to a fault. And "goodluck" follows him.

When he became the governor and he got the party ticket for re-election, he was suddenly given the vice presidential slot.

Today, he is the vice president. Given his nature, he is expected to be loyal to Yar’Adua and protect the interest of the Northern elite.

In 2015, the presidency will come to the South.

And naturally, he would vie for the post.

If he wins, since age is on his side, he may remain in office for another eight years.

After his tenure, the presidency will return to the North.

So, when is the turn of the Igbo?

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59 answers

I have said my mind on the Igbo, times without number. What else is there to say? Chrisokw made a statement I found offensive, and my response was directed to him, in kind. Go through his previous posts on this site, he has complained about marginalisation. That's why when he started his next post on a rather rude note without any justification, by claiming I was 'crying more than the bereaved,' I replied him in kind, using a sarcastic tone.  

And if you don't remember anyone complaining about the Igbo not getting the presidency, ask adconline. He has asked me that question before, on another thread, even though the post he made at that time, is not what is being debated here.

Finally, we were talking about an Igbo presidency. There are Igbos in the South-East & in the South-South. The only thing is that in the South-South, the Igbo are just one of the several other ethnic groups that abound in that region.

That is probably why other South-South ethnic groups, initially opposed Odili's candidature for the presidential elections. If you go through the statement credited to J.P Clark, he made it quite clear that they would like some of the other indigenous tibes in the South-South to pick up that ticket, because if an Igbo candidate like Odili is fielded by the region, they would loose by the time the South-East fields its' own candidate.

So, there is nothing 'mischievous' in my previous post about Utomi. Read it again. And read all the ones I made from the beginning of this thread. If you do not understand the point I was trying to make, kindly ask. Yes, he is from the South-South, but he has never denied his Igbo roots. So what's the problem? If he gets into power, he will be there as a South-South Igbo man. That is pretty much obvious. I voted for him in the last election, and I would gladly vote for him again and again, if he comes out to campaign for the presidency a million times over.

In his campaign, he showed that he has wonderful ideas, and an enthusiasm to move this nation forward. Unfortunately he campaigned on the platform of a party that lacked a nationwide spread, as well as popular grassroots support.

Knowing his style, I am sure that he will not make that same mistake again, when the next elections come round. And I will be on the road, rooting for him.

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My friend, better say your mind on the Igbos and stop this patronizing statements with subtle arrogance and nonsense.

What is your tribe if I may ask? Let the Igbos be as I don't remember reading where anyone was complaining to your about the Igbos not getting the presidency.

Is Utomi from the South East? What yardstick are you using to make a case for Utomi as representing the Igbos if not for mischief?

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Who the hell are you? Some tin god? Why do you overestimate yourself?

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My brother, am not crying more than the bereaved, to use your own words. Why should I? No one should just disturb my peace with cries of marginalisation, or any talk that they have been schemed out of power again, when elections come round. Period!

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Quit crying more than the bereaved. Bury your own dead. Ok.

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Ok. it is still early in the day. For now, let's allow Yaradua to rule or is it misrule. 2015 is not tomorrow, ok?

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Nobody is insinuating that you should fight. All am saying, is that you should not fold your arms and sit back, thinking that someone will call you meekly to say, 'oya, come and take.' Do you remember the 2004 PDP primaries? What happened? After the primaries/elections had been won and lost, some folks came out to say there was an understanding or a gentleman's agreement that the presidential candidate would come from the South-East, because the South-West have already had a shot at it from 1999-2003. What happened? No one came out to confirm or deny if it was true, and OBJ had a free reign again, till 2007.

As for the rotational thing you keep talking about, some folks have said there is nothing like that. Others have said yes, it exists. There is a cacophony of voices on this issue, and very little proof on ground to support the statement. Until it is gazzetted or it becomes part of our constitution, I choose to keep an open mind about this rotation matter. Don't forget, it is easier to change an agreement within a political party, than to change a section of the constitution. Am sorry if it doesn't align with your views, but that is my own take, on this issue.

Please read this link. You will find two dissenting opinions about the rotational stuff. http://www.loccidental.net/english/spip.php?article25

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You have inadvertently answered the question on rotational presidency. The ND (Clark and Co.) knows Odili is Igbo, so would not allow him to usurp their own time to rule. Which means there is sometime like time existing for each zone to lead. Igbo's time will come when it will. We will not fight for it the way you keep insinuating. Moreover I'd rather not, than have an incompetent thief help add Ndigbo to the list of those who have misruled Nigeria as presidents. For now I am happy nobody can call Igbos incompetent at the federal level. When thetime is ripe, the right Igbo will take Nigeria to th epromised land. It is our calling, I believe.

