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Have U Christians Heard Of The Council Of Nicea?

the council seems to be where the idea of trinity originated from.

The Nicene Creed introduced the word "homoousious" or "consubstantial" meaning "of one substance." This word was not invented at the Council. Eusebius writes that some of the "most learned and distinguished of the ancient bishops had made use of consubstantial in treating of the divinity of the Father and the Son" (See document E in the Appendix, Baker). We do not have the sources that Eusebius must have had regarding the use of this word. Today, the only source is Origen who used the word in what seems the orthodox way (Johannes Quastren, "Patrology," Volume 2, p78). However, this phrase of Eusebius stands as a witness to the existence of wider use.

The bishops assembled at Nicea were careful to explain how they used the word, and what it meant. This is because it had been misused by Paul of Samosta. Regarding this unorthodox usage, St. Hilary and St. Basil say that it was said to be "unfit to describe the relation between the Father and the Son" at a council that met in Antioch (Ibid, p14). Apparently Paul of Samosta applied the word in a manner that implied division of nature, as several coins are from the same metal (Baker, p21).

Alexander of Alexandria had called a meeting of the presbyters [priests]. According to the historian Socrates, the aging "pope" [some early senior bishops were called "papa," that is, "father"] "with perhaps too philosophical minuteness" began to lecture on the theological mystery of the Holy Trinity. Alexander had been discussing the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost for some time when he was interrupted by one of the presbyters called Arius, a native of Libya. There is no evidence that Alexander was a profound theologian. He may have bumbled, and it is possible that Arius was justified in accusing Alexander of Sabellianism, a heresy that involved a belief in the unity of God at the expense of the reality of the Trinity. But in combating Alexander, Arius fell into a new heresy, for he announced, "If the Father begat the Son, then he who was begotten had a beginning in existence, and from this it follows there was a time when the Son was not". Here, at some time in 319, the cry of the Arians--"There was a time when the Son was not"--was first heard. The words were to have an extraordinary influence on the shaping of the church. They were dynamite and split the church in two, and these words, which read in Greek like a line of a song, still echo down the centuries.

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/augustine/arch/sbrandt/nicea.htm

http://www.thunderministries.com/history/Nicea.html

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@syrup,

In any case syrup, you are holding down the forte very well here. Keep it up. You and pilgrim-1 are such a blessing, even though the hordes of you-know-who have managed to keep pilgrim-1 away from the forum.

I need to stand clear now and keep taking notes while you continue with your exegesis.

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@topic,

Was the Council of Nicea pre or post the following Bible verse? Colosians 2:9 because in him doth tabernacle all the fulness of the Godhead bodily

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Dear o dear o dear, syrup. You are letting words confuse you. I did not present to you a clever word play with the stem -thesis. By thesis, antithesis and synthesis I am suggesting (as indeed Hegel did ) that every proposition has it's opposite or negation. Up is NOT down. To exist is opposed by nonexistence. You can't start adding prefixes and saying well there is [b]HYPO[/b]existence and [b]Paren[/b]existence.

I repeat that for absolutely everything there is an opposition, a negation. And I go further to say that both the proposition and it's negation are derived from a third which is neither and both simulataneously. (At this point I differ from Hegel who only used it as a dialectic style).

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"The Trinity" is not Crone, Mother, and Maid. That might have been "a trinity" concept in paganism, and it was not something incorporated into Biblical faith.

Perhaps not many people have tried to examine the real claims of those claiming this pagan incorporation ideas. Well, I have heard the claim that "everything" might have a 'three' aspect trinitarian philosophy - but that is actually not sound. Let me use a few examples:

Actually, the philosophy of the "thesis" is quite limiting - and that is precisely what many 'pagan-trinity' thinkers use as allegories for their persuasions. However, the "thesis"-link has more than 3 connotations:

* Anti[b]thesis[/b]

* Dia[b]thesis[/b]

* Hypo[b]thesis[/b]

* Paren[b]thesis[/b]

* Syn[b]thesis[/b]

* Thesis

There are more, but those are the ones I can presently remember.

Many people have been carried away with the charge that Christianity incorporated this-that-and-the-other from paganism. Please do yourself the favour of querying those assumptions by the more rigorous investigative thinking than those employed by authors who offer unsound scholarship in Christian thought. Quite often, those neo-paganistic theories have not been able to stand their own litmus.

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Well Me I know that trinity existed in paganism long time before christianity. It is quite likely that along with Christmas, Sunday Worship, Easter bunny worship etc Trinity was incorporated into christianity from the surrounding pagan religions. Actually it was mainly the Goddesses that were worshipped as a trinity. The Trinity was usually Crone, Mother, and Maid.

Also trinity is woven into the very fabric of the world and into the way we percieve things and process information. Thesis, Antithesis, and Synthesis. It is mathematical, geometrical and absolute. Everything has a opposite and both have a common source, and together they make three.

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@Syrup: I wish you and your a restful memorial day. Enjoy yourself. But in the maintime, please use your own yardstick of Council of Nisea being an after the development of the Trinity docrine to debase it, for your New Testatment and Old tastament, therefore.

We see that the OT mainly Moses revealed Book completely disagree that God Almighty could ever be more than One singly Lord! He Moses did not hear more than One Voice at the Burning Bush. All the Time he had an audience with his Lord, there is always One God speaking. There was never a time that there was a sense of the Singly God convering with anyone and there was never a desention or interjection from any one; seen or unseen.

It will be very safe to say that Jesus and Holy Ghost were none persona grata in their relationship to The Almighty God. It is the after the raising up of Jesus to heaven that someone or group of people developed the concept of Trinity among themself. This brings about the point of lying or bearing false witness to the forefront again. Someone lied against Jesus, the Holy ghost and God Almighty. Someone bore false witness against Jesus, th Holy Ghost and God Almighty.

Just because something was written or said before a new idea came about to refute it, does not necessarily mean that it is right. The old idea that is.

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@bawomolo,

The Trinity is not an "obvious" concept to anyone - not even those you referenced and others who question the doctrine are agreed on their conclusions, and one should wonder why they are not 'universally agreed' among themselves.

One helpful way of looking at the subject would be the time in history when the basic tenets were recognized as established. The Council of Nicea took place very long after documents recognized as the Scriptures have been established. By way of broadening this point, one may ask if it was right there at the Council of Nicea that the Scriptures were written. If that is not the case, then those who tend to read and interpret it from that point alone are failing in their assumptions already.

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why wasn't there a universal agreement on the trinity?? u'd think the trinity would be an obvious concept for ur mystery god

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Wikipedia presents a balanced view of issues. I recommend it for you.

The Trinity had been around long before the Council of Nicea. See -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinity_of_the_Church_Fathers

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come on guys, i know u have heard of the council of nicea

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There a very good book written in prose style about the events leading up to the Council of Nicea, The Arian Controversy. If you can grab a copy, I will urge you to. Very entertaining. It is called "When Jesus Became God" by Richard Rubenstein.

Checkout the reviews on Amazom. http://www.amazon.com/When-Jesus-Became-God-Christianity/dp/0156013150/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1203442899&sr=8-1

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@therationa and bawomol(o)

Please read about the Council of Nicea[b] very well [/b]before jumping to biased conclusions.

Start here -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Council_of_Nicaea

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yes we have read it, now explain why the idea of trinity was brought up in nicea. why do u always run to wikipedia??

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