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Was Colonialism Good For Africa?

Colonialism has always had a bad reputation,with dissidents complaining that it disrupted the peaceful existence of the African society. Others have gone so far to claim that the troubles of Africa is directly related to Colonialism. Chinua Achebe, Mongo Beti and a host of other authors have written blatantly against colonialism. The only exception was Camara Laye, whose favorable setting of Africa was savagely attacked by Mongo Beti. He queried if Laye was not aware of the negative consequences of Colonialism in his native Guinea.  Even Chinua Achebe's novel, Things Fall Apart, I think was written to counter the racist claims of Conrads novel, Heart of Darkness

But seriously, I may be in the minority who would wholeheartedly agree that Colonialism was more of a blessing to Africans than a curse. Some of us know the story of the slave trade in Nigeria, and while the white man has been blamed for introducing human cargo in the continent, don't forget that it was more or less (in some cases) a trade by barter. They supplied the white men with our people in exchange for a bottle of gin. Then, read Things Fall Apart again. The savage killing of Ikemefuna in compliance of the orders of the oracle, Okonkwo drinking palm wine from the head of a human being and his act of spousal beating, rather reinforces, instead of countering the negative perceptions of Africa. The greatest blessing ever is the introduction of Christianity into the African continent. And I know that it is a blessing, because the idols that our forefathers worshipped were non living things. We now worship a Living God and our future in the afterlife is guaranteed to be in His Presence, due to the Love of Jesus Christ.

But the pre-colonial period had its bright side. The breakdown of the family unit was an anathema, peace reigned in the society and people were just content to live a simple, happy life. But when the laws of the society mandated the reqirements needed for a revered title in the land(just like your shareholders would exert pressure on you to act, before becoming the CEO of an organization), some natives of the village resorted to practising some inhuman practises. Today, our family unit is not as stable as it was once before. Avarice has overtaken our simple natures. Now, kickbacks, fraud and dishonesty are reverred institutions in our society.

Still, colonialism had merits in our society, even though the likes of Nkrumah who associated colonialism with evil, along with his compatriots, still visible in the present day generation would probably rebuke me for my stance.

What is your opinion?

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wow, i was only 16 when this post started and its still going, hmmm, interesting

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he "dictator" still benefits from the support of Libyans because his economics achievement in favor of the people, His achievement in Africa Let us consider the example of global telecommunications, TV and satellite broadcasting, to illustrate above statement.

In 1992, 45 African countries incorporated Rascom, a company setup to supervise the construction and launching of a satellite, to control costs of telecommunication and TV broadcasting between the sponsoring nations.

Indeed, telecommunication's costs from one African country to another one was then one of the most expensive in the world because telecommunication's signals from one particular African country were first sent to the North (European countries,) and then diverted to the targeted African country.

The service for the transfer Africa-Europe-Africa was billed by European service providers at costs far more expensive that the one existing for interconnections between European countries. Europe was garnering about US$500million a year for that service, through its network of satellite system.

Rascom project was to put an end to the drain of scarce and vital financial resources from Africa, and use said resources for developing in African countries.

The cost of the project was estimated at US$400million. Just US$400millions paid once and for all. No more US$500millions annual financial drain from Africa to Europe.

The International Monetary Funds -IMF, had been solicited to finance the project. The usefulness of which was evident. Guess what? From 1992 up to year 2006, the IMF dragged its feet, finding all kinds of excuses to delay the financing. Make a quick calculation, in the meantime US$500millions a year, that is US$7billions had been extracted from African countries coffers for the benefit of European nations!

That is when Gaddafi steps in, disbursing a hefty US$300millions, African Development Bank providing US$50millions, and the West African Development Bank US$27millions. Finally, the first African satellite system was live on December 27, 2007.

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That is so Milton Friedman, and of course not true.

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Of course, European rule was good for Africa. If Europeans never came to Africa and Africa had been left undisturbed Africans would still be living in mud huts, and they wouldn’t know that. Africa was the first continent to be circumnavigated and the first to be shown in full on maps, yet its interior was in the Stone Age and did not see the wheel until the 1870s.