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No, the Niger-Deltans believe that there are a lot of minority tribes in the ND, and a candidate to represent the South-south zone where they are located, should come from one of these tribes. They believe Odili is from the South-East, which is already a major bloc. And if the South-East also presents its' own candidate for the presidency, their own zone will be disqualified during the primaries, as Odili will be viewed by majority of the other ethnic groups more as a South-Easterner, rather than a South-South indigene. Kindly read J.P Clark's views on this matter, as well as those of other prominent ND politicians.

The North fought for it behind the scenes, schemed and strategised for it and ensured they did all they could, to make sure it went back to their region. Ask those who know, and do a quick search on news reports, prior to the elections. Read the commentary of those who were part of the political intrigue, during the PDP primaries.

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I support the south south to get it first when it comes to the south again. After them the north and finally comes the Igbo. I am that patient. By which time the thieves like Orji and Uba may have expired politically. This case is closed.

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The content in bold refers, what exactly is your point? That an Ijaw/Kalabari person being selected instead of Odili will make the person a non Niger Deltan?

Is the issue of rotational presidency strange or new to you? Unless PDP goes under in the next couple of years I doubt if any political party can challenge it in any major election.

And if SS takes the slot when the presidency comes back to the South what's the big deal? Did the North fight for it before it was zoned to them this time around going by your suggestion that the Igbos should fight for it before they can see the presidency?

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Laudate,

Can you slowly tell me you are not arguing that if the military does not cease power, and  if the PDP continues to rule based on their rotational presidency, that the Igbo's turn will not come? That others will rule and the Igbo will be denied?

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I never told you I had red herrings talk less of throwing them.

Ok, to answer your question I suggest you ask others to help provide the phone numbers of Alex Ekwueme and Chukwuemeka Ezeife so you can ask them why they were contesting with Yoruba sons after the presidency had been zoned to the South West.

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Thank you for telling it as it is, jare! This was what I was alluding to, when someone called me. . . a moronic spoiler, and advocated for 'turn-by-turn' presidency. It will suprise those who are waiting for turn-by-turn presidency, that the cup will pass them by again, when another election year rolls by.

If Abiola had not contested for presidency in June 12, 1993 and won a resounding victory which was anulled, only to die in jail while trying to reclaim his mandate, do you think OBJ would have profited from his goodwill when 1999 elections, came round?

It was because of Abiola's death, that other ethnic groups thought the South-West should be given an uncontested shot at the presidency. Even at that, the same South-West elctorate boycotted OBJ in 1999. It was the Northern establishment that put him in power. Like I keep asking, if OBJ had not formed alliances with them prior to 1999, would they have come together to put him in Aso Rock? Don't forget, that this was a man who had just come out of prison, and had little or nothing, to his name. Even when rumours were strong that he would run for presidency in 1999, he scoffed at the idea initially, by saying "How many presidents do they want to make out of me? Afterall, I have been a Head of State, once before." Again, when Yakubu Gowon initailly indicated an interest to run, OBJ said "Maybe there was something he (i.e. Gowon) forgot in Dodan Barracks when he was Head of State, that he now wants to go back and take." The rest as they say, is now history.

When 2004 came round,  the Northern oligarchy helped to put OBJ back in the saddle, again . This time around however, OBJ had appeased the South-West by placing some of their prominent sons in his cabinent, and trying to mend fences with them. He also struck a mortal blow at the AD, infiltrated their ranks and made sure the party went through so much squabbles, that their centre fell apart. So a lot of South-Western politicians decamped to the PDP and worked to give him victory, in their territory.

Now, someone believes that the presidency would rotate in a turn-by-turn fashion, when other ethnic groups have not gone to sleep and are busy strategising on how to rotate it, to their own region. Even the South-South, is not folding its' arms. Prior to the 2007 elections, when Odili was a strong contender for the presidency at the party primaries, some elders from the Niger-Delta objected to Odili being picked as a candidate from their zone, because they preferred a minority tribe like the Ijaw/Kalabari etc. to field a candidate to represent the zone.

Am still waiting for more people to call me names, for chronicling this series of events that have dogged the outcome of attempts to vye for the presidential ticket. Every good student of Nigerian politics, knows full well that history often repeats itself. God dey!

