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Just How Tough Are You ?

Will you board a plane if the guy setting next to you in the waiting room to board the same plane was reading the Holy Quran ?

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14 answers

for real tho,

i honestly think this topic only fuels stereotype and racial hatred.

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on my way to Nigeria way back when i sat next to this Muslim (she sat on the left) woman and her husband sat behind her. and that never even crossed my mind. lol

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You men of little faith, if he pulls out his own then you pull out ya bible and start reading.

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u are crazy and mad for starting dis ish!!!

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Well, i must be honest to say this: last Tuesday (5th January), i boarded a train from Belfast Central to Dublin Connolly, and i found my comfortable seat in the middle coach. Without bothering to look at fellow travellers, i took my seat just two rows before some guys that i paid no attention to. As the journey progressed, i didn't realise that the 2 guys (who were sitting two rows) behind me were speaking an Asian language until i heard "al'lah akbar, alla'h akbar", the guys seemed to be giving praises to Al'lah pertaining something favourable. I turned to look at the guys, they were bearded and traditionally dressed and one was carrying a sort of traditional bag similar to those of hare Krishna. Oh my goodness, I've never been so frightened before by mere thoughts of the unknown possibilities, i thought i had to run away before bomb-blast prevents me from doing so. I wanted to be a little more polite in my action, but the fear was real there and delay could be dangerous; so, i took my mobile phone out of my pocket, and by pretending that i was talking to someone else in the train, i took my hand luggage and dashed out of the endangered couch to another coach at the far rear of the train: You know, in every bomb-blast news, we hear things like 12 people killed and 99 people injured, so, i thought if there would be a bomb-blast and if i must be affected, then let be among the injured howbeit, not severely

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That description meets more than 60% of the people i've flown with constantly in a four-year period post 9-11, post london bombings

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6 Islamic clerics kicked off airplane settle civil rights lawsuit

Posted:  10/21/2009 1:20 AM

More News >>

Nearly three years after the man in Row 25 of the U.S. Airways flight jotted his concerns about six "suspicious Arabic men" on a piece of paper and handed it to a flight attendant, the legal battle spawned by the note is over.

Six Muslim imams kicked off a U.S. Airways flight at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport, detained and then released have settled their federal civil rights suit against the airline, the public commission that runs the airport and the FBI.

The settlement was reached after a court-ordered negotiating session that lasted more than seven hours Monday at the federal courthouse in St. Paul. Its terms are confidential and will remain so even after the document is finalized and filed with the court, lawyers in the case said.

The settlement left neither side declaring outright victory, just relief.

"We're glad it is finally resolved," said Ibrahim Hooper, a spokesman for the  Council on American-Islamic Relations, which represented the imams, or prayer leaders. "I can't give any details other than to say the case was resolved to the satisfaction of all parties and we view it as a victory for justice and civil rights."

"We're just confirming the settlement. We're not going to comment," said Valerie Wunder, a spokesman for U.S. Airways.

The Metropolitan Airports Commission issued a statement saying its officers "did what they believed was appropriate to ensure the safety of travelers based on the information available at the

time."

The statement also said the commission's insurance company settled on MAC's behalf.

The plaintiffs and defendants engaged the talents of 12 lawyers in five states, from New York to California.

The imams claimed they had been discriminated against by the airline and airport police caught up in a post-9/11 fervor that targeted people who appeared to be Muslims of Middle Eastern descent. In response, lawyers for the airline and airports commission said their employees acted appropriately.

In January, the U.S. Department of Transportation said that while the airline's decision to kick the imams off the plane "could be perceived by some as discriminatory in this circumstance," the agency believed the decision was reasonable "based on information available to the captain at the time."

But Mike McCombie, the California man whose note to a flight attendant led to the incident, said, "When they took them off the plane, I was kind of surprised. From what I saw, I don't think that would warrant being taken off the plane. I wasn't concerned in what I saw, in and of itself."

McCombie, who was not a party to the suit, said, "I never had the impression that, 'Oh, my gosh, there's some sort of imminent threat here.' "

In allowing the case to go to trial, U.S. District Judge Ann Montgomery said in July that "when a law enforcement officer exercises the power of the Sovereign over its citizens, she or he has the responsibility to operate within the bounds of the Constitution and cannot raise the specter of 9/11 as an absolute exception to that responsibility.

On the record before the court, no reasonable officer could have believed they could arrest plaintiffs without probable cause."

The suit stemmed from an incident on Nov. 20, 2006. The six imams were booked aboard U.S. Airways Flight 300 to Phoenix, returning home after attending a conference of the North American Imams Federation in Minneapolis.

The men were Omar Shahin, the federation's president and chair of the Arabic Department at the Arizona Cultural Academy; Ahmed Shqeirat, an imam at the Tempe Islamic Community Center; Didmar Faja, head of the Albanian American Islamic Center of Arizona; Marwan Sadeddin and Mahmoud Sulaiman, imams at the Islamic Community Center of Phoenix; and Mohamed Ibrahim, an imam in Bakersfield, Calif.

As they waited in the gate area before the flight boarded, four of the men recited Maghreb, the fourth of the five formal daily Muslim prayers. Maghreb comes just after sunset. The other two watched the group's luggage.

The men had passed through security without difficulty and had boarded the plane with no trouble. McCombie was one of the last to board, and once in his seat, he passed a note to a flight attendant saying the men were saying "Allah ,  Allah" and were "cursing U.S. involvement w/Saddam."

When the flight attendant gave McCombie's note to the flight's captain, John Howard Wood, he spoke with other flight attendants and U.S. Airways ground personnel and decided to have the men removed.

Wood said in an affidavit that his decision was based on McCombie's note, along with the fact that the men were seated throughout the cabin, a ploy allegedly used by hijackers in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Also, an airline employee had told the pilot that it appeared three of the men were traveling on one-way tickets and a flight attendant said two of the men had asked for seat-belt extenders.

As court filings later showed, though, the men had not picked their own seats; the airline had. All were traveling on round-trip tickets.

And Montgomery scoffed at the airline's notion of a seat-belt extender as a weapon, writing that "a sturdy belt with a large buckle" could be just as bad.

Agents with the FBI and the U.S. Secret Service questioned the imams. At 11:30 p.m., nearly six hours after they were supposed to have left on the flight, the imams were released from custody. No charges were filed.

The next morning, the imams tried booking seats on another U.S. Airways flight to Phoenix, but the airline turned them away.

The imams took a Northwest Airlines flight.

The following March, they sued.

http://m.twincities.com/twincities/db_11032/contentdetail.htm;jsessionid=D47EBA94CECAA94BD7184C37F7287836?full=true&contentguid=XV8lute8&pn=1&ps=5

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lollol that's definitely a bit unnerving

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He has a point though, obviously not all muslims are terrorists and I hate to generalize but sometimes one can't help but feel weary, what, with all these terrorist attacks occuring, it's almost like an instinct.

Islamaphobia, I believe I had this for quite some time after the bomb attacks in London, I couldn't help it.

Please, nobody take offence.

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Ogidi boy surely you are smarter than this

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na wa oh. so everyone dat recites the quran is now a potential terrorist. ignorance at the highest order

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Yes, I would. How many terrorists look obvious to anyone else?

It's usually what / who you don't see that blows your brains out!

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Yes ooooooo! Notin d Happen,

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