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ekt_bear, people didn't just automatically develop shared culture, values and heritage. it typically grows over very long periods of time. those successful countries you mention had their issues in the past too.

because how do cultures develop in the first place?

so shared culture alone won't create unity. you also have to make sure one group of people isn't being treated unfairly/ or being geographically segregated (ex.within yorubaland) etc otherwise, they will develop their own culture over time and we will be back again at square 1 etc

ie the reason it's hard for African americans to assimilate into US even though they have lived together for over 200 yrs!! it's because of marginalization and segregation. the political/institutional structures there kept integration from happening.

yes of course it won't happen in our lifetime. I think it is probably selfish to want it to happen in our lifetime. It reminds me of politicians and how their actions sometimes are not really for long term benefits  but rather some short term projects so that they can be re-elected/remembered. whereas these actions might actually be detrimental in the long term. I think it's better to think for the future rather than present. if our leaders during the slave trade days were thinking about the future rather than present material benefits they will gain, they would have reconsidered and not be compliant with slave trade because it brought terrible long term damages and also allowed colonization to happen. etc that's my opinion anyway. it may not be accurate.

for me, the more I read and learn about other nations/ their beginnings esp. in europe etc the more hope I have for Nigeria.

I really don't expect too many young people to have tribalistic sentiments as the older generation (I think you are an exception lol). A nigerian culture is developing. and over time, I think it will become stronger and people will see the whole "yoruba" "hausa" thing as more of a heritage rather than culture. If you are in lagos for example, most yoruba and igbo youths share similar cultures. their ethnic group has become more of a heritage only.

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Shipping by water is probably just a fraction of the cost shipping by road or air. . . if it turns out that shipping by sea costs 1/5th of the distance of shipping by road, then you can ship 5X the distance at the same price.

This is a physics/business/transportation thing. . . nothing really special about China specifically. The guy I quoted probably used China as an example because they export so much stuff (and is pretty far away from Nigeria).

Anyway, the major point I (and the guy I quoted) is making is that Nigerian infrastructure right now is very bad. . . 450 miles by road from Lagos to Abuja should not be more expensive than 7K or 8k+ miles from Lagos to China. Long story short. . . we need better infrastructure.

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China-NYC is more than 2800 miles (more than 7000 miles. I think). But it's cheaper from China. This is just an observation and an acknowledgement of the capabilities of the the Chinese.

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Anyway, I feel more confident about a hypothetical Yorubaland (with probably 50 or 60 million+ people in it) being able to protect its interests better than Nigeria can. It isn't like the constituent countries would be banana republics.

Anyway, this imo is a ridiciulous point; Yoruba for the most part view themselves as one today. . . time, intermarriage, and having other rivals/enemies in the country have united us. No reason to believe this would fall apart (other than fearmongering.)

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^-- Can you give some concrete #s for shipping?

BTW, not an apples and oranges comparison. . . Long beach to NYC is 2800+ miles, while Lagos to Abuja is 450 miles or so. 450 miles in the US I'm sure you can do at a fraction of the cost of getting from China.

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Ditto for the US, Ekubear. It costs more to transport a container from Long Beach, California to New York than from China to New York.

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I just wish the govt could do something/ come up with measures to integrate the country better. You seem to know more about the system than I do and I have to agree with you that it partially has to do with location of cities like you pointed out. cities are generally the central points or "melting pots"

ex. people living in southern Nigeria are so disconnected from the north( and vice versa) in so many ways. I was embarrassed to meet people from Niger and Chad that ask me about hausa movie stars and I didn't even know there was a booming movie industry up there in my own country. I mean I sort of knew but it was just a wow moment for me how clueless I am about people in my own country. we just aren't connected enough I guess. take nairaland for example. it's mostly representative of  just 50% or southern half of the country.

I know the issue is a lot more complicated but i'm sure there are things to be done to facilitate integration.

This kind of goes back to ajanlekoko's point about turning "colonial legacies" around and making it our own. I guess I agree with him on more points than I had realized.

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well my point was that Nigeria shouldn't adopt this kind of federalism quoted below because we are still very fragile.

there are varying levels of federalism. i.e the north was allowed to go ahead with their sharia laws. but letting each region take full control over their economy,commerce etc will be calling for trouble.

and the US fed govt does take power away from the state "when/as necessary." ie the "necessary and proper" clause in order to protect the country. because unity of the country is the ultimate goal. although US is a federalist country.

I'm definitely not for secession. If Nigeria didn't have oil, I still wouldn't support secession.

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^--

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/jan/14/lagos-railway-change-lives-nigeria

I'm not sure what fraction of transport in the US is done via road versus rail, water, etc.

Road networks in the US are obviously far superior to those in naija, greatly reducing costs. I'd imagine you'd want to transport a container via rail though than by road.

