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Who Is Fooling Who?

PART 1

Nigeria: EFCC - Chronology of the Deceit!

According to an English adage, it is not all whom the dogs bark at that are thieves!

The EFCC chairman, Malam Nuhu Ribadu, has publicly declared almost every serving past leader as thieves, except perhaps those in the good books of the greatest pretender of our time - former President Olusegun Obasanjo. He has repeatedly in the past called former President Babangida all sorts of uncharitable names even though the biggest official robbery committed within the shortest space of time took place under the sanctimonious Obasanjo administration. Public robbery under that administration was glorified as financial skill.

In his latest antics, Nuhu Ribadu wants to create the mischievous impression that the Yar'Adua administration is not zealously committed to the anti-corruption crusade as his predecessor - Gen. Obasanjo, even though the former president is scared to declare his assets publicly. His rude confrontation with the Attorney-General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Mr Michael Aondoakaa is testimony to EFCC's mischievous game to discredit President Yar'Adua's philosophy of following the rule of law.

Ribadu and his fellow travellers on Obasanjo's train kangaroo culture are not happy to be directed to operate within the boundaries of the rule of law. For so long, Nuhu Ribadu deceived Nigerians and it is high time someone stood up and exposed his lies and insincerity in fighting corruption. As one produces a chronology of evidence, the chinks in the armour of the EFCC will be revealed and then we shall all see that the real obstacle to the anti-corruption crusade is Ribadu's insincerity and rough justice. Justice is supposed to be blind, but in EFCC's case, it is one-eyed!

Didn't Ribadu tell the Senate in 2006 that thirty-one governors had cases to answer over corruption and even claimed that he had watertight evidence to nail them? Now, why did the number suddenly reduce to mere five governors? Ribadu consistently rejects accusations of lopsided justice, but why didn't he show enthusiasm towards the petitions against certain former governors?

It was recently reported that forty billion naira was donated to the PDP 2007 presidential campaign war chest by corporate bodies in violation of the limits set for donations to political parties by the Electoral Act 2006. Was Nuhu Ribadu in a slumber? Were these donations not made with the full knowledge of former President Obasanjo? Why didn't Ribadu or Emmanuel Ayoola of ICPC show interest in these corruption-laden donations? What has become of Ribadu's celebrated guts?

Nigeria also lost fifty-seven billion naira as revenue as a result of import duty waivers and concessions generously granted by Obasanjo to his blue-eyed boys in Nigeria's private sector. Does Nuhu Ribadu need to be reminded that this is corruption and abuse of office? Were the Vaswani brothers not deported out of Nigeria at the instigation of their business rivals who were friends of Obasanjo? The Vaswani brothers were accused of defrauding Nigeria of forty billion naira as import duty evasion.

What happened to Ribadu's report on the eighty-five billion naira scandal at the Nigerian Ports Authority? Former President Obasanjo publicly discredited the report, describing it as inconclusive because his friend, Bode George, was involved. If Ribadu is driven by principle rather than opportunism, why didn't he resign, at least to prove to Nigerians that Obasanjo was not sincere about the anti-corruption crusade? It is clear from this case that contrary to the impression that Ribadu is making sacrifice for doing this job, the man has private motives for continuing in office despite the hypocrisy of Obasanjo.

Mallam Ribadu is obviously dancing in a net, but how long can he fool discerning Nigerians? In the wake of the third term project in 2006, it was on record that fifty million naira cash was being dished out to any senator willing to play ball by voting for constitutional amendment. Strangely, but not surprisingly, Nuhu Ribadu swept the issue under the carpet.

Obasanjo's cousin and former Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Defence, Mr Joseph Makanjuola, were cited in a 420-million naira corruption scandal and were arrested to impress the public that Obasanjo's government meant business. However, a few months later, the then Attorney-General of the Federation, Mr Kanu Agabi, rushed to the court to discontinue Makanjuola's prosecution, which conveniently created the chance for him to escape abroad. Was Ribadu sleeping when this incident happened under his nose?

Perhaps to prove that he meant business, Mallam Ribadu once arrested Gen. Babangida's son, Muhammad Babangida, harassing the poor boy to explain how he got the money to buy shares in Globacom. But our moral warrior, Ribadu, did not arrest Gbenga Obasanjo to explain how he has been making his money after abandoning his medical practice in the US. to return to Nigeria when his father became the president in 1999.

