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Is This Really The ''first Storey Building In Nigeria''?

When foreign tourists visit Nigeria, they are often taken to Badagry where, among slave-trade artefacts and other attractions, beaming tour guides proudly showcase to them the so-called

''FIRST STOREY BUILDING IN NIGERIA''

According to Nigerianwiki:

''The ancient history laden structure was erected by the Reverend Henry Townsend of the church missionary society CMS in 1845.The edifice which later served as Vicarage for saint Thomas Anglican church, Badagry was also used by Samuel Ajayi Crowther, the first African C.M.S Bishop when he undertook the translation of the Holy Bible from English to Yoruba, ''

''Originally built of coconut fibers and located on an area of 1,144 square feet, the more than a century and half old monument was recently given a face lift to further preserve it for generations yet unborn.The building is located along the Marina in Badagry.''

Controversy

''It being the actual first two floor building is however disputed, as it is argued that the Hausas in Northern Nigeria had built storey buildings before this building was erected, ''

http://nigerianwiki.com/wiki/First_Storey_Building

When will our colonised compatriots realise the insult handed to them by the British in this baseless claim??

JUST FOR THE RECORD:

The first storey building in Nigeria would have looked like THIS:

Zaria

Or like THIS:

Kano

Or like THIS:

Zaria

Or Like THIS:

Kano

Buildings like these have adorned the Nigerian sahelian landscape for at least 1,200 years, which comes up to roughly 900 years before there was a nation known as Britain.

Now, instead of ''renovating'' the British ''first storey building'', and making highly provocative claims about some white man being the ''first teacher in Nigeria'', why don't they simply SCRAP the whole silly idea of identifying the ''first whatever'' in a land as ancient as Nigeria, and quit these egregious insults to our collective??

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35 answers

Narrative of Travels and Discoveries in Northern and Central Africa: In the Years 1822, 1823 And 1824

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There was no Nigeria in 1845. So it is wrong to label it the first storey building in Nigeria.

....and to those making reference to Nigeria as an ancient land, no it is not.

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A STOREY BUILDING INDEED!

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Without that slave trade, God knows how much this continent would have advanced, honestly.

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The source didn't say but the book is from the traditional archaeology of Nigeria researched in the 1960s. The first building is from what is now Abia State.

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There is actually an 1841 drawing from the British traveler/explorer William Allen of a two story building in the Attah of Igala's place of residence in the city of Idah.

@ Ezeagu, what are the dates on that building?

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You lost on this one tpaih

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Sorry dude but i gotta say this to you "You are crooked, " . So dubious of you to keep turning & twisting the obvious,  All you need to say is Oops! i thought it was minaret, then you wont have to lie and displaying your ignorance around your ignorance  .

So RATTERTY it seems that you are what is know as a "slowpoke" . Gee, who'd 've guessed ? Not me .

Now run along and have a nice hate filled day ,ya' little bigot .

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That Huasa Building is inspiring, this are the kind of buildings that should be mordernised with all mod cons, Oyinbo will respect US all if we embrace our indigenous archietetures. Perharps we should learn from Gadaffi who embrace his desert tent heritage, that archietecture is more rudimentary when compared with what we have in Kano State. Nigerians should proud of this unique archieteture.

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where does one even start from, with you lot.

see another zinger:

i dont even know where to start from with you people, so let me allow you to keep zigzagging all over the place until you're tired.

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you do seem very daft and immature and i dont really want to waste my time with you.

however, go back very carefully, reread my post, and if you still dont get it, blame your primary school teachers for not helping you with your english grammer.

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sjeezy said:

This ''Arab influenced'' stuff is just silly. I guess the houses we live in today are not Nigerian houses, but ''English influenced houses'', and ''American influenced houses''.

Such qualifications of course would be silly since modern Nigerian houses look substantively different from European or US homes, having their own unique cocktail/combination of modern Nigerian, and international aesthetics.

Just like ancient Hausa architecture did in its day.

Fact is, Hausa architecture subscribed to the regional conventions of its day, and like every other people in long term contact with the outside world, they drew aesthetic inspiration from local and surrounding styles and conventions over several centuries.

So, those homes are examples of ancient HAUSA architecture.

They do not look like Arab homes any more than my flat in Ikeja looks like a flat in Peckham, London. The materials used are different. The designs show far more curvature than traditional Arab residences.

So you need to appreciate the architectural tradition of the Hausa on its own merit.

Just as you would expect future 26th century archaeologists excavating our current homes to recognise them as examples of 21st century Nigerian architecture, rather than ''21st century English, American-influenced Nigerian architecture''.

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the house should be better preserved, true.

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oldest mosque in africa- the great mosque of Jenne, Mali:

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/mali/great-mosque-of-djenne.htm

i'm still waiting for PHOTOS and links to actual storey buildings in nigeria before 1854, but of course i know it's easier to rain insults when you cant back up your claims with facts!

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Apparently, not all of Africa was thriving.

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Why do you say that?

@Rossike

Even if that wasn't the first storey building in Nigeria, the person who put that sign up ought to be ashamed of themselves as does the local government responsible for that area. Com'on if you are going to make claim like that and go as far as to promote the house as the first by putting up a sign then at least have the decency to fix the house up and make it presentable to potential visitors.

The link below shows the the oldest (1600) surviving house made of timber frame in America. Look how well presented it is?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fairbanks_house_dedham.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairbanks_House_%28Dedham,_Massachusetts%29

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eko(Lagos island) is historical but I like benin city more.

