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Should Nigeria Be On The Terror Watch-list?

Following the Mutullab effect, the US promptly included Nigeria with Syria, Yemen, Somalia, and Cuba as country to be watched for terrorists. The implications of this new classification is both enormous and depressing for ordinary and innocent Nigerians all over the World. While the official government position in Nigeria has been to issue the USA an ultimatum to withdraw the classification, many patriotic Nigerians agreed that Nigeria indeed needs to be included in the terror watch-list.

What do you think?

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50 answers

To answer the question. Read it and understand.

http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-377061.0.html

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@Pifa

I couldn't have said it better!

No wonder the Andy Youngs and Jessie Jacksons of this World have kept silent over this issue. They could have probably kept quite and allowed us roll into a fully failed state-status had Mutallab not come knocking.

I used to not look at Nigerian rulers in terms of religion, but the bitter truth is that we're in this deplorable mess, because our heads of state since after Independence have always been predominantly muslims. Being muslims, they have openly and secretely allowed Islamic fundamentalist extremists unrestricted access into our country. So, why do we even pretend that we don't have Islamic terrorists in our own country?

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@ sammyzacks  and @annyplenty, well-done lists.

In law – at least in American Jurisprudence – there is a concept called preponderance of circumstantial evidence, especially in civil litigation. It means that the law must not necessarily have a "smoking gun" evidence to convict, or in civil proceedings, assign liability.

The US looked at available intelligence, current events in the country and over the last decade and came to a logical conclusion: the Federal Republic of Nigeria is slipping into a failed and radicalized state and should be put on the terror-watch list.

Nigerians, despite their individual and collective industry have an antipathy to probity and accountability, and a disposition to neglect things until a rot becomes unmanageable. Had Nigeria heeded warnings of extremism within its midst, and taken concrete steps to curb it, the world might have seen the mutallab incidence as an aberration.

Had Nigeria, over decades, not developed its sordid reputation as a country that harbors fraudsters, embezzlers and drug traffickers, and tolerance for intolerant religious sects, the world might have had some empathy for the country's inclusion on the terror-watch list.

In addition to the lists posted by sammyzacks  and annyplenty, who can forget the black eye the same northern brothers gave Nigeria during the 2002 Miss World contest?. Let's face the fact that Nigeria has exhausted its reservoir of global goodwill.

So, to bluespice and those who continue to whine about Nigeria's inclusion on the terror list, it is important to realize that the world is tired of the excesses of Nigeria and its citizens. Even black Americans have become weary of Nigerians and their ways. It's no surprise then that the black civil right movement in the US has not risen to Nigeria's defense. Everyone is weary of Nigeria.

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Lets analyse this. Nigeria shows allegiance to the arabs by going to open a university in place of the u.n summit. Boko haram means what?. The miss world beauty pageant cost some people their lives. Reports have been made about alqueda presence trainin peeps in da north. Pictures of bin laden pasted all over the streets of the north thank to slave Northerner mentality. Fake engineer that couldn't detonate a bomb from nigeria plus live interviews from nigeria showing public opinion about situation. All the imams were obviously in support of the fool. Plus he said there were many more of him planning the same missions. Do you peers still think we should be on the list?. But you guys are looking at the smaller picture america has a grand plan. You'll see. They predicted nigerias break ur before 2015 lets see.

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Nigeria is a threat to any proeducation or progressive state, nation or region even southern Nigeria. Chad republic is just like northern Nigeria so why would they be a threat.

They should stay on the list

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We all know al-Qaida uses media to get supporters hyped but we also know from experience, that we cannot assume that is the case most of the time. We have seen the group step up its rhetoric in the last months of 2009 and we also saw lots more attacks and bloodshed as well. Obama attacked Al-Qaida in Yemen, I believe back in November, and retaliation was promised. So, I am not certain that taking this as yet another attempt to get media attention will be wise for affected nations.