Besides, Obasanjo's son in the US., Muyiwa, allegedly bought a house at 570 thousand dollars, just one year after leaving the university. And when the press cornered Ribadu, he said Muyiwa is a private citizen, which is outside the purview of EFCC duties. How deceitful! Was Muhammad Babangida a public office-holder when Ribadu went after him?

http://allafrica.com/stories/200711020662.html

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99 answers

@ clem

u will only tell me to smoke poo cos u have tried it b4.

unfor sori i dont mix with the wrong type.

so u fit continue ur habbit.

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@joke

this is a remix.

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@izeek i do.

u dont like it?

smoke poo then.

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@clem

u keep judging other swith ur stale tale,

abeg @ post

nice one there.

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A very good one posted by Otokx

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Are you kidding? Did you seriously post that to make a point? Plus you claim to not want selectivity and then you post that? How can anyone not think you are a joker?

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It's up to Nigerians not to settle for less!

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PART 4

EFCC’s unfinished business

It is also strengthened by the fact that Governor Gbenga Daniel has come forward with the magic of making over N4 billion, not from governing Ogun State but from Kresta Laurel, while his wife made hundreds of millions of Naira. This confirms the contention that the eight years Obasanjo was play-acting about fighting corruption remain an unprecedented boom period for corruption and it is so predominant that nothing practically works in Nigeria today.

To help EFCC outlive the self-created poor image it cultivated among Nigerians, especially in the later part of the Obasanjo pestilence and having realized that it cannot mutilate Nigerians' perception of corruption, Ribadu and co should brace up and deal with the following sore cases that gnaw at the soul of EFCC’s poor image with millions of Nigerians.

Firstly, EFCC must close in on former President Obasanjo and clear the mountain loads of indiscretions that trail him. Questions about his sudden wealth, from bankruptcy in 1998, the presidential library, the MOFAS account, the Bells School, the PTDF looting, Transcorp wonder company, the Otta Farm renaissance, the dubious sale of the country’s patrimony to fronts, hirelings and cronies, the cash in presidential jet scandal, and so many other tell-tale signs of official looting should be investigated.

EFCC would find that it would eternally work to its detriment for it to continue shielding the former president from the law when the entire nation is alive to the obscene display of wealth by the former president. I hope he is not still enjoying immunity, given the way he is deliberately left out of the prospective politicians EFCC wants to rein in. The way it had carried on as if corruption is limited to the acts of the former governors, without referring to the source and headspring of corruption in the last eight years, induces greater questions about the capability of Nuhu Ribadu to cleanse the country of filth perpetrated by politicians.

Secondly, the EFCC must, as a matter of urgency, launch into a comprehensive probe of the present Maurice Iwu-led INEC. Nigerians are aware of the hefty sums of monies voted for electoral projects that were never executed. Being that INEC has been the source of the present tempestuous drift of the nation and given that over N60 billion that was emptied in INEC were mostly monies by western donor agencies, the EFCC would do greater harm to itself if it pretends it never knew the collateral damage the wholesome fraud and corruption perpetrated in INEC just the other day does to its image and that of the country.

If Iwu is chained and brought to court, that will certainly send a great signal that EFCC is up and doing on the task of ensuring that this country is not being deliberately exposed to the blistering effect of fraudsters and scammers that deign no scruples, inflicting deliberate damage on the country and profiting greatly from such asinine business. The cost of leaving out Iwu from trial is that he would continue his present pastime of insulting the whole human race for not accepting that he duped the country of several billions of Naira and forged electoral results as they suited the whims of those that hired him. Do we need to revisit Colin Powel’s nation of scammers comment? Then EFCC must rein in Iwu before he rubbishes what remains of the image of the country.

Thirdly, the EFCC must arrest Bode George and bring him to justice for the scam at the NPA. One realizes that in a bid to explain away his alleged partisan approach to fighting corruption, Ribadu was to engage in a shocking trading of very contradictory and embarrassing riposte to his earlier indictment of George. He rehearsed the tame and tepid excuse being tendered by Bode George over the NPA affair to the effect that he (George) was a part-time chairman of NPA, when the plundering took place, as if there are also full-time chairmen of parastatals.