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You now see why no Yoruba contested under PDP but despite the so called freedom/advantage or 'chance' given Yoruba under the PDP in 1999 Ekwueme contested. Why?

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@Sleekdot,

Sure you are right about PDP zoning. As long as PDP is the ruling party (and it appears they will remain so for long, given the rag-tag nature of the opposition parties) the zoning is guaranteed. Everyone has a right to contest for positions they are qualified for, but the PDP as a party knows where they have zoned the presidency to. You can waste your time and money if you choose. Nothing for you. Ok?

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The zoning is a party thing PDP zoned to the North that was why no Yoruba dragged it with them on the platform of PDP, all parties have their own but since PDP is the most powerful party we assume the zoning of PDP is the zoning of Nigeria.

@ Afam,

Can you answer that question without throwing red herrings?

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So, in your wisdom OBJ gets out of prison, without any political platform gets into PDP and wins the primary. If he was that good then the issue of 3rd term would have been like moi moi.

It is either you are playing games or you really do not have any idea of what has been in the public domain for over 8 years now.

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What were all the southerners including Yorubas, who contested for the presidency in 2007 doing, knowing that it was the turn of the north? Why did Abubakir Rimi and other Northerners contest in 2003? They were all just bluffing. It was clear who was to rule in 1999, 2003 and now 2007.

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It is more like mischief.

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If they have actally given the South West the right to produce the president in 1999 then what was Alex Ekwueme looking for at the PDP primaries and Ezeife at the AD primaries

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I am surprised that a Nigerian is in the dark about the arrangement to allow the South West produce the president in 1999.

Thanks Chrisokw for your very informative and reasonable suggestions as regards the Igboland.

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There was no way Ekwueme would have won. The Yoruba, through an Hausa-malleable OBJ, was programmed by the Northern-dominated military to rule in 1999. Nobody is a baby here. Ok? And in 2003, incumbency was the factor.

As for AD, a tribal party, anyone contesting under such platform has no chance in a tribal enclave like Nigeria.

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If Ekwueme had won the primaries or Ezeife would you still have said that they gave the Yoruba's the slot?

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Except there is military intervention, it must get to the turn of every zone to rule. You cannot stop it.

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Did the Yoruba put OBJ there in 1999?

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The Yoruba did not fight for anything concerning the election in 1999. Where? When? Are we not all Nigerians then? They were simply compensated based on June 12. If the military did not give to them, there is no issue of fighting for anything. Stop this mischief, Now.

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The Yoruba's fought for it remember June 12 even in 1999 The north conceeded but OBJ had to defeat Alex Ekwueme in PDP and Olu Falae had to defeat Chukwuemeka Ezeife in the AD not on a platter of gold and dont be too sure that it would get to your turn if you dont fight for it; you know what happened to Azikwe and Ekwueme who thought it would naturally get to their turn.

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Nice contribution from the last poster, except some misinfo here and there. When Ekwueme vied for the vp, ZIK contested like Awo, as a president via the NPP. Akinloye, a Yoruba was Shagari/Ekwueme's party Chairman. Do not try to make out as if all Yorubas were for Awo, whereas Igbos refused to stand behind Zik. That sounds mischievious and misleading.

I have also advocated that Igbos should throw the idea of Nigeria's governance into the refuse bin until much later in the future. Let's get back home first.

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I am not Igbo but try and read with an open mind I think the fate that Igbo's are suffering is the handwork of their rulers who traded the yearnings of the populace with the minor political appointments.

During the 1st republic Tafawa Balewa contested, Awolowo contested but what did Igbo's do they(Azikwe) went under Tafawa Balewa as number 2 citizen,  fast forward 1979

2nd republic Shehu Shagari contested, Awolowo contested  what did Igbo's do they(Alex Ekwueme) went under the North again as number 2 citizens , fast forward 1992

3rd republic During the 1992 elections the front runners were Umaru Shinkafi and Adamu Ciroma (N.R.C) and Shehu Musa Yar'Adua and Olu Falae (S.D.P) where were the Igbo's probably waiting for number 2 post again before IBB disqualified oldbreed politicians.

Forward 1993 During the 1993 elections the candidates were Bashir Tofa (N.R.C)and M.K.O Abiola (S.D.P) where were the Igbo's they (Sylvester Ugoh) went under the North again.

As a result they have been taken for granted that we would always give them something

You know it was as a result of M.K.O palaver that the south west had a shot at it.