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Strong exaggeration there. It definitely does not cost more to transport a container from Lagos to Abuja.

Isn't a large percentage of the haulage in the United States done by road?

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^-- I strongly disagree.

It costs more to transport a container from Lagos to Abuja than from China to Lagos. If that doesn't reflect on how poor the transportation system in this country is, I dunno what does. As I've said earlier. . . in a certain sense, this means that Lagos is closer to China (and the rest of the world) than it is to Abuja.

Transportation in this country might be good by African standards, but that isn't good enough.

Regarding your latter point. . . Africa (and the rest of the developing world) as a whole is urbanizing. Urbanization is not a bad thing. And it doesn't make much sense to fight it.

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Jenifa

@Jenifa

There are fairly good transportation system existing in Nigeria relative to other African countries. It's not perfect by no stretch of the imagination. The exchange of goods and services already exist without the government. Businesses already are venturing out. I'll wish for the government to decentralise by transferring some large government departments out of Abuja to different parts of the country. That action in itself will force Nigerians from different parts of the country to move about and partake of other cultures and perhaps help expand the economy beyond the city centres and what we have now.

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Right now Nigeria is a fake federalism.

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I don't think federalism and unity are antithetical. there are varying levels of federalism like ajanlekoko already pointed out.

ex. the US is a federalist state and in fact, the central govt was strengthened more in the decades after their civil war of secession between the north and south.

when you give too much power to regions/states and too little to the central govt, the the chance of the country breaking up is very high because each region will want to do its own thing at the expense of the other regions.

Nigeria is already weak as it is so no need to weaken the central govt further unless you are for secession.

you can have federalism with a relatively strong central govt. I definitely don't want Nigeria falling apart so I think the central govt should maintain some control over the economy and foreign investment.

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^^ I've been around bro. Just on other threads. It's not easy to keep preaching those broad fundamental messages. But we have to keep at it for the sake of out people.

well done.

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Pretend that oil revenue were $0. Then why would anyone be opposed to dividing the country? How wouldn't this leave everyone better off?

Anyway, just wanted to point out to you that federalism and unity/integration are antithetical.

The British for the most part designed Nigeria properly. . . 3 largely independent states. A centralist government makes no sense for a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural country like naija. Only reason we do things as we do now is because of oil money.

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Yes Nigeria works as a federation. but the goal should be to work toward more unity/ integration because to me, that's the best and is more foolproof against secession. Nigeria already has a weak center so there's no point in weakening the central government any further.

how do you mean by level of maturity?

I don't think i'm understanding your idea of compulsory, un-paid public service. can you give examples?  

isn't it logical that it will be exponentially more expensive to manage than NYSC?

The US ended forced military draft after the disaster of Vietnam war in the 70s.

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^^

Well, eight of the world's largest countries are governed as federations, with varying degrees of autonomy. The US, Switzerland, Pakistan, Germany, Australia, The United Arab Emirates, are regarded as federations. In fact, even Nigeria is in actuality a federation, with an imposed unitary approach to governance, brought on by the military.

The UAE is a very good example. The various emirates were standalone, up till the late 60s, when Sheikh Zayed of Abu Dhabi invited the other rulers to form a federation. In the UAE, every form of administrative and civil governance is done at the level of each respective emirate, while foreign policy, military capability, are at the centre. Interestingly, there are no elections in the UAE, as leadership is hereditary. But its a stable state nonetheless.

Regarding the issue of volunteer service, I'd still say that some form of compulsory service beyond NYSC is required. NYSC on its own is weak and expensive to manage. After all the draft was introduced in the US at some point during the First World war. Until Nigeria attains some level of maturity, some compulsory form of service to the nation would be helpful.

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those are good points about political stability and having a federation of states.

but I'm not sure about these two points:

Is there an example of a successful system like this?

I feel that the center will be very weak/forced. Might as well break the nation into three different countries.

I think NYSC is enough. Other than that, volunteer service should remain what it is. volunteer.

I don't think citizens (in any country for that matter) will respond favorably to being forced into uncompensated labor.

millitary service and public office can never be compared to jury duty.

jury duty is nothing. The closest equivalent I can think of is environmental sanitation day. except people on jury duty actually get paid some compensation! and jury duty is once in a decade or so as compared to once every month for sanitation day in Nigeria.

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It was good in short term but very bad in long term.

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Thanks.

Let me be clear. I say somethings were inevitable because, most times you can't control what happens to you.

