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GOV. Fashola's 600 Days In Office : What's Your Comments So Far?

Hi Niaralanders . .

Today marks Gov. Fashola's 600 days in Lagos state.

i personally think he's done well in this state so far in even it requires him stepping on some people's toe to achieve a aim we all know is the best for us all.

he implemented tax

create new road

repairs and maintain bad roads

schools and library

health sector improved and "NEPA" as well.

drop your comments here. . . CHEERS

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39 answers

i bet that's why Former LAG VC wanted a shortened tenure for these dudes.

This tier of government (assuming they were pro-active) would have made Fash's work easier.

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And whom should we direct our angers? Who's responsible for the councillors? Who's their boss? When the head is rot --- you know the rest.

That's what's happening in Nigeria so stop supporting these disabled government and tell us not to expect more.

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I really don't think tax payers money will go to road maintenance after it has been built. Maintenance is from toll gate fees (correct me if i'm wrong). It is simply business and seems a far better and more stable alernative to government maintenance.

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Uumm . . . This is assuming that in the past construction and maintenance was always dealt with as different contracts. I am not sure of that actually. I remember Julius Berger used to hold most of the contracts (maintained included) in Lagos. There was always the problem of funding the contracts and maintenance and so construction problems.

I get what you are saying now but not sure how this deals with the underlying problem of corruption which happens to be the root of the problem in Lagos and the rest of the country, when it comes to maintenance of infrastructure.

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According to my understanding, instead of a situation whereby you have a lot of private companies now there were instead prominent families after independence, not just in lagos but around the country. What you have now however is companies with finances that are not treated as family affairs, but companies that are responsible to the investors in the company. This is to address the issue you raised of focusing on the work at hand as oppossed to going for political ambitions. The companies aren't all (with few exceptions) one man shows anymore.

On your second issue i think you might have misunderstood the financing arrangement i was speaking of with regards to funding. Unless i am mistaken, most toll gates (if not all) in the past collected toll for the government and not companies because mostly government put itself in the position of maintaining roads and hence the normal inefficieny with regards to Nigerian government running things just fell into place. However, with the contract arrangements now, a company is contracted to build a road and as part of the contract maintain the road, not government. What is being paid for is build and maintain. The highway on the other hand goes a step further (perhaps because it wil be more costly to maintain) and after being built, toll is collected, which goes to the company that is meant to maintain the road. The toll is used for both revenue for the company and road maintenance. Does that now make sense? Putting the responsibility of maintenance and hence sustainability of the infrastrucure in the hands of th private sector and not government as had been the case before of government hiring private companies to build and then leaving out maintenance. A more sustainable aproach as opposed to the case of giving government the money to do it when private companies can do it more efficiently and sustainably (and will want to due to it being a source of income and profits and the legal obligations a contract creates), without disruptions from changing of administratons.

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Save me. When councilors earn more than professors, why can't the LG chairman be accountable for his locality?

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Well, i am not the governor so i can't say what there stand is on this. However the roads that are going to be tolled are well plyed roads which will likely become even more used with good infrastrucure in place, hence good amount of income to spend on maintenance of roads. However if a major refurbishment needs to be done it will make better sense to just contract the job if it is that huge, if not i don;t see why such can't be handled with revenue from toll collection.

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I don't doubt that there has been infrastructural upgrades in the past, however what i see as different (and perhaps i might be wrong) is the direction that has beeen chosen to accomplish such with this present administration. The direction has been one of enticing the private sectors to participate in development by successfully arguing a financial and economic case for such investments. These investments will yield returns for private owners. Case in point which i have used previously, the BRT scheme. The government created the infrastructure (good roads, denmarcations, traffic laws and penalty for driving on BRT lanes, the depots which hire a lot of people for maintenance, etc) and banks bought the buses. A good example to use is the strategy that is apparently being employed for the planned 8 lane highway (if i am not mistaken), private companies are going to operate and maintain the highways and collect toll from it. A lot of the roads being rehabilitated have been contracted to companies and the contract includes maintenance of roads for a time period (significant number of years which can be renewed). The direction taken is one i agree with because it presents a situation whereby the onus won't lie on government to continue to maintain these roads since such responsibility will lie with the private sector which will in so doing make profits for themselves and provide well maintained roads and hence a service to the public. Thesame goes with the ferry service (not bad looking at all, not the canoes i was expecting lol), the whole idea of putting responsibility in the hands of private investors who will want to do the job well due to contractual obligation and in the interest of making profit. This creates a more sustainable approach whereby the state of the infrastructure won't alter with every change in government.