Now the south south becauseof its agitatation is ahead of Igbo's in the pecking order now

Imagine Yar'Adua uses 8 years and Goodluck if he behaves well uses 8 years then power to the North for another 8 years before coming South Probably South East that is 24 years wait!!

With people like Orji Kalu who are now not afraid to stand alone the future is bright for the IGBO's. Igbo's should stand alone and not let the ruling parties use them to gather votes and later give them minor posts instead form a party of their own and vote for it massively and stay with it. It would be better to be an opposition that to be in the ruling party without any say in the governance.

I am sorry if I offended anyone with this post just my feelings

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Stop being a moronic spoiler. There is turn-by-turn presidency. This means that when it gets to your turn , you have it on a platter of gold, just like the Yoruba and the North did, with everyone else knowing it was their turn. Even if the south south gets it first, by virtue of the VP being with them now, it will certainly get back to the south again and then the south east will SIMPLY pick it up. You cannot stop it when the time comes. Or can you?

Every state or homeland in Nigeria (whether Igbo or not) needs developing. Everywhere is practically underdeveloped. Thanks.

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Yeah, Duke is a good example, and there is a lot to be gained by developing one's state or homeland.

Not wthout working for it, or strategising and planning for it, as well as building strong alliances with other ethnic groups, across different parts of the country. Why? Because politics is a game of numbers. Simple.

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Thanks Chriskow you can not be more correct than that.

The Igbos should simply take the back seat in National Politics and spend more time developing our land. See the vigour which with Donald Duke governed his people? that is what I expect of the South East governors. Simple.

Presidency will come naturally at the appointed time and no one will stop it when the time comes.

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Nice point chrisokw.I have always wondered why ibos being so capitalist and entrepreneurial continue to live in such enviroments as they do.Trade and business is what is moving the advanced countries forward[china,japan] and developing their societies as a result of effective tax management and other corporate trends in society

It seems the answer is that maybe less than ten percent of ibo business is done in iboland and a fraction of the remaining may just decide to build a mansion back home.The rest of society is left with the famous nonchalant political and traditional charlatans that are found all over iboland instead of reaping the benefits of their God given talents

As for the presidency i have to agree with mcren that tribal unity may not be necessary to achieve that office.Luck and circumstances may be more important.Why was yaradua chosen-because he didnt want it

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I am a bonafide Igbo. At this point, IMHO, we should take a very back seat from the national governance and let the misrule continue. When it is our turn, I dare say that no mountain can stop us. Thanks to rotational presidency. For now, we should rather concentrate on two things. Firstly, how to bring all the Igbo in the south east and south south under one more cohesive umbrella; and secondly, addressing why Igbos take their thriving businesses to Lagos and other parts of Nigeria, leaving their teeming youths in the lurch with respect to employment, or having them migrate to go work for Igbo in Lagos, Kano, Abuja etc. If those businesses are repatriated to Igboland, people who need their services will look for them wherever they may be. After all, Nigerians go abroad to buy certain goods and services, not to talk of coming to Igboland, which is a stone's throw away. If those businesses are repatriated, the economy of the south east will be boosted beyong imagination, the population now depleted by massive human movement to other parts of Nigeria will rise again and we shall once again be a very proud people. You may or may not know this, but many business people in Lagos, Kano and Ibadan for instance, including many non-Igbos, travel to Aba, Onitsha and Nnewi, to purchase goods they re-sell in Lagos and these other cities. So what is this stupidity about Igbo unbridled migration to such places?

It is better that we get it (Nigerian leadership) later than having thieves like Orji Kalu, Ojo (sounds Yorubaic), Iwuanyanwu, Uba, etc, who currently bestrode the Igbo political landscape become the so-called Nigerian president of Igbo extraction. That Igboland has the least poverty index in Nigeria (according to data from the CBN and FOS, is not magic. It stems from sheer strenght of character and unprecedented industry of individual Igbo families, in the face of a gregarious and rampaging bull of a Nigerian state.

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I have nothing to gain by criticizing tgbos or any others bro, I just try to express my take on issues whether correct or not, when I am wrong I try to humbly admit as such. Granted that it takes more than unity at the zonal level to achieve the presidency, but I believe it plays some role in eventual outcomes.

I would like to discuss what these real issues are, I have simply said what I think to be one possible cause, the issue is still very much open to debate and I'd like to hear your views.

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Ohaneze is not the issue here, the issue is how united are the Igbo leaders in the PDP and how effective are they in achieving their demands? PDP's overwhelming dominance (whether legitimate or otherwise) means any major decisions taken within it are automatically reflected nationally.