I say Africans have been lazy because of their inability to control their response to the colonial events. I think Covey defines reponsibility as 'ability to control your response'. He went further to say that was what being proactive was all about.

The only thing Nigeria needs is political stability. Judging by our history and immediate past, we can only get there if Nigeria is restructured into semi-autonomous federating units. This is because we only ever got a strong central government under the military, and look where that got us. I don't think Nigeria can afford to have an individual or clique that is vested with almost absolute power. Let the various indigenous peoples determine their rate of development, using structures and systems that are relevant to them. The 19 Northern states went for Sharia, which I think is a good development for them. The people believe in it, so let them have it, and let them take responsibility for the success or failure of the institutions that they set up.

I personally think four years is too short. We should look at between 6-10 years for our elected officials.

We should keep the quota system to ensure equitable distribution of federal appointments. Only institutions like the armed forces, foreign policy, judiciary, and legislature should be supported at the center. Economy, Commerce, Industry, foreign investment, works, science, technology, education, even civil policing, all should be regionalized. These are the areas where mere political rotation of party loyals can't work. We have only ever appointed ministers on the basis of political and ethnic affiliation rather than competence. Small wonder we never see results.

Constitutionally de-emphasize any structure or government form that depends on individuals. A strong president, a strong chairman, we don't want those things. We need strong institutions, to paraphrase Obama.

Finally, stop paying public officers, or making public service some form of titular office. Make military service and public office a required duty, similar to jury duty in some parts of the world. Everybody should participate in some form of governance, which will vary according to your level of education. For example, after high school, compulsory military service. After university, compulsory public service, whether local government, or state, or even federal level. This I think will influence the orientation of Nigerians to a large extent, and give them a sense of belonging.

I'm not really saying anything about so-called technological advancement. That is not really our problem. With the resources we have, both human and natural, what our focus should be is wealth creation. Empower people towards entrepreneurship. Technology can be purchased, just ask the Arabs. What can't be purchased is political stability. Again, ask the Arabs.

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AjanleKoko,

I think there is contradiction in your post. on one hand, you say somethings are just inevitable. on the other hand, you say it's a lack of action (laziness). what makes a situation inevitable and what makes it evitable? What's the criteria for judging an outcome as inevitable or not?

IMO, terrorists in Khyber pass learning to create bombs over internet can only be compared to yahooze nigerian guys scamming people on the internet. nothing all that groundbreaking about that. But it shows how people use resources to create opportunities for themselves even if illegal or against ethical standards.

I think the kind of technological advances lekside is talking about will be limited by the capitalist system. Stuff like state of the art artillery, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing etc (if we can't create our own/ are importing, then we really have no control over it) In this way, we really can't create technological breakthrough easily because there is NO WAY we can compete with outsiders. and there are such things as property and intellectual rights unless you go by illegal means to which there are repercussions. It's like starting a race with your opponent miles ahead of you. how do you win that one?

I agree with your points about the dictators. Yea they deserve to be removed and all that but why is it always the west interfering in the global south's politics all the time? The whole paternalistic behavior of "I know what's best for you and your country."

Even the US govt advices GEJ on economic, political and even social matters.

This hasn't helped us one bit and it will never help us. To me, the key to development is to be removed from the reins of the west and that's going to be the biggest challenge.

what are concrete ideas you think are key to Nigeria's development? How do we become "hardworking" to develop ourselves? and what models are you judging this idea on?

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It is laziness. lekside also said we haven't achieved the 'technological breakthrough', whatever that means. What technological breakthrough are Africans waiting for? Technology is everywhere these days, even terrorists around the Khyber pass are learning how to make bombs on the Internet. Africans always have one absurd excuse like that. I think that's really the problem; maybe we think we are a special case, and should be treated specially by the rest of the world. We're not, and should not. We'd better get off our backside and get going.

We always say there's a conspiracy by Western nations. Of course there is one. The world doesn't run on its own accord, there have always been puppet masters behind the scenes pulling the strings. But Africans have a special situation, and 'lack of vision' just doesn't explain it anymore.

In the case of Saddam, etc, the West didn't ask Saddam to go and gas the Kurds and mass-murder 180,000 of his own people, dumping them in mass graves. Saddam craved power, and went into an unholy alliance with the US, who used him to go after Iran without success. He fell out of favour when he decided to try out some unauthorized expansion idea.

