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How Important Is It To Be On Your Own?

From reading through this section, I have found out many people always talk about "doing something on the side" or "retiring early" etc. Is it really very important not to be working for someone? Those that are "strike out" minded, is not some people that will also work for you? How important is it to be independent/entrepreneurial career-wise?

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52 answers

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i want to start up something in african so that i can be my own boss and still work by the side

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This thread is really educative

I'm thinking of setting up a business in Lagos' i just don't know how to go about it and also the kind of business that has lower financial risk involved

Can anyone give any suggestion?

Thanks

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I read it a lot of years back and changed my worldview forever. It's more than an eye opener.

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In my own opinion,i will rightly put it dat self employment is d way out,now come 2 think of it u hear bank mass sack here & there,do u know that these family men & women who have a lot a responsibilites,some after being layed off by these bank can never ever be employed or under-employed.pls self employment will do it. I have changed my mind 4rm studing economics now to computer engr.what do u think about that,

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^^^^ man that was the best piece i ve ever read in years, it highligted every facet that empowers and cloggs enterpreneurship.a good piece if i might say.

nice one didier!! that piece just awakened something in me!!!

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For the entrepreneurs and would be entrepreneurs there is no doubt that entrepreneurship made the world what it is today, for example we wouldn't be exchanging all this information on nairaland if it wasn't for entrepreneurship and there are over a million similar examples i could give. Please click on this link (http://www.economist.com/specialreports/displayStory.cfm?story_id=13216025) for a special report on entrepreneurship in the march 2009 edition of The Economist.

note: You might have to register for a free 14 day pass to read the article, but believe me it is well worth the trouble.

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To be on your own takes a lot of courage.

You have something inside you that can make it happen.

it is the beginning of a new year if you want to be on your own,

start planning.

First, what do people need to solve their problems?

A transporter is providing solutions to commuters, doctors are providing health solutions.

You can also provide a solution after discovering a problem or problems.

Then solving the problem for the people will make you money and you can build your own business around it.

Somethings will never change there will always be needs and want that need attention so you can always make money.

hey, you place of employment is solving a problem so you can be on your own too.

if you want to be on your own start planning.

You can do it.

cheers!

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Which ever way we look at it , it is better to own your own business.

However, you need to prepare yourself for it because the challenges are enormous.

For experiense and money if you work for somebody it is good and perfect but we must  imbibe  having our own business.

-The first thing you need to do is to generate an idea that can work.

-write a business plan on our you can carry it out.

-then pursue it with vigour and you will soon be there.

it is not easy anyway but with determination you can do it.

cheers!

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it is the greatest thing that can happen to u,at initally,it might be tough but if u continue doing the right thing u will enjoy the ride

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It is not only important, it is the only important thing. Be your own boss.

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There is no gaying saying that Its paramount to have your own business. Having said that its not going to be a smooth ride. As you will be faced with a lot of challenges, but if you know what you want, with determination and second to none dos and don't (including formal training)of what makes a successful Entrepreneur.

The sky will be the beginning.

You might want to take a look at Cornea consulting Entrepreneurship and Business Planning training here http://www.cornea-consulting.com/

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to all those asking for ideas,i could help later in the day cos i hav to dash out but whatever you do,pls dont start a cafe business especially if you intend to serve the internet.your money go just disfarahan trust me.

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entrepreneurs build empires and in a country like nigeria,their bestest of leuitenants will forever be second fiddles.good example,a guy starts a business in 1980 and though small it begins to make sense especially after lasisi a very trusted second in command joins the venture putting in toil,blood and sweat like he were the owner of the business,however he only has an ond from yabatech.

Bimpe,our entrepreneurs first daughter is born in 1983 when ground still never level and they live around mafoluku in oshodi.fast forward to 2000,some zenith bank chick sees the business potential while luring our oga for his account seeing his turnover is in the hundreds of millions but sitting pretty in afribank and so she tells some pwc alumni about creating a business plan for oga meanwhile they now live in gbagada estate and bimpe just finished from airforce and on her way to a university of london college after a levels.lasisi still very faithful.

the pwc guys package the company tight for a hefty fee ,oga ships his account to zenith where he gets more money to expand his business,but the restructuring introduces more educated,younger and technical savvy people but since lasisi cannot be sacked ,he is made purchasing manager while he has a lot of superiors in his reporting line to oga.

