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Who Killed Major Nzeogwu?

http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/max-siollun/who-killed-major-nzeogwu.html

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So, its safe to say you're liable to kill someone whom you eat in his house and whom his kids refer to you as uncle, just because you both knew the "consequences going-in".

Ok, cool, lets give you that. WHY KILL HIS WIFE THEN? AND WHY IN FRONT OF THE KIDS?

Oh well, I don't expect a reasonable answer from you. You already attested above that you're traitorous and would betray in a heartbeat. What a loser.

And I used to think Nzeogwu was a hero. . . . . .

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bottom line . . . . . Nzeogwu is a criminal, period!

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. . . he is a criminal!

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The daughter of Brigadier-General Samuel Ademulegun, the then GOC Ist Division, Kaduna, has narrated how Nzeogwu made her and her siblings orphans during the ill-fated coup. Today, Mrs. Solape Ademulegun-Agbi, proprietress of Hillcroft Schools, may be a fully-grown woman. But the trauma of having both parents shot in her presence has left an indelible mark. Reacting to a story captioned, Return My Son’s Body, Nzeogwu’s Mother Begs Obasanjo, recently published in Saturday Sun, Ademulegun-Agbi said that Nzeogwu’s mother wanted her son to be treated as a hero, whereas he could actually pass as a villain.

But her sores were made the more painful when she recalls that Major Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu was a welcome guest who always relished a meal of pounded yam any time he came calling at the Ademuleguns.

She spoke to Daily Sun. Excerpts:

General Ademulegun

My dad is everything you would love in a father. Very caring, hardworking and dedicated. He was in love with horse-riding and he made sure I owned one. I named my horse Santana. I used to ride Santana to school in those days, so when the Volkswagen Santana came into the market, it really brought back memories of those days. As a typical Ondo man, my dad was fond of eating pounded yam with the full complement of cow-leg. Generally, he was a wonderful father who more often than not, hoisted me on his broad shoulders. These are some of the memories that have kept me going all these years.

The 1966 coup

My parents, Brigadier-General Samuel and Hajia Latifat Ademulegun were killed during the 1966 coup. That particular experience was quite traumatic and I have never been able to overcome it. At a point, I had phobia for anything military. My dad was the then General Officer Commanding (GOC) 1st Division, Kaduna and his army number was N3 which makes him the third highest-ranking officer in the Nigerian Army. Major Nzeogwu was a welcome guest in my parents’ home. He will always come to our house for steaming hot meal of pounded yam. Being Ondo State indigenes, pounded yam was a regular meal in my mother’s kitchen. On the day of the coup, Nzeogwu came calling with some other soldiers in the wee hours of the day. I think they were about six soldiers. As an impressionable young girl of six, that was quite a number. There were guns everywhere. I remember vividly that I was down with chicken pox, so I had the opportunity of sleeping in my parents’ room. My immediate younger brother was also sleeping soundly in a cot in the same room. But when Nzeogwu came in, there was little talking. I even called him uncle, but he was the one that shot my mother in the chest. She didn’t die immediately, but she was rolling on the floor, gasping and bleeding. With the last ounce of her breath, she was calling “Kole, Kole” (my immediate elder brother whose room was nearby). But my brother never heard because he hid under his bed when the gunshots were booming. I don’t know who killed my dad because he was dragged out of the bedroom. The batman, who was in the boys quarters polishing my dad’s shoes, and our housemaid, one Gbelle, shepherded us out of the bedroom. These memories are ever so green in my heart. A child remembers bad things more than the good.

Life after the coup

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You know, I hate it when people gather around and begin to use semantics to sell a box full of bricks as a wide screen tv.

Whats all these nonsense? Why should a propganda write up designed to excuse culpability for the coup be even cheered by people that say they are intelligent. . . .where's the intelligence when the story in front of you already contradicts itself three or four times in different paragraphs of its context?

How could Nzeogwu who has a primary attribute as a hardcore rebellion and suspected and kept at distance by Ojukwu then not rebelled against Biafra and cross into Federal side, if indeed he was genuinely against secession? Is it that he selectively rebels when it suits his purpose? What does his friendship with OBJ has to do with the reality of his atrocities? Somebody killed selective leaders outside of ethnic tribe and because he is friend with some people, then he must not be the monster he was painted to be. I dont get it!

Nzeogwu is a criminal and untill proven otherwise, I am steadfast on that convinction. This propaganda story is handicapped by its own counter positions and therefore not convincing enough to shift me.

Do you know how many of these military officers were close friends in their junior ranks but ambition and greed turned them against one another later in career? , Look at IBB and Mamman Vatsa. Who could ever believe that IBB will kill his close ally Vatsa?

Dont use that nonsensicasl Nzaogwu /OBJ/Bali paddy-paddy connection for redeeming a criminal.