I don't need to even go into the issue of Ghadaffi, who is perpetually trying to get recognition as some sort of Afro-Arab great guy. Now most of his Arab brethren are secretly hoping he gets swatted out by the US and NATO warmongers. For me, most of those men are homicidal maniacs anyway, and have only dreams of ruling their people forever, stupendously enriching themselves in the process.

Africans need to wake up and realise two things. One, you can't get away from the past, some things are just inevitable. Two, they have something to offer the world, and should get busy creating their own legacy. Most Africans are either global refugees, or prisoners in their own continent. It's a sad situation.

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example of ways we are still being colonized --> http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-607357.0.html

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And we are still not ready to protect our motherland, otherwise, we would have shunned China from invading our continent. I was reading a publication the other day and it mentioned that the Chinese have taken over some the agrarian business that they not only hire the indigenes (Zambians), but also maltreat them too.

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I don't know what you mean by laziness being our problem.

I think lack of vision is a better term like lekside said.

a slave could be the most hardworking slave in the world while his master may be the most lazy in the world. but that doesn't change the power structure. it's not that much about laziness than it is about purpose/vision etc.

for me, I know that our governments know exactly what's going on. In fact, I really agree with lekside esp. giving the example of gadaffi, saddam Hussein, Mugabe etc. These are leaders that try to take control and free their country from the west/white rule. but the west always want to hold on to power so they attack back.

I bet if jonathan goes against obama's wishes today, the punishment will be great. so our leaders are in essence sometimes unwilling puppets. but I do agree that they do some of these things out of personal greed as well.

ex. the structural adjustment programs implemented in Nigeria and many african countries in 70s and 80s is an example of how the west (IMF etc) were running our nations through our leaders. but then our leaders can't do anything about this because we owe them money in loans! if we went against their wishes, loan will be defaulted.

so the question of whether the situation we are in right now is inevitable or not is really up for debate.

is there a way that our leaders can try to work toward the progress of Nigeria but at the same time not upset the western powers?

is it a zero sum game where what's good for us is bad for the west and vice versa?

ex. china's rise has contributed to huge financial deficit for US. so what was good for china is kinda bad for the US. and I'm sure if china were a small country or less powerful country, it would have been a war zone a long time ago/ or problem solved with some covert CIA operation.etc

so is it really our leaders that's keeping us down? or the west? or a combination of both. how can our leaders rise up to the challenge successfully? what would you do if you were president?

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An honest insight that couldn't have been put better

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lekside,

Far from it. I think people are lazy. Your comment regarding 'our leaders' even confirms it. The average Nigerian, nay African, appears to be waiting to be told what to do by a 'leader'. We have a leadership crisis in Nigeria primarily because nobody sees themselves as leaders. People sit and dream of a utopia that they expect a leader figure to provide, rather than than them rising vertically where they are.

For example, you hardly see a plumber putting everything into his plumbing profession, till he rises above other plumbers. Instead what you see is a plumber who prefers to maintain status quo, and when things go sour, blame someone else or even blame the plumbing profession. In Africa, you hardly see consistency. What you see is people stubbornly sticking to doing the same thing the same way year in year out, and when things go sour, they blame everything under the sun.

It's part of why I said earlier that colonialism was inevitable for Africa. The West needed resources, they turned to Africa, and deployed the only tool at their disposal - brute force. We were not ready, so we couldn't protect our motherland.

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it is not that we are lazy, but we have not achieved the technological breakthrough required. the blame should be on our leaders who either have no vision, or have no interest in achieving these great task. there are many blue prints eg the 6334 system that was to transformed the countries educational systems in achieving the neccessary technological transformation.

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yes, that is what is happening in the world today. even though, many countries were pronounced to be independent, they continued to be dependent ( indirect colonisation) things only gets the other way round when some band of soldiers/otherwise seize power and cuts relationship with them. such people are then branded the axle of evil. examples are the magabes, abachas, gadhafis, saddams, fidro catrols etc

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well some will moan and whine about it, just like (i think) seun said, we can never know what africa would have turned out like without colonialism. what i do know, however, is that we cant blame colonialism for the state of africa. africa is in the state it is because of the people and the government. we are the ones who can change our fate - as soon as we stop blaming everyone else and develop some pride and ambition, africa can truly prosper.

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didn't the British also rule through our own chiefs and rulers? there was full complicity with the slave trade that preceded it too.