2009 bimpe is through with  uni and masters and without thinking twice her dad makes her the e d operations.thank God she is brilliant and has been well schooled because her first management meeting outlining her vision for the business silenced all wagging tongues.

lasisi felt left out and frustrated especially as he knew all that was to know about the business and could never work for a girl he attended her christening.not long after he announced his retirement which made our entrepreneur who by now is a billionaire both happy and sad.happy that bimpe would have easier passage,sad lasisi was part of his success story.however blood is always thicker than water and so lasisi was paid off and started a rival business at almost 55.

lasisi is not hungry but after a few deals on his own he came to the conclusion he had wasted the last 15 years of his life.if he had ventured out earlier maybe at least one of his children would have had the privilege of a private university education talkless of schooling abroad.

steve ballmers and michael eisners are produced by a system which rewards attainment of set goals with part ownership.nigeria is however not yet there and believe me it is a fairy tale existence equating being an agm with job security.

and if you still doubt me,just talk to all the ogas that were recently laid off in all the banks.

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My people, there has been good contribution from since this thread started.

I refer a friend to read through all the comments here becuase he just lost his job at intercontinental bank(though cross from uba to intercontinental, he regrets his actions) am surprised he rides honda EOD 2005 i think still resides in a 300k apartment, now he is broke want to start cafe biz.

My people the truth of the matter is that it is not easy for people who earn good salary to leave their comfort zone and start something small, but my friend is learning in a hard way now.

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Here's an article that I got from Small Business Administration (www.sba.gov) about planing a business.

Is Entrepreneurship For You?

In business, there are no guarantees. There is simply no way to eliminate all the risks associated with starting a small business - but you can improve your chances of success with good planning, preparation, and insight. Start by evaluating your strengths and weaknesses as a potential owner and manager of a small business. Carefully consider each of the following questions:

• Are you a self-starter? It will be entirely up to you to develop projects, organize your time, and follow through on details.

• How well do you get along with different personalities? Business owners need to develop working relationships with a variety of people including customers, vendors, staff, bankers, and professionals such as lawyers, accountants, or consultants. Can you deal with a demanding client, an unreliable vendor, or a cranky receptionist if your business interests demand it?

• How good are you at making decisions? Small business owners are required to make decisions constantly - often quickly, independently, and under pressure.

• Do you have the physical and emotional stamina to run a business? Business ownership can be exciting, but it's also a lot of work. Can you face six or seven 12-¬hour workdays every week?

• How well do you plan and organize? Research indicates that poor planning is responsible for most business failures. Good organization ¬ of financials, inventory, schedules, and production ¬can help you avoid many pitfalls.

• Is your drive strong enough? Running a business can wear you down emotionally. Some business owners burn out quickly from having to carry all the responsibility for the success of their business on their own shoulders. Strong motivation will help you survive slowdowns and periods of burnout.

• How will the business affect your family? The first few years of business start¬up can be hard on family life. It's important for family members to know what to expect and for you to be able to trust that they will support you during this time. There also may be financial difficulties until the business becomes profitable, which could take months or years. You may have to adjust to a lower standard of living or put family assets at risk in the short-term.

Why Small Businesses Fail

Success in business is never automatic. It isn't strictly based on luck - although a little never hurts. It depends primarily on the owner's foresight and organization. Even then, of course, there are no guarantees.

Starting a small business is always risky, and the chance of success is slim. According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, roughly 50% of small businesses fail within the first five years.

In his book Small Business Management, Michael Ames gives the following reasons for small business failure:

• Lack of experience

• Insufficient capital (money)

• Poor location

• Poor inventory management

• Over-investment in fixed assets

• Poor credit arrangements

• Personal use of business funds

• Unexpected growth

Gustav Berle adds two more reasons in The Do It Yourself Business Book:

• Competition

• Low sales

More Reasons Why Small Businesses Fail

These figures aren't meant to scare you, but to prepare you for the rocky path ahead. Underestimating the difficulty of starting a business is one of the biggest obstacles entrepreneurs face. However, success can be yours if you are patient, willing to work hard, and take all the necessary steps.

On the Upside

It's true that there are many reasons not to start your own business. But for the right person, the advantages of business ownership far outweigh the risks.

• You will be your own boss.

• Hard work and long hours directly benefit you, rather than increasing profits for someone else.

• Earning and growth potential are far greater.

• A new venture is as exciting as it is risky.

• Running a business provides endless challenge and opportunities for learning.

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You can definitely invest part of your salary even with responsibilities (mortgages, car notes, family, student loans, savings etc). The key is to spend less than you earn – of course, easier said than done.