By now, Ribadu must have acknowledged that such faux pas that smack of dubiousness is not doing his image and that of his EFCC any good and the earlier he brings George to justice, the better for him. Then again, the Emmanuel Andy Uba money laundering charge is a litmus test for EFCC’s fresh commitment to tackle corruption without putting on partisan binoculars. Given that the case happened in the United States and is well known, continued defence of such international crime, as Ribadu tried to do when Uba was being corruptly cleared for his ill-fated gubernatorial dream, will only mean some giant flies in EFCC’s ointment of rediscovery.

The well known scandalous handing over of the nation’s refineries to cronies and fronts of Obasanjo must be fully probed. The manner the refineries were handed over in deals that rock the underbelly of decency and due process is a subject of wide-ranging discontent in the polity. I read where Ribadu was, in the hangover of the subservient role he played for Obasanjo, justifying the corrupt sale of the nation’s refineries, which lends some doubt to his capacity to probe the deals.

But he must know that so long as he exhibits such brazen fling of pandering to Obasanjo’s narrow and selfish interests, he stands to perpetually injure himself and his image among Nigerians. These must be probed, the assets recovered and the offenders punished for Nigerians to believe they have an impartial Daniel on the anti-corruption throne of the country. The underhand sale of Apo Legislative Quarters, buildings around Aso Rock and several public buildings all over the federation to cronies of Obasanjo, are gaping sores that need to be mended for EFCC to regain its damaged image.

Ribadu will soon find out he cannot run away from the question about the funding of the obnoxious third term project. As the revelations spew of how that deadly agenda was prosecuted under Ribadu’s nose, he stands eternally periled if his EFCC does not expose the devilish secrecy of the funding of that dubious plot that nudged Nigeria to the precipice as it happened.

Much has been said of the activities of the governors between 1999 and 2007 but nothing is being said of the presidency, which appropriated over 52 per cent of the monthly allocations with practically nothing to show for these. It is a known fact that the federal ministries were racketeering havens during the eight years of Obasanjo's rule and the World Bank was to confirm this when it said that the Presidency was to blame for over 85 per cent of the nation’s corruption index.

http://intellibriefs.blogspot.com/2007/08/nigeria-efccs-unfinished-business.html

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BIGB1 you are such an . SO you showing this link where the EFCC commission did admit to some abnormalities is what?

It takes a man with balls to step up and admit to his flaws, that is something we are yet to see or hear from your toothless GODFATHER IBB.

Please list names of a leader or organization that has been immune to error or mistakes? DUFOS

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We’re not above mistakes – EFCC

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) says that its operatives had never claimed to have the monopoly of knowledge, admitting that "as human beings, like any other person, we can also make mistakes."

The commission’s Director of Operation, Mr Ibrahim Lamorde, who made this confession on Tuesday in Lagos, while receiving in audience members of the Committee on Defence of Human Rights (CDHR), led by their President, Mr Olasupo Ojo, said the commission welcomes "constructive criticism and suggestions that can make us achieve better result in the war against corruption."

Speaking further, Lamorde reminded his guests that "the war against corruption is a collective Nigerian project and not for the EFCC alone," stressing that until every Nigerian assumes the ownership of the war, the monster would refuse to go.

He, therefore, urged the CDHR members to assist the commission in taking the awareness to the grassroots so that the country would heave a sigh of relief as far as corruption is concerned.

Earlier, the CDHR boss, Mr Ojo, had told the representatives of the commission that the group’s visit was to see things for itself, vis a vis some insinuations that suspects in the EFCC cells were being kept under abnormal conditions. He said that as a civilized country, the condition of cells in Nigeria must conform with the charter of the United Nations that laid down a basic standard accommodation rules for detainees.

Against this background, the CDHR boss suggested that the EFCC should publish pamphlets containing the rights of detained suspects and make them available to the detainees so that they could know what they deserve to have while in the commission’s cells.

While assuring the commission of his group’s readiness to assist in spreading the anti-corruption gospel to the grassroots, he said: "Even before the advent of the EFCC four years ago, human right groups had been in the forefront of anti-corruption war," adding, "right now, all members of the CDHR are automatic anti-corruption fighters."

While conducting the visitors round the detention facilities later, Alhaji Muhammed Alikali, who is in charge of bank transactions at the commission, stated: "Our facilities conform with the said standard of the United Nations charter," while expressing dismay about some bogus claims in the media.