I have not said that THE reason why Nigeria is on the list is because Yar adua is missing and the Boy is a Nigerian. No, I have simply suggested that could have been considered, among other reasons, during the decision making process.  I, however, do not understand why you have taken it on yourself to continue asking this question when

a) You admit you do not KNOW THE WHY of the selection

b) NO one has said it is the ONLY reason for the selection

c) The US has YET to release any reason to the public for the particular selection.

What is the point of your asking this question over and over then? Am I missing something else here on this?

If there is anything else you would need for me to research on this, please do tell.

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ma'am i believe there are a couple of things you need to know about alqaeda and the reception they are getting from more and more middle easterners.

It's an organisation that relies a lot on threats and media coverage. More and more middle easterners are tired of the ceaseless loss of lives and are calling the dogma of alqaeda into question, hence their heavy reliance on IEDs in warfare. Anyone that succeeds in creating worldwide attention and invokes their name especially when it comes to america, they will more than likely claim responsibility. That is not saying mutalla was not trained by alqaeda supporters.

Again i ask, how does Nigeria's missing president translate to a terrorist threat?

how does the absence of a sitting president AND the failed bombing of ONE national who just so happens to hail and make a pit stop for A DAY in Nigeria translate to a tier 2 terrorist threat?

Do you even know what this means? Nigerians will be placed under the same level of scrutiny as countries deemed as terrorist breeding grounds yemen and co, AS WELL AS countries that support terorism Syria, Iran and co. If you have no idea how much this scrutiny entails, i suggest a lil research.

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I disagree!! A thinking man would probably put 2 and 2 together to figure it is likely NOT JUST about this one citizen considering Nigeria also happens to be missing a president( a VERY IMPORTANT LEADER in today’s society) at this very time. It is sort of hard to disregard the one when trying to figure out what really prompted the US to do this at this time.

We can discuss the issues of our security crisis when we have solid data to go by, so if you do not mind, I would like to focus on the first please.

There was, only a couple of weeks ago, an announcement from one senator that the CIA had been informed that a Nigerian (this is long before this boy’s father and all that we know of today) was being trained by Al-Qaida out somewhere in Yemen. Now, upon considering what we know of the attempt on Christmas day, isn’t it possible that the authorities are convinced that this boy is just a decoy, and that the real Nigerian terrorist is still out there, and might strike soon? I ask this because I just find it really hard to believe that Al-Qaida actually trained this boy, expecting him to succeed in blowing up that plane.  And the speed and language from Al-Qaida after the revelation just seemed too unserious for me to believe this boy was actually expected to cause havoc on the day of the attempt.

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We are able to know the security crisis in nigeria is internal because you don't see it anywhere that the result of one of the localised riots, inter or intra tribal wars in nigeria has in any way threatened the security of our border countries.

In all the riots the other poster listed, when were chad, benin republic, or cameroon considered in danger?

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I definitely do not think it is the case that we are missing the point here. You do admit that you cannot, in anyway, confirm that the ONLY reason or MAIN reason for this election is because of the action of this one citizen, so why continue to assume it is the case? And how do we confirm that the crisis is definitely an internal issue?

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Thank you for your common sense.

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y'all seem to be missing the point,

Nigeria has her scores on internal problems,

she isnt considered a threat to the safety of chad republic,

how then is nigeria a safety threat to the US?

the action of one citizen is not a reflection of the remaining 150 million citizens.

Granted nigeria needs to wake up n do something about the safety crisis we have all accepted as the norm but the said crisis still is a very much internal issue

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@Annaplenty

You made very good points.

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here is a few from the row call

1.  Dele Giwa was killed with a letter bomb in 1985.

2.  Umar Farouk attempted to blow up a plane with a bomb in december.

3. In the same month of december another man attempted to blow up Superscreen with parcel bomb.

3.  three teenagers hijacked a plane because of june 12 election.

4.  militants kidnapp white men for money in niger delta

5. boko haram islamic sects in 3 northern states

6. kalakato religious fracas in the same month of december

7 maitatsine sect war in lagos

8. jos religious riots.

9. the religious riot by muslims in nigeria because miss world pageant to be held in calabar which was later taken to another venue.