In the SW, whenever Obj gave a directive, all the party men rallied around to make it succeed. the elements who were not agreeable were either convinced or kicked out of the party. Same for other zones within the PDP. but the SE's case is different - Ken Nnamani is singing one tune, Chimaroke another, Sam Egwu another, some out of personal interest, some out of genuine national interest, the motive is not the crux of my argument here, but the lack of unity. It was only when the issue of the zoning came out that we began to hear murmurs from senators -elect and house of reps elect (who are mostly newbies with little clout party-wide). they do not have a united voice within the party, that is my take on the matter.

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O boy na big insult they take insult igbos.They have no regard for us

They feel we cant fight back[and so far,nice thinking]

Why should Yoruba who occupied number one be given number four

Northeast that occupied number two are number three in the execuive[kingigbe]

Speaker of reps was to be an ibo position but we were intimidated and thrashed out

How can we recover from this shame as we have been left completely underrated

O my fellow ibos,home we go to our minority land[and to think we founded this country]

Nigeria's major tribes are now Hausa,Yoruba and Niger-Delta

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Well said Bro. Orji Kalu and Governor Nnamani should have used their positions to provide basic neccessities such as good roads, health care system, water supply and an atmosphere for economic growth. Unfortunately, they decided to line their pockets with public funds and end up playing a cat and mouse game with the EFCC!

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well you have a point, about the Obj thing, but take what happened in 2003 for example, the AD (foolishly) refused to have another candidate simply because 'one of their own' was already contesting.

Even though the North failed to achieve consensus between Atiku, Yar'Adua and Buhari, it was obvious that most of the governors in that zone were overwhelmingly in Yar'Adua's court.

the second point you made is also important, the Igbo need to seek for true partners outside their zone and come up with a better slogan than 'its our turn' when seeking the presidency.

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Well you will not convince people who think what makes them happy is to blame you for all the country's problems to be your political ally.

My strongest wish and point here is, we have a greater task as a people, which is to rebuild our zone and look after one another like civilized society does. .

When Nigeria is ready to play fair politics we will know

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@Initiator

Before you intergrate into the larger Nigerian context, I think it is good to identify the real issues why the Igbos are falling apart! You cannot move further unless you take it one step at a time. There lies part of the reason why the "intergration" process keeps hitting roadblocks or "marginalization" as some of you call it.

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@ MILITIA yes we are'nt comparing tribes as you said but you cant talk about igbo unity without situating it within the larger Nigerian contex.

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Haba!! Na for where you see 5 governors in 5 years? Don't exaggerate o!

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@ GNature

Can't be done! That is why I do not like this rotational business!  Let the best person take the position by the dictates of the people.  But in Nigeria, the people have no elective power and tribalism is every thing.  Also, things only get more fragmented in Nigeria not downsized!  I say we will soon have 45 states with 10 geopolitical zones!  It is a dilemma indeed!  Any solutions?

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This is the issue at stake here.

There are 4 most powerful positions in Nigeria's political setup :

The President

The Vice President

The Senate President &

The House Speaker

Now, Nigeria is split into 6 geo-political zones:

The North has 3 zones:  North west, North Central & North East

The South has 3 zones: South South, South East & South West

The problem now is, how do you split these 4 positions among these 6 zones ? So far, 2 of these positions are shared equally between the North and the South. Unfortunately, 2 zones are always going to be left out because there are only 4 slots.

How do we remedy this situation ?

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there is a basic lack of unity and focus amongst the igbo political class - Kalu was a lone voice, so was Pat Utomi, no widespread Igbo support for these men.

how can you expect much from a PDP that is not too happy igbo given their 'performance' for PDP in the last election, out of 5 states PDP won only 3, two went to PPA.

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@Initiator

Okay! Call it rubbish talk oh. You missed the point. We are not making a comparative study in tribal dysfunction! Look the topic well oh! Na Ibo we dey talk about! When we get to other tribes, we will identify and analyse theirs too!

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Sorry to say but @ militia this is another rubbish talk. Has there been unity in oyo state? Has there been unity in ekiti state? Has there been unity in plateu state? Even if igbos presented one candidate in the last election she'd not've emerged president. The emergence of presidents in nigeria takes more than ethnic concensus and y'all know that. To alledge igbos are the primary cause of their lot is to wish away the ethnic complexities of the nation. Nigeria's not controlled by ethnic groups. She is controlled by individualls.

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