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Exactly the reason why I believe we need to deal with Education of the people, in Lagos, with the same vigour, or even more than we are currently dealing with infrastructure. Like I have been saying over and over now. What Fashola is doing today was done by Marwa; was done by many governors before him. Look into the history of development in that state. This same has been done before. I would rather we deal with it in a way that ensures continuity now, rather than wake up tommorow to a new governor and the same old cycle.

The governor can definitely do more than one thing at a time as you said, and so the reason why I can no understand why he is not able to tackle education just the same way he, according to you, is tackling infrastructure and the environment. You state that finances might be problem but I seriously doubt that as there is no data that shows that their is enough money in that state to work on the projects he has and continues to so far but not on education an issues that directly affect the people, in the same way.

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the school is in a bad state now i guess

Fash needs to be there ASAP.

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waoo, da state of that school is bad oo and I would love to provide them with chairs etc they need. Please provide me with more info about the school

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@B.O.S.S. we are talking of a state and not Nigeria. As far as i am concerned i am yet to see any proof that Nigeria actually has a functioning president. Nigeria might have huge financial resources but does lagos have such? Nigeria has huge financial resources but is it willing to use such to develop and progress? The financial resources of Lagos in my view can be more than quadrupled if it can become a viable economic centre in the world.

@Kobojunkie i don't know about Ibadan, but Port Harcourt seemed to have that kind of buffer in place whereby there was development etc and the name "Garden City" was actually warranted as relics from that time will show. I can't vouch for wether it was due to a solid democratically and politically savvy populace though. Whatever happens though, a more sustainable means of development will surely be to have the people back in control because then their is coninuity in developlent though direction might change.

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Nah!! We have always had the corrupt ones among us. We just never allowed them as much leeway as we do today. We had seriously corrupt folks back then. Another thing is I can not say the same was the case in other states in the same country back then.

I mean all you had to do was drive up Lagos Ibadan rd then to see the big difference between how things were run in Lagos and the neigboring states. It was clear as day. Lagos was different, in that regardless of what was going on at the national level, we were able to insulate our system as much as we could, for as long as we could afford.

We has serious boundaries that could not be crossed back then, no matter who you were. That changed when government took over and starting trying to do it all.

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kobo and sky blue, healthy debate u guys are having. sky blue, the money for maintenance most likely would be generated from toll. some portion of the toll might go to govt as revenue. but in a case where theres major work to be done. e.g. road expansion. does the govt cuff up the funds or do we increase toll fees?

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You do have to admit that the Nigeria of then, ripe with promise and possibility is a different one to what it is now. Too many sectors are vying for top priority. If we are to be honest, Yar Adua should declare emergency on every single sector, but given the limited resources I will take a compromise as long as something is done. To be frank i wouldn't mind if Fashola took the direction of education and health as the very topmost priority because such too will obviously have its benefits. I just think that the route of aggressive infrastructural development while putting other sectors along side this is a much better compromise as it could fast track development. All in all whichever way, it would be a compromise for now at least due to limited resources. And i cannnot believe i put Yar Adua and the concept of development and progress in thesame sentence.