10. the stoning to death and burning of a  young lady christian corper by fanatic moslem students in katsina for malhandling the Quran.

11. Insensitivity by our government to all these and many more.

Classifying us might just be a wake up call to out kitchen leaders to begin to do things right. Americans cannot be blamed for protecting dear citizens if we cannot protect our own.

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We don't have a good record for me to proudly say no and it's so pitiful.

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Ha ha ha     Ahem           NOW snap to attention and stop grinning like idiots !    Herr Uberpussyfinder !  Send for the hot Nigerian university girls and hot eba demanded by the Fuerher before he makes us all face the firing squad.

EBA NOW, you dumkopfs !   Schnell !!

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A country's ambassador to another country has to duely credentialled by the host country. The ambassador has many other people working for him---deputy, vice, assistant ambassadors, so when he said that we have no ambassador in the US, he's 100% correct. No other employee of the embassy was meant to present their credential to the secretary of state like the ambassador.

Anyway, the points are clear, we have neither a president(we can see), nor an ambassador in the US at this critical diplomatic moment.

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who do you think is an ambassador of a country? and what is his/her job?

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Diplomatically, ambassadors and deputy/assistant/vice ambassadors don't carry the same weight. Also presidents tend to want to talk to other presidents, so Obama may not talk to Jonathan about this terror problem. Instead Obama talked with the Yemenese president, but where is our own?-----sorry another topic.

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there might not be an official ambassador, but the next in command will be acting so that negates his argument. There is an officiall representative of Nigerian interests in the US

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at the moment your country dose not have an ambassador to the us, the last was rejected, because his son allegedly Molested some girls in maryland us. the one before was recalled after his racial tirade and abuse, of his slow foreign minister, and the one before that has been indicted for selling embassy property. there you have it, the state of ur country.

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The government might not like to admit it but Islamic militancy is a problem in Nigeria.

But while Abdulmutallab may be an exception, he is not the first extremist to trouble the authorities.

Boko Haram’s leader, Mohammed Yusuf, was accused of having links to al Qaeda, but we will never be able to verify those claims because he was murdered shortly after being taken into custody.

Another radical Islamist sect, Kala Kato, clashed with a rival group and Nigerian security forces in the northern city of Bauchi. Northern Nigeria borders the unstable Sahel region, where al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) is known to operate.

A poll conducted by the Pew Global Attitudes Project in 2009 found that 43 percent of Muslims in Nigeria thought suicide bombing was justifiable.

Nigerians might be right when they dismiss the Abdulmutallab case as a one-off, but they would do well to guard against complacency.

Tanko complained on official Kano state radio in mid-September 2005, “The Shi’a are fast gaining ground in Kano, like wild fire… in every nook and corner of this state, and if we don’t act fast and decisively we will be faced with a disaster worse than Maitatsine.”

Since the former governor of Zamfara State, Alhaji Ahmed Sani, introduced a draconian version of sharia in 1999, 11 of Nigeria's 36 states have followed suit. Five women were sentenced to death by stoning for adultery, though no punishment has yet been carried out. Thieves have had their hands amputated by court order. One man had his eye removed after accidentally blinding a friend (he could have escaped this by paying 60 camels, but the injured party wasn't interested in the camels).

Non-Muslims, usually Christians, have become second-class citizens in Sharia states like Zamfara. Their taxes pay for Islamic preachers, while hundreds of churches have been closed by government order. Gov Sani announced that all "unauthorized" places of worship in Zamfara State would be demolished. Those who exercise their right under the Nigerian constitution to change their religion from Islam are threatened with death, a punishment for apostasy under sharia law.

In 2004, in Yobe State, there was an uprising by a group calling itself the "Taliban," led by a "Mullah Omar," and demanding an Islamic state. It took several hundred troops two weeks to put it down.

In November 2001, Nigerian police arrested six Pakistani preachers, accusing them of inciting religious violence in Ogun state.