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Enlightening post, thanks yu'all

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Oyb, I think I know this guy. Lol! I'm not surprised at his success.

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Owning your own business is favorable; and so also is having a good job. 

Entrepreneurship is not for everyone. Many have tried and failed, while some have been successful. On the other hand, some people are not team-players and do not function well in a job setting. They prefer to run their own business and make their own decisions.

Both are important for different reasons to different people.

Owning a business is not beans. Basically, to be a successful entrepreneur you have to be purpose driven, innovative, self-motivated, dedicated, industrious, enduring, and very, very patient. It is not easy, it comes with a lot of risk, there is nothing like monthly salary, you are solely responsible for your business and for yourself, there will be loads of competition, and you may fall many times before you finally stand and break even or make a profit. Not everyone has this kind of discipline and liver.

Everything has its own advantages and disadvantages. You just need to figure out where your strengths lie and pursue that path. If you rush into business because your neighbor did likewise, you may just be setting yourself up for failure.

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Unfortunately my brother, I don't know what investments will be best you in your region seeing that I don't even live in Nigeria. But I will make research on your behalf.

Anyone else with tips, please help.

I stand corrected on the Nigerian Salary Investment even though I was more about investing your UK salary in the UK. I am yet to hear of that, again, I could be wrong.

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God bless you for this post. I've been thinking about this for long. Entrepreneurship, it seems to me, is the answer for now.

I'm in my 200 L in school, and thinking of creating one soon. Thanks guys for the info.

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therein lies the problem i guess

i actually read something like that somewhere, that the biggest enemy of your dreams is success in a lesser endeavor  - you feel you have something to lose

i had far more fire in me four years ago when i was working in my former employers office and earning a fifth of what i earn now

heck, back then i had big plans for writing a sci fi book/series

i had so much handwritten stuff, over a 100 used novels for research etal

i remember wishing then that if i had light all night long, i'd get round to finishing the book on a pc and er sending out the manuscript.

today, memories of it a in some dim recess in my mind - i sometimes tell myself i will try to strat it again, but. . .

a friend of mine has a slightly similar story. due finished with a third(civil engineer) bounced around for years on low salary jobs. he then got a job with some one man biz that had projecvts in ilorin. my friend was hired a site engineer. he was basically executing the contracts for the oga in lagos, and being paid peanuts. he noticed that the clients didn't really seem to get on well with his boss - apparently the guy was not settling them properly or some such. after a lot of reflection, he resigned created his company, walked up to the project oga of the client , said i'm on my own now. to wghich the PM replied about bloody time or some such, oya execute this for me - my friend is now a BIG boy, executing plenty projects in ilorin. he go soon become mafia for there.

but in the same way, i work with a lot of self employed contractors who are barely making ends meet.

i have been thinking - not as hard as i should - about alternative streams of income based on my skill set (computer stuff and engineering design)

problem basically is contacts i guess. and the fact that nigerians are bastard-s when it comes to paying up . some guy maybe an architect sends u some drawings to do a design on - u do em - send em to him when its time to pay he starts hemming and hawing . . .one just keeps at it because one day it may open a door . . .

i am also wary of self employment because skill in doing one thing does not necessarily translate to business savvy.

my first job was with a power engineering company run by my uncle. that man built most of the transmission power stations in naija back when he was employed. he's a brilliant engineer, but as a business man . . .na so so delayed salary etal

my second job was with a diff kind of one man biz - that man was an engineer, and he knew how to run a biz. .

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Thanks for this write up.The problem we are having with a lot of our educated folks are the 'i believe in my certificate will do it for me' rather than take time to learn or add enterpreuniship to their heads.

Man does not need to survive by 'white collar' jobs alone.

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It's funny when people reason one way.

I'm into both right now and know their pro's and con's.

I believe you speak for yourself.

People have built a fortune from investing part of their salaries.

Are you aware some people earn about a million naira a month?

You don't even have to earn as much to be a good investor, just know the tricks.

For every story like this,

There are those who invested millions and folded up too.

There are those who can't pay their workers salaries.

Being an entrepreneur in this country is challenging.

No power, no quality raw materials, poor govt policies etc.

It's certainly no stroll in the park.

It's never too late to enter the market.

There is room for everybody, just add the extra touch.

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I agree with NiajaECash and Ajanlekoko; being successful takes a lot more than just owning a business and nothing is stopping you from "doing it on the side."