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Lol. . .I have never been against re-building of infrastructure and cleaning up Lagos. I have lived through most 12 governors in that state, most of whom have come in to re-build infrastructure and clean up lagos. We have had so many tacky catch phrases to go with each of those plans too. Seems the lagos is mega-city. I have seen this sort of thing happen too too many times that I long for the good old days when the people were in charge and the people were put first before anything else. That is what made Lagos the city it used to be and in my opinion, the only way we can restore that city to what it used to be and more. Back then there was a lot of focus on ensuring the people had the basic; this was the environment businesses needed and so we had so many international companies flock in by the year, hiring local talents. I mean back then it was rare to see an Indian or persons from foreign countries. I remember my dad had a south African Caucasian for a driver. That was the way it used to be. WE RULED lagos. We made the decisions, and government worked on making sure we had the essentials. The police in Lagos knew their place. People obeyed traffic without being cajoled into doing it because they were not neglected; they understood they were a part of the process – the community.  I mean you drop trash and someone from behind would pull you aside to talk to you about that. Oh Lord!! What happened to us!

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LOL, deal. As you can see, i do get where you're coming from just as i think you get my direction also.

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I go for us agreeing to disagree at this point. We have gone through this enough for each to know where the other stands. I agree that all you list above are needed but I don't believe they are basic issues that need to be tackled first, and so yes, our priority lists seem to be different still and may continue to remain that way, even after this thread is sent to the archives.

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When i refer to the term environment with regards to businesses, industries and the conomy i refer to all the factors that will make such function effectively and hence infrastructure in this sense is part of that environment. Infrastructure like transport - good roads, rail system, ferry system, etc - that might make businesses like parcel delivery etc more efficient and hence create more jobs (just one example from the top of my head). Infrastructure like good security around the area, constant power supply, water, etc. You get the gist.

Environment on the other hands covers more than infrastructure and can benefit from infrastructure, for example, good roads and traffic lights and obeying of traffic signs due to law enforcement, etc, would hopefully mean people spend less time in traffic and more time at work, a more productive economic and business environment foremployers whereby more man hours can result in greater productivity. Security will give confidence to smaller scale businesses whereby they are able to expand and not have to pay money to agberos and touts etc, and not fear so much that their savings and profits will be robbed from their bank like is currently the case in a lot of Nigerian cities, the security creates a more stable business environment, etc. Hence i will say infrastructure has a lot to do with a better business and developmental "environment". Funny enough i will also add education and health to this environment (moreso education) to serve as a means of a regular supply of freshminds and skilled people to drive the economy and enhance growth and development of all sectors. However, this to me is not an issue of one being important and the other not being important, it is about choosing a compromise for the current situation that is; whereby all sectors are run down. Education will serve as a driving force and is vital and important, sure. However, lack of graduates is not the pressing issue right now in terms of poverty alleviation and develpment, is it? See what i mean? I am in no way against education or health, neither do i say such are not important, but given the circumstances, a good way to fast track development and create more revenue by expansion of businesses and industries and hence investments and revenue for the government is to focus on creating good infrastructure and attracting investors to invest in important services like transport, etc. Education and other sectors can be addressed along side an aggressive charge at infrastructural development.

Am i a bit clearer now?

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I don't know why people continue to adress the issue of infrastructure as mere beautification or as you put it "mowing the lawn", well, i guess we are going to have to disagree on that because i simply see it as much more than that and as a very important factor to development. The difference in views seems to be the issue of priority. The thread is referring to Fashola's own term in office, right? The rot in the educational sector and all other sectors was not as a result of this administration's neglect. Government's responisbility might not be to create jobs for the masses, but i will argue that one of government's role is to create an environment whereby job creation is able to flourish as a result of businesses, industries and investments moving into an area. You would argue that government's responsibility is to provide people with necessary tools needed to create jobs and get jobs and while i will agree to that, I will say it falls along side with the issue of creating an environment which makes those jobs and application of skills possible and able to flourish in the first place. I on one hand will put the issue of environment on a slightly higher plane of importance at this point in time and given the situation whereby all other sectors are suffering; I will do this because there are already a lot of graduates whose skills are not being utilised in the first place, graduates who are selling and trading banana and all sorts; i will do this because i think it is a way of fast tracking needed development in other sectors. Providing an environment for these graduates to open more value added businesses and an environment which attracts investment is vital because then perhaps this backlog of people leaving institutions with degrees but without jobs can begin to get cleared up. I don't believe this is putting the horse before the cart as i am not saying education should be ignored, i just think certain things at current should take precedent, not because they are necessarily more important than education but because such can at least create economic relief and address the poverty situation while also serving as a panacea to fast tracking development and creating more revenue for government to more agressively tackle other sectors like eduction and health.