The usually reliable news service Compass Direct reports that one of "Taliban" raiders, Muslim cleric Alhaji Sharu, confessed to police that he was a middleman between Nigerian extremists and the Al-Muntada Al-Islami Trust, a Saudi funded "charity" headquartered in Britain. Sharu said that the Trust's money had been used to propagate a Wahabist version of Islam in Nigeria and fund religious violence.

We can go on and on through history to dig out this facts that the Nigerian Gov has not been able to tackle.

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Until when someone can tell me as he so wonderfully put it 'that the Nigerian state sponsored mutallab', PUTTING NIGERIA ON THE LIST IS NOT JUSTIFIABLE.

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Here's a counter view, very well expressed: http://www.nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html

US is right on Nigeria

By Ikenna Emewu [ikenna@sunnewsonline.com]

Saturday, January 9, 2010

I understand the outrage by Nigerians over the decision of US to include us in the terror list. It has become so bad that we are listed alongside the deadly Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and even Iraq. Yes, that serves us right. We had it coming, and we watched folding our hands to wait for it. Today, it is here at last, and the same people who did nothing to curtail it are the same ones squealing.

I don’t make sense in this cry over whether Nigeria is a terror nation or not. The simple and practical truth is that one of us, a terrorist, a suicide bomber, a potential murderer in incubation by his association is a terror merchant. He was caught and never made any denials because he was caught in the act. We may complain and cry or rail at US, but these wont change the reality that Umar Farouk AbdulMutallab is a terrorist. His father saw the signs before he bared his fangs and ran for cover. But for his timely move to report to the US CIA and others on time, today, he would have been quickly branded by US and Britain as Al-Qaeda financier given his heavy cash chest. He escaped it, and I am happy for the old Mutallab.

Terrorism is high crime. It is no child’s play and whoever is caught in the act pays highly. The after effect is that even the clean and good citizens of the nation are all tagged bad alongside their heady brother who had the guts to blow out 300 lives in a flash.

Let us sincerely put ourselves in the shoes of the US and ask if we would not have taken drastic action to safeguard ourselves from threats such as terrorism. The nation has taken its position on Nigeria. That may be so harsh anywhere, but it is unfortunate that we could do a little about it.

It does not make sense to me that our Senate is blowing hot on this, because I am sure when the chips are down, they would understand that their ‘we will fight it out with US’ approach would compound our case.

We are not all terrorists, no doubt, and no nation is. But do the victims care about our sentiments? All they know is to apply their measures and get redress and safety.

Before Farouk took to the skies with death in his hands that would have sent 300 souls yonder and the damage to the airline operators and the shock to the world security, he imbibed the art from somewhere. I am sure that some two years ago, it made news that US warned Nigeria that people with strong Al-Qaeda links are in Nigeria, and also alerted of their possible attack. I don’t know how the matter was treated or reacted to, but I know that Nigeria is a nation so familiar with internal terrorist attacks of its peculiar nature that occurs every now and then. Mark you being terrorist does not mean being a plane or suicide bomber. It means being a terror to other people’s existence and peace.

We have always been that to ourselves in Nigeria. So are we not terrorists, maybe not to US but to Nigeria. Sometime between the end of August and early September last year, the Boko Haram took the stage in Maiduguri and Bauchi. Last week kalo kato struck in Bauchi and many killed.

When the Boko Haram leader was arrested and later assassinated by the police, we cried it was wrong and that he should have been spared to get more information from him. But all were gross nonsense. Boko Haram and the conspirators just got a slap on their wrist and continued. The second nature and name of Nigeria is a boiling cauldron where lives have no value. People are killed in their hundreds at least twice every year in the north, and I say it boldly, including the killings of last year that nobody was ever prosecuted to serve as deterrent. The northern governors at the last massacre by Boko Haram came out to delude themselves of a plan to create laws (as if they never existed) to punish offenders. Since August last year they made the promise, what else have we heard from them?

That culture we sowed the seed in Nigeria over time has matured and grown tall to reach the skies where it blazes with the fire to spill blood in hundreds of litters. Although he might have been trained outside Nigeria, Farouk just climaxed that attitude that has been in us – of killing and killing again without any guilt of punishment. As we condone the known killers, we empower the trainee killers to sharpen their teeth into axes and kill more and boast about it because nobody will ever punish them.