To those wondering about what type of business to start, the easiest way is to ask the question “why” and try to find a solution to it. Chances are that whatever issues you have that forms the basis of your “why” question, other people have the same issues. It is easier to ask the question and find a solution in industries that you’re familiar with. I was an engineer and my issues tend to be technical in nature. However, the methodology, if you can call it that, works for any industry.

Here are some examples of how the process works:

Issue: Why can’t I watch a movie in the comfort of my home exactly when I want to watch it?

Solution: Video On Demand

Issue: Why can’t I rewind the soccer match playing on the TV to see the goal I missed while talking?

Solution: Digital video recorder

Issue: Why can’t I figure out exactly where my driver is at this particular moment?

Solution: GPS tracking device that can be monitored on the internet or mobile device.

Issue: Why can’t the police verify my identity (or particulars as it is called) when I get pulled over?

Solution: ***not telling:-)

Issue: Why can’t I figure out my way around Lagos?

Solution: GPS navigation

Issue: Why can’t I eat mango or any other seasonal food all year round (off season)?

Solution: Food processing

All the issues I listed above are some of the business ideas that I started/thought of starting/might be starting. Most of the ideas I listed are now moot because I got to the market too late.

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yme, ( and the house) pls can anyone tell me what kind of business on can run or do with 300-500k in a place like ph.

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@oyb,

There's hope for you yet!

I wish I could agree with you on this one, but . . .  hard evidence points to the contrary.

In my opinion, self-employment is indeed the beginning of financial freedom. Have you ever been in a situation where you compared yourself to a hustling compadre, who basically seems to have everything you have - i.e. comfortable home, family responsibilities, landed property and investment, etc, etc - but in reality only earns or makes maybe a tenth of what your nominal salary is? Dig deep, I'm sure you'll find someone like that.

I'll tell you a story about someone. An old schoolmate of mine, who was practically living off me  about six years ago. I'm not flattering myself, mind you, this guy's situation was that dire back then. No job, no nothing. I was able to find him a job with a PP client of mine, where he got paid about 50 grand a month. That job opened up a world of hustling for him, and he started doing many things on the side. Three years later he quit the company where he was working, and struck out on his own. Well . . . guess what, the guy has managed to put down like four houses in Lagos, owns a business that has offices in upwards of ten states, and is doing pretty well. Much better than I am, with all my position and salary. This one aint no fantasy o.

The bottom line is, I have noticed that the street hustlers always have this I-have-nothing-to-lose attitude, compared to the pretentious know-it-all attitude of those of us who work in offices. There's a even a guy who i know, who has made a huge fortune from selling apparel out of the boot of his car, to people like you and me who work in VI and Ikoyi offices. To add insult to injury, the guy is now loan-sharking his clothing clients!

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its cool to work for yourself but most times its also necessary to work for others inorder to get the cash and the xperience needed meanwhile you u invest your income,

check my signature,

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Biko nu. I never said all employments/employers are bad. I just said having a "job only" mentality or having no plan other than "jobs", doing or relying on nothing other than jobs, jobs as only source of income, a life planned around jobs, what the heck; the word, the idea of "jobs for life" is and I repeat DEMONIC.

Please help me here, if you work for a company and literally run the business yourself, yet you feel trapped and undervalued, definitely unappreciated because you are still accountable to probably an ingrate for a boss.

I also didn't say owning your business was a walk in the park. But, if you can work for somebody else effectively enough not to get fired every two weeks. Then you have most of the personal attributes like, commitment, discipline etc that is required to successfully run your own business - capital? totally up to you, but not always essential.

And please, let's not fool ourselves, you cannot afford to invest your salary, no matter how much you earn, unless you have no responsibilities. You can afford a saving however, but invest, IMHO, I'm yet to see.

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Lovely Post.

I have done both and presently my husband and I do own a Computers Solutions Company in the US Virgin Islands ( St. Croix to be exact). We were both professionals for years. He worked for IBM for donkey years and I in  real estate sales . we making OK money to be comfortable, but in June  2007, we decided to branch out and do our thing. Opened up our company.

Huge difference, not easy but definitely the best thing we did, as 2 years later, we are opening  a 2nd location in the St. Thomas area.  So I am of the premise that that being on your own will open doors that working for someone else will not. But being your own boss is no easy feat as discipline and extreme love and dedication to what you do becomes a major factor, and forget about having a social life in the first few years. But is it extremely rewarding?, hell yeah.