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Very interesting thread. Noticed its about 3 years old. Nairaland seems to have been more fun before. Now there's beef in every thread

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With all these murders credited to nzeogwu's name how can he be still regarded by some as a nationalist? That bloke was a cold blooded murderer simple! those who removed his eyes were even lenient he deserved to be cut into pieces.

may he rot in the hottest part of HELL!

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Naijaking, do you have the book yet? Please do let me have your feedback when you have finished reading it.

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true.

I'm reading a very detailed account of the events of Jan 1966 and they're quite grisly, to say the least.

I havent gotten around to analysing your book yet, I'm afraid. Maybe I should take time off Nairaland to read it.

I have quite a few books on Nigerian history I'm trying to go through and I really dont know when I'll finish them all.

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How are we supposed to know that?

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I don't dispute your findings. My point about Aloy~Emeka has been going on since last 2 months. Call it hero-worship, superstition, or jest: I have a personal experience of Hausa people taking Igbo names for whatever reasons. While the findings in your book about Nzeogwu and Aloy~Emeka maybe mere coincidence, I like to state that it happens more often than people know.

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I think the plucking of Nzeogwu's eyes had to do with mystical beliefs. Probably whomever did it somehow thought they'd acquire the warrior attributes of Nzeogwu after doing so. Recall that some of the Liberian rebels engaged in cannibalism believing that eating their enemies would transfer their enemies strengths to them.

Another strange phenomenon during the July 1966 counter coup in Nigeria was northern soldiers addressing themselves by the names/ranks of Igbo soldiers they murdered. They maintained the pretence that they could "become" the men they killed.

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That was the theme of your book?

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Many of Nzeogwu's friends fought for the federal army. Most of his friends were northerners. Even people like Danjuma, Hassan Katsina etc knew him very well. OBJ was abroad while the an 1966 coup was being hatched. He arrived back in Nigeria just a few days before the coup was execited.

Soldiers in Nigeria often change loyalty. Some of the soldiers who assisted Ifeajuna and Nzeogwu in their coup were involved in the northern revenge coup 6 months later. Then 9 years later these same officers overthrew the man the brought to power in 1966 (Gowon). The same officers overthrew Shagari in 1983 and Buhari in 1985. See how soldiers seemingly on the same side can turn on each other?

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If OBJ ever had anything close to a friend, Nzeogwu was it. It would be pretty normal to question their friendship during the first coup saga and the subsequent war. I have read OBJ's autobiography and a number of books over that period, but it is still hazy to comprehend what really went on between both of them.

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No, you don't. That's the unspoken question many people have been asking right from time.

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Well, this was a period when Nigeria was very complex.

Sometimes while reading Nigeria's history, It's like am in some kind of action adventure movie. Today though everything is so lazy and annoying.

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thanks.

I do find it strange that he was that close to Nzeogwu who led a revolution and fought for the Biafran side, yet he (OBJ) fought on the Nigerian side and also managed to not be openly involved Nzeogwu's coup?

maybe I'm getting confused but something seems fishy.

I could also have an overactive imagination, I guess.

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Tpia:

1) OBJ was a very good friend and former room mate of Maj Nzeogwu. OBJ was in Kaduna when the Jan 1966 coup occured.

2) During the civil war he commanded the 3rd Marine Commando division and it was he who led the decisive breakthrough that ended the war.

3) He did not arrest IBB or any other "famous coup plotter".

4) After the civil war he became head of the army's engineers unit.

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most likely a repayment for his involvement in the first coup.

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@ bolded

interesting!

corpse mutilation is a sign of secret society involvement, I think. At least that's what I heard.

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Tpia - you should get the book. you would enjoy it.

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thanks.

I just wonder where OBJ was and what he was doing from 1965 through 1971.

or before and after all the turmoil/s.

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OBJ cried when Nzeogwu was killed and chastised the men that celebrated his death.

Kaduna was a Nationalist or better still a Pan African. I don't know what he'd be doing in the separatist army. Also, he was one of the first counter intelligence officers of the Nigerian Army so the official Nigerian Military burial given to his body by the then military government raises questions about which side he was working for. Also there's the fact that his body was mutilated while in the morgue in Nsukka.

Well, I believe the man was an ideal Nigerian and and selfless human being. I respect him a lot. With more people like him, I don't think this country would be in the mood it is today.

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@tpia

I'm not an authority like Max, but I know that OBJ and Nzeogwu were good friends/room mates.

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what's the relationship between OBJ and Nzeogwu.

where was was OBJ during the events of 1966?

I think he once arrested a famous coup plotter (or was that IBB), didnt he?

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Good job Max. I can't wait for my copy of the complete book to arrive from Amazon. Once again, thanks for an apperently well written and researched book on an important chapter of Nigerian history.

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