What is happening to us now may be the accumulation of the rewards of a nation that saw no evil in a woman teacher being snatched out of the classroom by her pupils and butchered in the presence of her crying baby in Gombe State. It is not done anywhere else. We can’t hide this forever, and the busy bodies are crying and shouting themselves hoarse to convince the world that we are not terrorists. We are not terrorists to the level Mutallab has taken us, but we had been that since the 1950s among those we call our brothers in the country.

While the massacre goes on within Nigeria, the whole world hears and takes note. So when one of us goes international with killing, they take more than a passing interest in him. That is the basic truth we should admit. US believes very strongly that those killers in Nigeria who slaughter their brothers with impunity are potential international suicide bombers and with Farouk already unleashed, they simply conclude that more will still come from here to seize the skies.

Unfortunately, while Nigeria holds dear to terrorism among the citizens and doesn’t punish terrorists, the outer world criminalizes it. They caught one and want to show him some example of the weight of his act. Painfully, all of us, including those that cannot spell Al-Qaeda or suicide or bomb are victims. It is pitiably our lot, and too bad.

It has touched on our international image that is why they are jumping around to make claims on why US is wrong or right. While I know what it means for a country to have a bad image before the world and the value of good name, I also don’t place less value on the lives of the citizens of this nation. The least Nigeria does is to step up action and defend her citizens at home or abroad from danger to their lives. That is why Charles Taylor killed Nigerians in thousands only for Obasanjo to bring him here and take care of his family with our resources.

When issues like this arise between Mutallab and the world, the countries involved thrash it out at the diplomatic level. But we have no ambassador in the US, and our president is not available, so who would have blocked the loophole as to save us the embarrassment.

If a society or an individual forms the habit of taking things for granted it affects him in more ways than he could imagine. The health of our president and the need for his deputy to act until he comes back has been an issue for endless lies and baseless politics. We have unwittingly built a nation of lies managed by people who feel information management means telling blatant lies. As we practice it here, so we do at the outside world.

I am of the firm assertion that the people in power should blame themselves for not playing the right diplomatic game or pushing the right button to throw open the doors of the US before they labeled us terrorist nation. They have not even established that the state of Nigeria sponsored Farouk before they moved against all of us. But when I have a problem, I should first assess myself to know how I contributed to it. Can we actually say we managed the situation well since December 25 the name of the nation became the song or more appropriately a dirge on international media?

We needed to move in experts to commence the lobby, but the people that have access to power are cut-and-nail party members who don’t know more than their ingenuity in funding and sponsoring thuggery in political parties and are compensated with appointments.

The case of the drastic action and red letter US placed on Nigeria is a sign of the pains they feel about one of us who hit them at the heart. Whenever a man is defending himself, he might take very bizarre steps, but they are all justifiable to him so long as he gets the safety he wants.

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Gigantic undersea oil reserves have just recently been discovered in vast swathes of international waters stretching between South America and Africa, so the potency of the petroleum card as a tool of modern diplomacy could well be on the wane already.  The Nigerian government may have discovered as much when it hastily retracted a laughable "ultimatum to behave" earlier bleated at the US government in protest over the blacklisting of Nigerian air travellers triggered by the failed Xmas day terror attack which had been perpetrated by a Nigerian-born 72-Virgin seeker from the country's looting class.

Vigorous prosecution of those who foment religious strife in Nigeria would be a good start on the path to redeeming what is left of her international standing, but good starts are as rare and unlikely in Nigeria as honest policemen.

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My sentiments exactly! the actions of one single national does not justify tagging 150 million and counting people as terrorists. It's completely atrocious and speaks of the sensitivity and actual wisdom of the obama administration.

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Abuja chapter of NBA reacts: http://www.nigeriamasterweb.com/paperfrmes.html

Nigeria Does Not Deserve Blacklisting – NBA

Written by By Igho Iyoyo , Abuja

Saturday, 09 January 2010 00:46

The Nigerian Bar Association (NBA), Abuja chapter, has described the blacklisting of Nigeria by the United States of America as unfortunate and uncalled for, since a single act perpetrated by an individual should not amount to blacklisting an entire nation.