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You may be thinking that starting your own business will bring an end to all your financial woes. That is a gross misconception.

While I advise young people to start their own business, as early as they can, I do not subscribe to calling paid employment evil. Like someone already mentioned, it is a matter of time as your business expands, you will need to employ people. So if you are of the opinion that it is evil to work for others, then I wonder what you expect your staff to be thinking of you.

We need to understand certain issues:

1. Entrepreneurship is not for everyone. You ask why? The answer is simple, not everyone is ready to pay the price!

Please note that an entrepreneur is different from a self-employed person. It takes much more effort and sacrifice to become a successful entrepreneur than it is to become self-employed. An entrepreneur undergoes training takes actions which an average person consider risky!

Even though anyone can decide to become self-employed, success does not come cheap either. Being self-employed is not without it own disadvantages.

2. Being self-employed is not the same thing as owning a business! For example, a self-employed motor mechanic whose workshop is heavily dependent on him been present to attend to customers does not own a business. He is just an employee. The difference between him an another mechanic working in a corporate organization is that he is his own boss. This have advantages and disadvantages.

However, an experienced mechanic who started a workshop, built a system for running the workshop and employed capable hands to run the system such that he is not physically needed for the workshop to run successfully owns a business!

3. Being on your own means you are saddled with not only the provision of services or products for your clients, but also the management and survival of the business entity. This is not as easy as it seems. It is not easy to be the one saddled with the responsibility of taking day-to-day critical business decisions. I've experienced the anxiety associated with such in a little dimension and I can honestly say that it is not an easy one. It is a lot easier earning a salary than being the one worrying about how the staff salary for next month will be paid on time!

My conclusion is that anyone interested in entrepreneurship should take time to understand what it is all about. Robert Kiyosaki did a good job at explaining these issues in his series of books. There are other books that will also help your financial intelligence if you are desirous of quitting the rat race, e.g. Who Move My Cheese, The Richest Man in Babylon, Think and Grow Rich etc.

If you need my humble opinion or personal help, check me at Nigerian Entrepreneur. Cheers.

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Wow. It's like you read my mind. I'll just like to add that, when you're on a salaried wage, your ratio of productivity to reimbursment is fixed. In other words, if you bust your balls for your employers and they have a really good month, you still get your same salary and if you're lucky a bonus and a promise of promotion (which normally will not materialize) no matter how much extra money they make of your sweat.

Starting your own business involves a lot of risk and be under no illusions, is hard as hell, but the plus side is, no matter how small, it's yours to own and sell. And what you put in, is exactly what you get out.

Good month, you buy a new car, bad month, you chill and work harder.

Personally, this year, i'm doiing my own thing. I will be responsible for my own fate.

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precisely,

an employer with character is working for two sets of people - his clients and his employees

i guess what it comes down to is that self employment in naija is an euphemism for buying and selling

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Both have their advantages and disadvantages.

Who says one can't do both? You can be employed and still have something on the side.

Every individual should decide what he/she want's from life.

Some people are orientated towards career life, they educate themselves fully in their field.

Even though they get sacked, they're easily picked up by other companies.

Being self employed is not a guarantee that one will be successful.

If one isn't disciplined, then you can be a self employed pauper.

Many employed people have become millionaires through investing their salaries, it's all about discipline.

A lot of people think self employment is a tea party, be ready to work twice as hard.

Study yourself before deciding what you want. Like Socrates said, " Being know thyself".

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In as much as having your business is very good, the question is, how many of us are willing to take the risk involved?

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Guys, good talk. i like this kind of discussion. Please i would like to know what kind of business someone can start up with 200k. Am based in port harcourt and can come down to lagos and buy any thing. thanks

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I really like this topic a lot. I am still an employee in one the banks that are cutting cost seriously. I have been hearing abt being on your own for long and i have tried and crack my brain on what to do but yet could not point at anyting. I had put all my savings in stocks b4 it started sliding down, now i dont av much and really hungry to do something on my own. @ajalekoko, i really like your contribution and i will really appreciate it if you can advice or suggest with guidelines on what to do. egorat@yahoo.com is my mail. tx

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Agree with most above. Working for somebody else is ok for a young person. Afterall, you're young, you've just come out of school, probably no financial capacity to do anything else, no experience and all that. So working for someone at this point is not a bad idea - probably the best start. HOWEVER, you should always have a clear vision of a way out of the modern-day slavery called "a job".