Strictly speaking i have not been to Jo Burg, but i have been to Durban and what i see there is a situation whereby a lot of big businesses like hotels, etc flourish however the issue of smaller businesses are not addressed. The micro finance initiative advocated by Fashola whereby smaller businesses are able to get loans and hence compete with bigger businesses, as well as the huge number of graduates in Nigeria without jobs are perhaps some off the reasons a comparison with JoBurg might not suffice. What such if successful will create is a situation whereby indigenes are also able to grow and develop their businesses and hence employ more indigenes. What such will also do is attract more diasporans to investment possibilities in Nigeria. You might argue that a lot of these graduates will require training but it does not take away from the fact the workforce is there and ready, all that is required is conditions suitable for better businesses both internationally driven and local to thrive.

With regards to the whole movement of businesses from lagos island to VI, again you assume that when i speak of "environment" i speak of greenery and planting flowers. I keep on saying it is much more than that, it is infrastructure, security, economic climate, etc and hence goes beyong beautification. Hence it might not be superficial as you might claim.

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@Skyblue, Lagos does not have an endless supply of money is reason why Lagos OUGHT To focus on prority projects. And regardless of how we each choose to order our priorities, there are those amenities that remain top on every priority list, which ought to get more attention in that state.

Now, I know you are very impressed by the man, so I am not trying to argue with you on this. Just saying that if I had a house that is falling to pieces;no electricity and no water and I have no food, but about 50 bucks to my name. I would focus less on mowing the lawn, repainting the house, and installing a security camera. There are priorities like getting a job, getting some groceries, going to the hardware store to buy tools and supplies for fixing the house up, re-connecting electricity, getting heat to the house etc.

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@B.O.S.S the simple truth is that your view on lagos' priorities is different from that of others and you'll just have to see it that way. If i were in the governor's shoes i would also make infrastructure the main priority. Not saying nothing else is important but you speak as if lagos has an endless supply of money and hence everything can be addressed by the government all at once with government money. This seems absurd. Creating good infrastructure (roads, good transport and transport network, good environment for busineses to flourish via security and a cleaner and more aesthetic environment) isn't as pointless as you make it seem especially when you adress it as "planting flowers". The under of bridges have been cleared and dark places have been lit in order to reduce crime by making former hiding places of hoodlums open. I just wish when people debated these things they presented a more wholesome picture so that we can have a more substantial debate. Attracting private investment and creating an environment for small and more economically viable businesses than just street trading to flourish is vital for the development of lagos. This again is priority the way i see it. Take for instance the BRT scheme, the buses where provided by banks and not by the government, all the government did was build the infrastructure and facilities. We underestimate how much the private sector actually adds to a society's economy until you have a case like america and one more pronounced in england whereby businesses and shops start going bust left and right.

If bigger businesses are attracted by the environement created then won't that mean more tax and hence more revenue at the disposal of Lagos government to tackle other more pressing issues more aggressively than perhaps at present? When all road works are completed it will mean faster transit times to work due to less traffic caused by bad roads, flaunting of traffic laws and things like oshodi market, hence businesses and employers will be getting more more man hours from there employees. Such environemnts will also make businesses which were not feasible in lagos before more of a possibility. All these things and more which i won't go into now, can help to create more jobs and more businesses and are factors that add value to the economy that selling banana on the street can't add. See how the term environment then becomes more than just "planting flowers"?

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i don see o0o . . . but the GOV. himself commissioned some schools recently.

maybe it hasn't got mile 2 area yet.

im sure he's working on it,bcoz he's a thinking GOV.

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YES, they sure do get taught under those conditions as well. im not against the BRF but when people sing praises nonstop and never see otherwise, call whoever questions anything pessimists/naysayers/fill-in-the-blank, etc etc etc. i cannot help but get wired up.