Abdul Ibrahim, Chairman, NBA, Abuja chapter, who spoke to LEADERSHIP Weekend said that America took a decision that should be reversed because Nigeria does not deserve to be blacklisted since it has been a country that has always supported United Nations in the fight against terrorism.

He said it became also disheartening that instead of America to blame themselves for the recent development, despite the fact that the father of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab informed the United States embassy and the appropriate authority about the suspicious movement of his son, the authorities in charge did not take the report seriously.

"So if they are going to blacklist Nigeria on the outcome of that incidence despite the information from the father, it is most unfortunate. Left to me, Nigeria should on its part, also blacklist America, because some Americans have also come to this country to misbehave and we have not blacklisted them. So one single incident is not enough to blacklist a nation of about 150,000,000 people.

"The seven days ultimatum given to America to withdraw the name of Nigeria from that list by the Senate is okay, but I wonder if they have the jurisdiction to that effect. All we need to do is to react positively, and also blacklist and subject Americans who are coming into Nigeria to what they intend to subject Nigerians to in their country," he said.

Ibrahim explained that crime is not peculiar to any tribe or nation, that any human being whereever he is in the world can be a criminal and that there are also criminals in America. He thereby stressed that Nigerians should also subject Americans to the kind of rigorous security scrutiny just the way Americans are subjecting Nigerians in America.

"One thing Nigerians should know is that America depends more on our oil. In Nigeria, we believe in Westernisation and that is part of the problems we are having in this country. Maybe, this is even good so that it will discourage a lot of people, because any Nigerian that makes little money will want to go to America without planning to invest here in Nigeria.

"But on my own part, I will advocate that we subject the Americans to serious security check when they are coming into the country too, because what is good for the goose is good for the gander. Crime is not synonymous with any particular nation or tribe, it is everywhere.

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oh dear no!

that's my inference, there is yet to be an official reason at least to my knowledge

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Wait a second , Was this the reason we were given for why Nigerians are to be thoroughly screened?

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You guys,

Let me state it that i honestly don't see anything wrong in using the full powers of the law against countries or people with terrorist inclinations or supporters of terrorism, I would have understood if Nigeria was placed on the list at any other time when the safety of ANY country was threatened by the activities of Nigerians, but placing Nigeria on the list solely because the terrorist hails from Nigeria and had a pit stop in Nigeria before he continued onwards to the US is what i have problems with. Being Nigerian just got ten times worse.

I'll accept any day that there are people of terrorist inclinations in Nigeria, which country doesn't have them? but if the US was being just, England too should be on that list because of the [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Reid_(shoe_bomber)]shoe bomber[/url].

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I am already on page 20 on my google search trying to find something remotely close to what I know of. As soon as I find it, I will post it.

To be honest,  I don't really have an opinion on this issue. I mean I was not shocked by the decision. I feel we had it coming, and the only way we can deal with it is do what we should have done from the beginning about our many issues.

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do avail me of where to find such information when you do find it

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This is not the only infamous list we have been on. I can't seem to find it but we were sort of lumped in with some of the same countries, only I cannot seem to remember what the list was about, but definitely had something to do with religious extremism/violence or something along those lines.

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I don't know what list you have been looking at ma'am but Nigeria was recently put on the list

http://www.newsdaily.com/stories/tre6044eg-us-security-airline-nigeria/

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Nigeria has been on a watch list for longer than that. I cannot right now remember the list but we have been on a terror watch list or some other infamous list of that sort for some years now. In addition, the many religious riots, and our governments lazy approach to tackling violence in the country has helped contribute to all this in some way. Now top that off with the current situation where we find ourselves today. Our own government walks out, without so much as a word on when it will be back and the country on auto-pilot since November of last year, and then the lonely boy turned bomber issue. I think it is not just about this bomber, but everything. Then there is the direct influence islam has on government in most of the north.