Heassured the media, civil society groups and interested individuals that "the commission is very accessible," adding that EFCC has been doing its work according to the rule of law.

http://www.ngex.com/cgi-bin/frame/frameit2.plx?link="http://www.sunnewsonline.com/"

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BigB1

In your most recent posts you have attempted to ochestrate a personality clash between McKren and Iyke-D, this is absolutely unnecessary. We are not having a referendum on personality here neither are we trying to swear or lobby for political allegiance, we are simply discussing the future of our country and those who most times post arguments based on convictions for what is right for our country should have no appologies if they happen to say similar things most of the time.

And yes Mckren and Iyke-D might belong to the same "school of thought" but they are not more freinds than Iyke/BigB1 or BigB1/Mckren.

And when you say you have the right to support IBB, I agree with you. You have the right to support anybody that pleases you and that is what democracy should be about. Sometimes we do get emotional but if you look at the sorry state of our infrastructures  a fair mind will appreciate why we should not appologise for our sentiments.

These days I have made a resolve to talk less about IBB, he yielding to popular pressure and stepping aside in the run up to 2007 elections is enough for me. Asking him not to speak or partake in politics of Nigeria in any guise will be asking for too much, because love him or hate him he has attained a height in which he can not be neglected in Nigerian politics.

However it will be contemptous for anyone to say he should be celebrated.

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This sensible discussion has just gotten into a terrible accident.

How did you get here and how is the baby?

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DO you recall your father came out with a slogan for graduates to become cab drivers? Was that an intelligent move by a dictator who stole billions that could have been used to change ordinary people’s lives?

STOP talking about integrity and selective justice. How many people did IBB jailed based on their opinion? How many people were mysteriously executed?

Was the press even allowed to criticize his regime without been closed down?

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Iyke-D

It is obvious that you're busy running all over the place with absolutely no material.

You fall into this category:I have realized that many have decided to sabotage all my ideas or recommendations, regardless of the content of the message (whether it's positive or negative), just because of my incompressible support for IBB.

I see this as being barbaric and absolutely not in agreement with or according to democratic doctrine.

If my name was Mckren, I'm sure that you will be smiling and dancing behind me. But it's all good.

There is something for sure, we can not all sleep like bunch of drunkards facing the same direction, someone must step up.

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Iyke-D:

You've miscalculated once again.

PRIORITIZE: stands for arranging or organizing "to do list"[/b]according to the importance of the duties.

Eventhough PRIORITIZE is part of leadership concept, but has absolutely nothing to do with this subject.

Again, the main idea of this topic is the word [b]"SELECTIVITY"

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Ribadu, Ribadu, Ribadu, Ribadu;

May be George Bush should also change his name to Ribadu; may be he will get couple of more people on his side to worship his failure in Iraq.

My man, like I've said before, this issue has absolutely nothing to do with Ribadu. Infact Ribadu happens to still be one of my favorite Nigerians, I truly admire his dedication.

But at the same time, there must be no room for failure. We must be courageous and bold enough to be able to point out failure when it exists (confrontation, tenacity, correction and compassion); that is what leadership is all about, my man.

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BigB1,

I hope you never attain a leadership position in any meaningful organization

because that might spell the beginning of its downfall. In all facet of life, be it

public or private, one must PRIORITIZE.

The EFCC was formed not to replace the Nigerian Police, but as a special unit

that will target economic crimes, that is crimes that are injurious to the nation

and its economy. If every Nigerian steals N1, the N150million stolen will be a

drop in the bucket compared to a few Nigerian that steals a N1trillion - does

that make sense at all to you?

That is the main reason while for its flaws, the majority of Nigerians are in

support of Ribadu and his men. It was rumored earlier on that Ribadu was

to be replaced, but the fact that he is still running the EFCC demonstrates

that the greater majority Nigerians are on their side.

Apologies accepted by the way.

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Iyke-D:

If you live in United States, how would you feel if a police office pulls you over just because you're BLACK?

That is the meaning of judgement based on selectivity, and this is also the main idea of this topic.

Forget EFCC or OBJ, and please let me know what will be the appropriate treatment for this officer.

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@Segunusaid:

You're absolutely right, you can now go back to work!

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Obviously you know absolutely nothing about equality, human rights, empowerment of the constitution and drastic repercussion of judgement that is based on selectivity.

My man, we are not talking about market place conflict, we are talking about the enforcement of Nigerian constitution.

What is wrong with you?