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Never was my candidate but has tackled issues aggressively and straight-on-point.

I remember him cancelling a commissioning ceremony 'cos the contractor only did a "Work-in-progress" job.

AM still disappointed that even if he still makes "noise" about the mega-city brou-haa-ha, he has failed to tackle the commercial buses' unofficial "tax-collectors" popularly called agbero. I bet these undesirable elements aren't part of any megacity in this world.

This has continued to fuel speculations that these agberos are civil servants!

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Does anyone remember Jakande's record? we are hearing good things about Fashola's so I give him KUDOS

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he is doing an amazing job, I was impressed with da looks of Lagos this past xmas, Kudos to him

If more governors can emulate 4rom him, Naija will be fine instead of dem stealing or keep on planning without executing, lol

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No be you @B.O.S.S . I been dey ask the person wey dey try yarn say im master Fashola be the best governor lagos don get so far. I wan know how long im don live for lagos wey im come dey yarn that kin okpata for here! roflmao!!

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As long as I keep gettin the news that it takes 3hours to drive from Ogudu GRA to Ikoyi (instead of 45minutes or thereabout),

As long as my fellow Nigerians cannot afford to even take their relatives to the General Hospital in Lagos,

As long as there's never light in my neighbourhood for more than 10hours a week,

As long as there are still many boreholes capable of swallowing a car the size of VW Golf,

As long as the kids in Ketu Alapere, and the kids in kosofe highschool alapere ketu keep sitting on the floor,

As long as there're still a minimum of 10,000 beggars on the streets of Lagos,

As long as people are still suffering the pollution of Lagos,

As long as my friend told me they have to put the bin in the boot of their car and transport it from their house in Gbagada to Lagos Island (in oder to empty),

As long as there's still no water and people have to turn to smelly pure water sachets,

As long as people still have to trek miles in order to fetch water,

As long as people (ladies especially) are still scared to walk outside after 7pm, etc, etc, Fashola has done jack sh*t,

Mind you, these are the basics (or aren't they)?

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BOSS. . . Fashola isn't relenting either.

he's about the best Gov.Lagos ever had

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@Debo,

Well,everyone has the right to drop it comments here,for me,i think he tried with NEPA or its called PHCN now in my area,we got a new transformer and power supply is constant.

maybe some areas had not got the impact yet,but c'mon its just 600 days,about 700days to go for 1st term in a city like Lagos,he tried i must confess.

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What has Fashola done with regards to 'NEPA'?

I remember Tinubu made efforts to get the Enron now AES barges running. With improved relations with the FG and partial deregulation of the power sector, I would have expected BRF to fast-track the Chevron power project in Ikorodu and even invite other parties in to build. Lagos is hungry for power and a great deal can be achieved by focusing on that.

That said, I think he has performed well - he appears to have a vision and will not be easily thrown off course. A lot still needs to be done - improve medical services, begin to develop satellite towns to ease pressure on Lagos itself.

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@ Must a far,

c'mon its just 600 days. . . he had accomplished many things within 600days unlike the 8yrs Tinubu spent.

i believe that before the end of the first term,he would have turned Lagos into something else.

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the kids in kosofe highschool alapere ketu sit on the floor so wat has he done with education. i can provide picshures if you need proof ok he has done some stuff but its not everything he has done i'll give him 2 cents for.

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He has planted flowers all over Lagos and still hasn't improved the health conditions of the people. I guess people have to smell the flowers to breathe in fresh air, pullution is still a nuisance.

Overall I'll rate him 2/10 because he's not tackling the basics. He just wants big projects so he'll get a big applause; not good enough.

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600 days in office. Let me see. . . .  Compared to his predecessors ( those who have come before him in the last 17 years in the same state) I will say he has done a good job, but I expect him to improve on his record. Tackle basic issues more aggressively than he has done so far.

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To clear up misunderstandings here. Mind explain what you mean when you say ENVIRONMENT and INFRASTRUCTURE?

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