That being said I think the first building in Nigeria would probably be in the North due to the arab influenced culture.

The Arabs/Muslims were light years ahead of everyone in many ways- No lie

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^^DUMBO, THE BUILDINGS YOU SHOWED WERE BUILT BEFORE 1854 BAH?

cheii!!!for nigerians!!!!

some of you are too daft for words!!!

legendary daftness which has to be seen on nairaland to be believed!!!

abeg- you're waaayyyy out of your element so scram instead of embarassing yourself further!

your primary school teacher did a bad job with you!

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@ROSSIKE

I appreciate your optimism, and I am an optimist too, but lets just say that my optimism is like an hour glass that is fast losing sand to the other side, especially after the Yar'adua fiasco. I use to believe that incrementalism might do the trick for Africa, but it seems that nothing less than major surgery to our way of doing things and psyche can jolt us out of our letargy.

It seems clear to me that Africa's so called good times can be described as peace of the grave. I am not willing to accept that Africa is moving ahead rapidly until I see major structural changes on the mother continent - it is just a lull until all hell breaks lose again. Yesterday, it was Ivory Coast that appeared so stable until the dictator died. Before that Liberia was a haven for visitors from inside and outside Africa - see where they are now. One day would be one day, the dictator of Cameroun will pass on, as well will that of Uganda - the peace of those graves will turn to the cry of mourners. The young Kabila has been in charge of Congo since 2001, how long is he going to stay? Is this the beginning of another 30 or 40 year dictatorship? Zimbabwe's Mugabe, in his wisdom, turned a once bread basket into a wasteland with currency denominated in the billions! What do you think will be the ultimate solution to this? Let our shame-ators and repsenta-thieves continue their wayward ways and see whether some soldier will not step in - if only as an excuse to loot. It happened very recently in Niger .

Don't misunderstand me. Botswana, South Africa and Ghana seem to be at least inching up, but the potential of Africa is so much more. Without serious CHANGE don't be surprised if it all comes crashing a few years hence.

I am nagged by a certain structural deformation in our way of doing things. For example, Botswana has maintained a democratic government since independence, has one of the highest growth rates in per capita income and is the least corrupt (according to TI) in Africa, but in 2006 HIV/AIDS prevalence was 24% and it was estimated that life expectancy at birth had dropped from 65 to 35 years (from Wikipedia). This just doesn't compute for me at all!

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The ''FIRST STOREY BUILDING IN NIGERIA'' looks so dilapidated. Isn't anybody looking after it? It may soon become the "ruins of the first story building in Nigeria"

Looks like everything is disposable in Nigeria.

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this is becoming pedantic.

key word here is Arab architecture?

if you dont get it, too bad.

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tpiah said:

Well, where is YOUR evidence that the white man built the first storey building in Nigeria?

That there's a sign saying so at the entrance of the house is nowhere near enough evidence.

We can draw OUR evidence from the fact that the city of Kano is at least 1,000 years old, with an architectural history spanning millenia.

Oh, and if you actually knew what a minaret was, you wouldn't mention the word here.

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so, what wont Nigerians have absorbed, if the white men told the discovery of river this, river that, to those communities living on the river bank, ever since my first history lesson, av been wondering how the white man would have discover a major river in my land. A river where my old old papas go to for fishing, we all know history is written in the interests of who ever the writer was.

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I have no idea.

Yes Benin is a historical city.

I will punch your ovaries. lol

There is a place called Eko inside lagos. Kai, when was the last time you went home again? Pele o Omo daddy annnadoaaakaa abi na wetin be him name again.

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Oh, I've always thought eko was the yoruba name for Lagos. Wow, you learn new things everyday on NL.

ahhh, na u go be omo anadaaoka lol

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And I thought Benin City was a historical city, I heard it from someone on this forum sometime ago.

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Yes. There are many, depends on what history you are after.

From the top of my head, Lokoja, Ikole, Eko [In lagos], Ilorin and many more.

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Does Nigeria have many historical cities?

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Naijamini, I'm a bit more optimistic regarding our present and future,  Across Africa, believe it or not, and by all  indices and statistics, poverty is actually falling year on year, as are illiteracy, disease, conflicts etc.

Military rule is now anathema. The continent's economy has grown at something like 7.5% annually for the last ten years, the fastest growth rate since independence. The middle class has expanded greatly, with their higher purchasing power leading to unprecedented demand for consumer goods across the continent.

15 years ago not less than 20 conflicts raged across the continent. Today that number is down to the ones and twos, which shows growing continental capacity in conflict resolution, an essential requirement for the stability that leads to development,

So there is a steady climb to progress, make no mistake. It's just not happening as noticeably fast as most would like it to.

I project that Africa in the next 20 years would be a much improved place.

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I agree too.

The question is of what value is that if we can't re-write our own history and discard the absolute bunkum they wrote in their combination of ignorance & wickedness ages ago.

Where do we stand when our current fortunes as a continent mirror what they said we would be - ravaging hunger while residing on perhaps the most resourceful continent on the planet, for example! Tribalistic mumbo-jumbo that amount to baby-like babbling of baboons in the bush!

We can protest all we want, but until we take charge of both our history and our present we continue to reinforce the passed-down delusions of ages ago.

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tpia said:

Storey buildings with staircases?

How the hell do you think they got upstairs in the buildings posted?

By rope?

Your imbecility is stunning.

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I agree with you ROSSIKE.

Africa was thriving while the British were still painting their faces blue.

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post solid evidence of storey buildings with STAIRCASES in nigeria before 1845, instead of engaging in conjecture.

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