Alternatively, you can continue this way if you want to take an excuse from your boss everytime you have to go to the loo for the rest of your life, let somebody else determine how much you are worth, get fired or made redundant and re-employed, only to get fired or made redundant again and God knows how many times that might happen. You can also remain an employee if it is your dream to miss-out on your childrens life (you are gone before they wake up and back home just after they've gone to bed - but that is another day's topic). Infact, I could write a book on the cons of being in a job. But the truth of the matter is that "jobs" are demonic - simply put. Please note, I didn't say work. Everything in life revolves around work (doing something). But having a job (corporate or not) is SLAVERY because it ends up controlling your life. It dictates what you can or cannot do, what you can or cannot afford. And you are only free from it when you retire at 75, broke, busted and disgusted. And the worst part, you have lost the best of your days just to pay your bills.

If you are reading this, there is still time. Please think of something at least.

Men need Income, not salary

Profit is better than wages

God help us.

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It is an important part but you can succeed when you do what you have passion for, it also help your pockets.

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^^^^

i am not discouraging anyone,

but its very irritating when people start assuming that 'self employment' is the beginning and end of 'financial freedom and all those other buzzwords'

in a way, being self employed can be a different kind of burden, especially if you are a responsible person, you now have the livelihoods of whole families as your responsibility - i say this because most nigerians who are self employed will simply not pay salaries when hit by hard times  - i have been there

banks lay off workers - hey if they had been self employed - no problem

okay lets look at it this way - banks are in trouble, therefore they cut back on their expenses, therefore they cut back on projects, therefore their contractors are out of business , and go broke  -

a depressed economy affects both employees and employers

and the really sad part about it is that most of these people touting self employment are looking to the us - the land of opportunity, where you can be an average joe, start a biz in your garage, and become an industry in 5 years.

there are no such stories in naija - dangote,, adenuga, otedola etc, no one can track their stories of their businesses, how they grew from a samll biz in an office to a sprawling

conglomerate.

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best thing is to start with what you have interest for,

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Owning your own business is a dream come true for many – and there are plenty of benefits that go along with being your own boss.

One of the best advantages – and the one we probably don’t even have to mention! – is that going into business for yourself means being your own boss. There’s nobody looking over your shoulder or telling you what to do. Gone are the traditional office politics and cubicle living, and in their place is the freedom to make the decisions you alone believe are best for the growth and success of your business.

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Did you know that you could be a successful business owner working only 17 weeks season in the tax preparation franchise industry? That’s right, just 17 weeks!

This seasonal schedule and flexibility allow tax industry franchisees to enjoy the rest of the year pursuing other interests. Spend more time with your family, take that trip around the world you always wanted… or even build another business! Click here to learn more about becoming a tax industry franchisee.

Owning your own business also makes you a vital part of the community where you live, work and play. Did you know that, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration, small businesses create two of every three new jobs, produce 39% of the gross national product, and invent more than half the nation’s technological innovations? Imagine the possibilities and contributions you could make to your community!

Another advantage of business ownership is the ability to control your own destiny. Large corporations can be adverse to change, while owning your own business can give you ability to make rapid decisions and implement course corrections when the economy dictates. In the ocean of business, mega-corporations turn like tankers, while small businesses have the speed and agility of a speedboat – something very important in our current economic climate.

Let’s face it – as an employee you can dedicate years of your life to a company only to find yourself out of a job because of some dumb move made by the guys at the top. A recession, management changes, mergers, acquisitions, downsizing and outsourcing all have a tendency to force sudden and unexpected change. However, if you own your own business, you’ll be facing today’s competition and change on your own terms.

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Newbie

I love your write up, what are the types of work we can do, for me am an undergraduate and l need advice on which area to do work. I want to make 2010 a remarkable one . Reply me on mail. ask4charles@ymail.com. Thanks happy new year to you.

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Newbie

Do not discourage anyone that wants to be on his or her own.There are people who have been like that for a long time before 'rich dad poor dad' author wrote that book.

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Newbie

@ op - na rich dad poor dad - a book too many nigerians have swallowed hook line and sinker

its become the nigerian version of the self help industry

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Newbie

Ask the guys that have just been sacked by banks.You wil get your answer.Life is not all about white collar jobs that most educated people ave been made to beleive in this country.

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Newbie

Its a thing of choice which ever pays more. I am self employed now but also worked for sometime. Both had its advantages and disadvantages

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Newbie

It is very impt.

I have been thinking seriously towards that line in the past one year and by the grace of God, this year is not going to pass me by.

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Newbie
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