Looking at the roles that is played by EFCC in Nigeria, it is purely senseless to base any corruption judgement on calculation of Kobo and Naira. It just doesn't work that way.

The person that freely steals 1 Naira today will surely steal 100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 Naira tomorrow, hence Mr. Iyke-D, you're not making any sense.

All cases regarding corruption must be treated absolutely equally under every circumstance.

You need to stop this asinine argument, pleasssssssssseeeeeeeee

Definitely, you're not Mckren and I'm very sorry to even compare the two.

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Brilliance now has new a definition!

BigB1

Treating a crime of N1 as if its equal to a crime of N1trillion is not brilliant but pure lunacy! How much is

Nigeria's entire budget for last year?

Gosh isn't any surprise that someone like you considers IBB a genius? a genius from the backside allright!

Finally, the information regarding Atiku and Jefferson's dealing as described above is factually incorrect!

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B1 or whatever,

It seems to me that you re virtually oblivion of the situation that has to do with corruption in the Nigerian state. In fact your post did not only reveal your shallowness but to a large exent your ignorance about the institution you re quick to trample under your sponsored jackboot.

If you re a student of history or better still a student of contemporary Nigerian politics, you should be grateful to God that in the history of this great country no administration has attempted in this manner to tackle corruption as the Obasanjo admininstration.

As a matter of fact it was only in the last administration that public official has ever been convicted of corruption and instead of joining hands to support the good work of EFCC you re crying foulplay.

If you ve the understanding that corruption is a deep rooted problem that has defied all known strategies you will not be rubishing the effort of the government at fighting a monster that is reducing Nigerian masses to poverty and penury

To come to think of it , are you telling us that you re more patriotic than the Obasanjo of this world or the Ribadu who has put his life on the line to ensure that the monster of corruption is tamed in Nigeria. one thing you should realise is that Rome was not built in a day, it is even a good omen to see a government agency fighting corruption or maybe you don't know that it is public sector corruption that crippled the nigerian economy.

Pls go and resaerched this topic very well because you re argument is not consistent reality.

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Mckren,

That was a simple question, that required just a YES or NO; aboslutely no need to write a book.

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whatever the hell that means, i'd rather you get a life my man. this ain't leading you nowhere son.

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all of you are a bunch of useless big headed tramps.

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Useless people!!!!!!!  Let EFCC also concentrate on all the wealth stored by Northern Nigerians in the Swiss Bank and Arab countries--especially United Arab Emirates with their yearly jihads.  Rubbish!!!!!

Is it not from Nigeria all the money laundering originates and make their way to banks in foreign countries?  From all the "Otumba/Alhaji/Ogbuefi owned banks?  Now the "Nigerian government" wants to "mount" pressure on others to do its dirty work.  Useless people! 

I do not know why this British people keep playing this game.  American or Swiss government would never cater to such nonsense--like the Uba case.  Just send them home scott free and let the Nigerians deal with the mess they created in the first case.  What is the point returning "loot" that will be "re-looted"?

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OBJ personalised the functions of the EFCC so much that you are innocent as long as you are in OBJ's good books

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Maybe you should sharpen your reading/research skills, the EFCC case against Atiku wasn't about $100,000.

Brilliant - you don't see any difference between a man that steals N1 and another that steals 1trillion pounds?

The state should exhibit the same zeal chasing the man that stole N1 even if it means spending N10million to

prosecute the case? With this kind of brilliance, its no surprise that Nigeria is a shining example of justice before

the world. We are always righteous about the wrong things!

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The issue of EFCC is that of half bread being better than non. The agency did witch-hunting for OBJ. Nobody cares to explain why T(c)hiefs Lamidi Adedibu, Olabode George et al have not been arrested up till this moment by the EFCC, whereas people like Otumbas Adenuga and Fasewe are being bandied as corrupt men.

Mallam Ribadu have on countless occasions confirmed the formers culpability, but has done nothing to bring them to justice. We know that the EFCC has arrested some corrupt people and had even prosecuted some. My worry is that the agency is persecuting those it has no evidence of corrupt enrichment against.

As regards the sons of IBB and OBJ, corrupt enrichment is the same, the amount involved notwithstanding. Both cases must be treated equally without any resort to ad hominems. Justice is blind, therefore, does not see whether one has stolen 1 naira or if another has stolen trillions of pounds. Let's get things right. Didn't EFCC spend tax payers money to go for a wild goose chase when it accused Alhaji Atiku of taking a $100,000 bribe from Mr. Jafferson? Why can't it spend same to pursue a case of $500,000 which is 5x bigger?