I mean, I get where you're coming from but I think the situation then is similar to the way it is now

if colonization was inevitable, then I believe that the situation we are currently in right now is also inevitable.

even during colonization, the british had to protect their investment (Nigeria) by building roads and infrastructure etc. else, how would they be able to extract wealth if there is no functioning system to facilitate it?

even with slavery, i'm sure the owners make sure to feed their slaves or else how will they have the energy to continue working. lol

the companies are probably not deliberately trying to impoverish Nigeria. yes.  but they do try to enrich themselves at the expense of Nigeria. most of them even probably believe that what they are doing (or what they did in the past) is good for us. or at least that's what they use to justify their actions.

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Definitely not. In my opinion, yes, the foreign powers want oil, etc., but nobody is paying the rent-seeking Nigerian elite to deliberately impoverish their people. Far from it, according to Wikileaks. They all seem scared that the country might eventually descend into anarchy and jeopardize their investment, hence their eagerness to compromise and turn to any willing strongman to stabilize things. The elite, who are full-time rent-seekers who just want to get paid for being in power, cannot just find the balls to seize the economy by its britches and force it into the 21st century. Though some like Fashola are trying though.

In truth, Nigeria appears to have more of a cat and mouse relationship with many foreign powers. The British influence is waning, the Americans are trying to deepen their footprint but find us too complicated and messy, and the Chinese are throwing cash left right and center trying to get a foot in the door.

In recent times, it seems only the Lebanese like the Chagoury family, Indians, and other Arabs, are having an excellent run of the place. The established British and American giants have stayed well away from the privatization bonanza of the last 12 years, preferring to keep their eye firmly on their oil investments. But it's a blessing in disguise. Whenever Nigerians decide to wake up, the economy remains there for our taking. But, unfortunately, people still look to strong men to save them, ostensibly from their own naivete and laziness. Nigeria's case is very different from the rest of Africa.

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Africans lost their natural instincts and intuitions with colonization and oyinbo indoctrinations.The generation of africans that precedes colonization are like people born into total chaos with no harmonious and systematic link with their natural past and constructive precedences.The sorry and unidealistic state of africa today is a testimony to that.

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Libay is gonna find out soon as the West recolonization forces gain momentum aided and abetted by, No fly zone,  aka all-out-attack tactics.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12869658

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I agree with the second part of your post about the Japanese not having any raw materials that the west could exploit. it was truly a blessing in disguise.

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People who keep saying colonialism was a blessing are forgetting the example of Japan, which was able to modernize after exposure to the outside world without being economically exploited, invaded, or mentally and culturally degraded.

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You really believe that?

If they could have then they would have. They had neither the organization, geographical knowledge, disease resistance or medical knowledge to do so.

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the way you guys post, if Britain comes back tomorrow and tries to legally colonize Nigeria, no one will resist.

we seem to have a subservient mentality.

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as with the present world, they are still colonizing undergroundly by sponsporing their preferred candidate. during the colonisation of nigeria, many obas in the western region quickly called on the europeans and signed a treaty with them to have their kingdom as their protectorate to prevent invasion by more powerful obas of the neigbouring kingdoms since the civil war was still going on thru out the yoruba kingdoms. thus the case of calling by some citezens of libya and the above example are all the same

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I kind of agree. Though we only look at Western colonization. The Arabs might well have overrun sub saharan Africa. Speaking of Arabs, they were also colonized, ironically. Ditto most of Asia. Colonization is relative. Modern Britain has a Norman, Saxon, and Roman colonial past.

This one is a tough one. It's difficult to say it was a colonization, since some of the Libyans were begging for it, apparently.

'Liberation' is also a form of colonization, though. You wouldn't expect the Allies to rescue the Libyans without getting something for their trouble, would you? What are they, Jesus?

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the invasion of libya, is that not another colonisation?

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yea there wouldn't be a Nigeria without colonial rule. but I think there would have been a better Africa.

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Hmm.

I think it did present some opportunity, albeit at a high cost, the cost of freedom.

A nation like Nigerian could never have pulled together by common agreement. We look at ourselves as poor achievers, but truth be told, we are a reasonably solid model for development in the African context. We were actually progressing at some point before we had major political setbacks like the military returning to power in 83, and IBB taking over.

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^ colonization is never positive.

but of course your colonizers will always tell you that it's good for you.

no Asian Tiger country will tell you today that colonization was a good experience for them. at least the smart individuals from those countries. Yea some overcome in the end etc but that doesn't mean colonization was justified/positive. it never is.

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