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Humanism - The Sensible Replacement For Religion?

Just as the God's of the Egyptian dynasties were replaced with Christianity and Islam, it goes without saying that the religions and God's of today will also be replaced in the coming years.

The many different God's of the Greeks and the Egyptians lasted thousands of years. Christianity and Islam is still young by comparison, but just as the Greek and Egyptian God's came and went, the same is sure to happen with the current God or God's.

The question is not if religion will be replaced but when and by what. We are already seeing a huge decline in church attendance as Churches fail to adapt to the World in which we live.

One of the most sensible possible replacements for today's aging religions has to Humanism.

Humanism is defined in the encyclopedia as:

A broad category of active ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appealing to universal human qualities—particularly rationalism. A society in which the human being, with his needs and aspirations, is the central value. A society in which human rights are completely realized: the right to health, instruction, freedom, spirituality, search for the meaning of life, and an existence with dignity.

Humanism is a progressive philosophy of life that, without supernaturalism, affirms our ability and responsibility to lead ethical lives of personal fulfillment that aspire to the greater good of humanity.

Are you a humanist?

Do you try to live an ethical and fulfilling life without religious belief?

Do you think science and reason lead to more reliable knowledge than faith?

Do you support secular government and an open society that guarantees human rights for all?

If you answered "yes" to these questions, you might be one of the millions of humanists on Earth -- people who live meaningful, fulfilling lives based on reason and compassion.

Humanism is a philosophy of life inspired by humanity and guided by reason. It provides the basis for a fulfilling and ethical life without religion.

Humanists make sense of the world using reason, experience and shared human values.

Humanists see no convincing evidence for gods, the supernatural, or life after death.

Humanists believe that moral values are properly founded on human empathy and scientific understanding.

Humanists believe we must live this life on the basis that it is the only life we'll have -- that, therefore, we must make the most of it for ourselves, each other, and our world.

Humanist philosophies have arisen separately in many different cultures over many thousands of years. Whether or not they use the term humanism, tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of millions of people around the world agree with the humanist philosophy of living a happy and productive life based on reason and compassion.

Humanism has to be the way forward to end the manipulation that is religion, segregation of human kind and stem the tide of sectarian violence that is so active in today's World.

Are you a Humanist?

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14 answers

So can you please explain to us how humanism intends to go about delivering on it's promises.

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Yes there are humanists in the house.

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I think humanism should be the way to go

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I don't know why nobody continued to contribute on this thread. Everytime I join a thread the thread just stops shaaa, it is very puzzling.

Any humanists in the house?

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There has never been a religion or ideology worth it's salt that starts off by promising too little. It's just not the nature of these things. I have serious doubts whether 'humanism' can deliver on any of it's claims. but hey ho such is the way things of these sort go.

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If humanism was right in holding the man is born to be completely happy on earth; he [man] will NOT be born to die.

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Interesting and common sense Humanistic facts

1. Humanism is one of those philosophies for people who think for themselves. There is no area of thought that a Humanist is afraid to challenge and explore.

2. Humanism is a philosophy focused upon human means for comprehending reality. Humanists make no claims to possess or have access to supposed transcendent knowledge.

3. Humanism is a philosophy of reason and science in the pursuit of knowledge. Therefore, when it comes to the question of the most valid means for acquiring knowledge of the world, Humanists reject arbitrary faith, authority, revelation, and altered states of consciousness.

4. Humanism is a philosophy of imagination. Humanists recognize that intuitive feelings, hunches, speculation, flashes of inspiration, emotion, altered states of consciousness, and even religious experience, while not valid means to acquire knowledge, remain useful sources of ideas that can lead us to new ways of looking at the world. These ideas, after they have been assessed rationally for their usefulness, can then be put to work, often as alternate approaches for solving problems.

5. Humanism is a philosophy for the here and now. Humanists regard human values as making sense only in the context of human life rather than in the promise of a supposed life after death.

6. Humanism is a philosophy of compassion. Humanist ethics is solely concerned with meeting human needs and answering human problems--for both the individual and society--and devotes no attention to the satisfaction of the desires of supposed theological entities.

7. Humanism is a realistic philosophy. Humanists recognize the existence of moral dilemmas and the need for careful consideration of immediate and future consequences in moral decision making.

8. Humanism is in tune with the science of today. Humanists therefore recognize that we live in a natural universe of great size and age, that we evolved on this planet over a long period of time, that there is no compelling evidence for a separable "soul," and that human beings have certain built-in needs that effectively form the basis for any human-oriented value system.

9. Humanism is in tune with today's enlightened social thought. Humanists are committed to civil liberties, human rights, church-state separation, the extension of participatory democracy not only in government but in the workplace and education, an expansion of global consciousness and exchange of products and ideas internationally, and an open-ended approach to solving social problems, an approach that allows for the testing of new alternatives.

10. Humanism is in tune with new technological developments. Humanists are willing to take part in emerging scientific and technological discoveries in order to exercise their moral influence on these revolutions as they come about, especially in the interest of protecting the environment.

11. Humanism is, in sum, a philosophy for those in love with life. Humanists take responsibility for their own lives and relish the adventure of being part of new discoveries, seeking new knowledge, exploring new options. Instead of finding solace in prefabricated answers to the great questions of life, Humanists enjoy the open-endedness of a quest and the freedom of discovery that this entails.

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Told you before: not saying much until later. For now, I've left the above on the persuasion that those who call themselves humanists do not banter to any expression of "religion" pr "spirituality".

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@Baricade

There are several forms of Humanism and the concept is extremely flexible:

Religious humanism

Religious humanism is the branch of humanism that considers itself religious (based on a functional definition of religion), or embraces some form of theism, deism, or supernaturalism, without necessarily being allied with organized religion, as such. If they do, religious humanists often associate themselves with Unitarian Universalism. It is often associated with artists, liberal Christians, and scholars in the liberal arts. Other types of people that may be considered religious humanists are those who, despite believing in a religion, don't consider it necessary to derive all their moral values from it. Some feel that, because their religious beliefs are moral, and therefore humane, they are humanists. In particular, it is not uncommon for religious humanitarians to be referred to as humanists, although the accuracy of this usage is disputed.

A number of religious humanists feel that secular humanism is too coldly logical and rejects the full emotional experience that makes humans human. From this comes the notion that secular humanism is inadequate in meeting the human need for a socially fulfilling philosophy of life. Disagreements over things of this nature have resulted in friction between secular and religious humanists, despite their similarities.

The point you have mentioned about spirituallity maybe valid, but concerning meaning in life it could not be further from the truth.

Meaning in Life is covered by the word Optimism

Humanism features an optimistic attitude about the capacity of people, but it does not involve believing that human nature is purely good or that each and every person is capable of living up to the humanist ideals of rationality and morality. If anything, there is the recognition that living up to one's potential is hard work and requires the help of others. The ultimate goal is human flourishing; making life better for all humans. Even among humanists who do believe in some sort of an afterlife, the focus is on doing good and living well in the here and now, and leaving the world better for those who come after, not on suffering through life to be rewarded afterward.

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I'm not saying much for now until those two emboldened words play themselves out in coming days. Hint: real humanism does not believe in spirituality or meaning in life.

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