EFCC should wake up, let the truth be told. With all the foreign financial assistance it has been recieving, it must not be seen as anybody's cats paw.

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My man, the benchmark for failure in Nigeria is higher than Mount Kilimanjaro.

The question is: how far and how long are we willing to push this old defective car?

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the efcc can not be described as a failure my man, for them to be put in that class you must have something to benchmark them against.

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Absolutely inaccurate.

This has nothing to do with IBB; the man is appeased with his current position, everyone has moved on.

Big B1 doesn't hate EFCC, he only hates failure (constant failure).

Infact, I have realized that many have decided to sabotage all my ideas or recommendations, regardless of the content of the message (whether it's positive or negative), just because of my incompressible support for IBB.

I see this as being barbaric and absolutely not in agreement with or according to democratic doctrine.

One should not be judged or undermined just because of his or her choice of political candidates. It is not right, not acceptable and a nation can not move forward with this type of awful mentality.

Up EFCC, long life failure!

It seems to me that many of us are just simply immune to habitual failure.

We shall all see the end result.

May God bless Nigeria

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It is because out of all the agencies, the EFCC is the only one putting tax payer's money to good use. In Big B1's case, he hates the EFCC because they had a hand in stopping IBB's ambition to rule Nigeria again.

If you look back through his previous posts, you will find that this is fact.

Long live the EFCC.

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perhaps we all need to be whacked with spiked clubs afterall.

some of the tactics employed by the efcc are controversial and questionable, but hey, we are talking about nigeria here, why do we need to paint a cob to make it look like a cat? setting up a new anti corruption is as good as reforming the efcc, in my opinion the latter is easier and more feasible.

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Instead of walking around freely and boldly, you guys will be surprised to see how many governors that will disappear for good as soon as a newly implemented anti corruption organization is introduced.

The prayer of many of these thieves is for EFCC to remain in Nigeria forever and ever. They clearly understand that as long as EFCC stays around, they (the thieves) remain untouchable.

And I truly do not understand why we find it very difficult to understand this fact. May be some of us need to be whacked on the head with a wooden stick to wake up and see the light.

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It is absolutely impossible for folks to have a reasonable discussion with out mentioning that name "IBB".

Damn, the man has been gone for many many years and still many just can't leave that name alone.

Why don't you just ask EFCC to go and arrest IBB?

The last time I checked, EFCC as a failed organization is still the main idea of this discussion; let's remain focused, IBB did not implement this organization.

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BigB1

Oh, so like inviting or arresting IBB's son to explain his relationship to a 24% stake of a billion

dollar organization is out of line? Most especially when that holding company list a property owned by the same IBB's son as its mailing address?

I understand why "they" are mad as hell with Ribadu because he crossed the red line. The ultra

rich in Nigeria - the IBBs and Adenugas have gotten so used to being above the law, that they didn't

think it was necessary to honor an invitation from the EFCC to answer a few questions. They went

on with their air of invisibility until Ribadu woke them from their slumber and sent them running for

cover.

Finally, if as a leader, you don't understand the difference between spending $1million to reclaim

a $500,000 asset for the state versus spending $1million to reclaim $240million, then may God help

whatever it is you are managing. Yes justice can not be reduced to matter of naira and kobo, but at

the same time the justice system can not be funded adequately if the state is broke. Maybe you

haven't heard but there is such a thing as severity of offense, hence they are sentencing guidelines.

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davidyland@yahoo.com

Is it going to make you feel better if I send you an email?

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Furthermore, it is very sad and a big shame that this is how most of us see things. And this is also one of the reasons why we find absolutely nothing wrong with the way EFCC operates.

Unbelievable!

It is not about kobo and naira; it's about doing your job accordingly, professionally, lawfully and fairly (all belong to the same parents).

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I don't know what you do for a living, but my man, with this mentality you've just displayed, you have just totally incapacitated yourself.

That question also happens to be a leadership 101 question.

EFCC mission or objective is not for profit, their accomplishment is not measured by calculating Kobo and Naira; this is an organization that is implemented to enforce the law.

I'm not sure if you truly understand the mighty role of EFCC; Please, quickly get familiar with it because you're starting not to make any sense anymore,

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