I would also consider the millions in funding we have gotten from the US to help fight terrorism from our end --- money that mostly seems to have ended up in private pockets, with nothing to show for it all on the most part. It is not just about the bomber and the events of the last 2 months, this is more than that.

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Terrorism being referred to here is "Islamic extremism". And the lack of proper handling of our religious crisis by the Nigerian Gov in the country over the years, simply points to the fact that Nigeria is already on the LIST of countries to WATCHout for as far as EXTREMISM is concerned.

Let's not wait for others to tell us the truth. We should tell it to ourselves.

Precaution is always better than cure!

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@Bluespice, could it simply be that you make the assumption that the blacklisting starts, and ends with the events of last month? I don’t believe to be the case here.

Our apathetic approach to dealing with our many internal terror issues, coupled with the absence of our government for 45 days and counting, is probably seen as a cause for concern, especially for the United States and its fight against terrorism.

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^^^^

Didn't you also see a report that said the guy got his explosives from naija?

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Do you guys watch the news or follow the story at all?

he confessed himself he was recruited while in London, So unless london is now the name of a city, street, local government. . .you get my point in Nigeria, I absolutely do not see the reason or the justification for placing Nigeria on the list, and this is not because i happen to be a nigerian.

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. . . . . and if others with this kind of financial means pop-out, then . . . . . . . . . mMm. . . I hope they better not pop-out.

Thats why the US took it upon themselves to take this precautionary measure.

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Until Christmas day 2009, Nigeria's internal religious conflicts never seemed to affect an outside country, but the idea has always been foreign influenced and foreign based. We can go back in history to as far as the overthrow of legitimate Hausa states by Fulanis proclaiming "purer form of Islam", to Maitastine riots, to the Danish cartoonist, to the English Sudanese teacher who blasphemed Mohammed, to spontenous demonstrations in support of Osama bin Laden in some northern cities, to Boko haram. The idea of religious intolerance and hatred for westerners run dangerously deep and has been brewing in Nigeria for a long time before Christmas day. Mutullab, they say was just one of those with the financial means to carry it out.

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How about the Netherlands? Are they on that list? Is this not racism? Discrimination?

Nigeria, I wish you well.

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Instinctively, the temptation is to scoff at the very notion of Nigeria being branded a hotbed of terrorist activity.  There have been no suicide bombs there, and in speaking to Nigerian Muslims, there is never any mention of the 72 virgins promised in paradise to those who commit murder of non-Muslims, BUT, who could ever forget the troubled country's long history of tribal and religious riots, that erupt spontaneously over trivial matters, to spread like wildfire and claim scores of lives in a matter of hours ?

If the opinions expressed anonymously by Nigerians contributing to internet forums such as this one are anything to go by, the mutual loathing between Muslims and Christians runs bone deep, and is primed to erupt from beneath a thin veneer of civility with a virulence that can be startling.   With that pressure-cooker of compressed hatred straining to find expression in a land where political power devolves from tribal and therefore religious allegiances, those regular outbreaks of sectarian mayhem can only be expected.

From the standpoint of being regarded as a pariah nation of fraudsters, drug runners and now of religious zealots, the final nail in Nigeria's coffin was pounded home on Xmas day 2009 in the air over Detroit, Michigan, where a clinically insane monkey-boy of Nigerian ancestry, who had been comprehensively brainwashed by that ever insidious and homicidal Middle Eastern variant of Islam, attempted to murder nearly 300 innocent air-travellers with an explosive device strapped to the very worm with which he evidently hoped to service those virgins awaiting Islamic murderers in heaven's paradise gardens.

Bearing the foregoing sadly in mind, the recent classification of Nigeria as a terrorist state is not in the least surprising, and is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future,  despite the protests of great men like Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka.

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Nigeria's islamic unrest never affected any other country. There's a reason they are called internal religious conflicts

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Some people like Tam David-West had argued that Nigeria needs to be on that list, because of long history of Islamic religious intolerance.

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absolutely not!

the whole action reeks of the US shelving blame.

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