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Nigerians Studying Abroad: Would You Go Back Home To Work?

I was involved in an interesting conversation with a woman I met on Sunday. She mentioned how she'd like to return home after finishing her education.

She was then ridiculed by others (also from West Africa) saying they'd never go back due to the constant wars, corrupt government/police, lack of adequate jobs and pay, and lack of developed areas.

She then stated that it will never get better if no one goes back to institute changes. She further stated that only those who came from poor homes would refuse to go back.

[Nigerians studying abroad], what would you do?

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114 answers

Oohhh DahonestBoss sweetie,U are a vibrant Nigerian en always helping ur fellow nigerians.The God lord shall continue to bless yah.I really appreciate ur contribution toward d study in finland thread also.

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^^^^ Good points.

Could you teach me (us) how you got this job in Naija from Helsinki?

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I am a nigerian studying in Finland, and i must confess that I would not think it twice of going home after my studies. it's a personal opinion and what I choosed. life is very interesting at home, unlike europe where you might be the only black shopping in the supermarket and everyone are staring at you like a masqurade, coupled with the cold and indoor life. I miss the Nigerian food, the culture and loved one and many other things. it might be a different decision to others, but no matter where you are, its all about being comfortable and appreciated. It would also be a good transition if you have a job waiting for you at home of which I already have. But remember, no matter where you are, no place like home.

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After my study in abroad, i will go back home to work. Even now some Nigerian abroad are looking for a way of coming back home to work because work here is even better than in abroad

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@ poster difinitely

theres soo many things that can be done back home

soo much money to be made

so much influence to exhibit

changes to encourage

government to aprehend

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please me i want to go back to naija, abeg am looking for a rewarding job,, if u get to know of any,kindly contact me, [b][/b]

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An expatraite is any individual hired as a non-national of the base country of work, normally requiring a work permit to work, rather than having a right to work based on citizenship.

My guess on exemption is probably because they probably pay tax to their home country, hence are exempted from local tax to avoid double-taxation.

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who are the expatriate and what is the condition required to be an expatriate? why must an expatriate be exempted from taxes?

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Here are some of the products of our local institutions.

http://www.nairaland.com/nigeria/topic-343996.0.html

The moo-rons I castigate there would not even get a volunteer writers job in a local estate news publication, talkless of a national newspaper.

But our "educated" Editors gave them roles and publish their junk. A western trained and educated Editor will NEVER give such quacks a breathing career. Different mentalities and attitude towards work and professionalism.

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^^

As per the salary thing, figures always vary, so I wouldn't really go there. I can just give you an idea of how the pay is structured

Oil and gas, I can only second-guess, as I don't work there.

Usually there is a standard salary scale across their global organization, and then a localization portion, based on which market they're hiring for. Oilcos do allow for negotiation based on the candidate's skills and experience, but for them, usually your Nigerian citizenship is the major reason why they would be talking to you, in order for them not to incur the costs for high risk relocation that they would pay a real expat. They hire a lot of Nigerians from outside, anyway, but the benefit structure would probably resemble that of a local hire.

For oilcos, they would pay like this:

Expat: Standard package + risk/inconvenience portion + monetized/unmonetized cost of living (house in ikoyi, car, and all the effizi)

Repat: Standard package + Localization portion (which includes the monetized/unmonetized cost of living)

Local: Standard package + Localization portion (which includes the monetized/unmonetized cost of living)

If I were a local engineer crossing over from, say, ExxonMobil to, say, Chevron, it doesn't follow that I would be offered less than the chap coming in from Aberdeen. It boils down to my value to Chevron, which is based on a mix of skills, experience, and qualifications, including previous renumeration.

For telecom, it is not yet standard, as they are not really into graduate employment. Telcos in Nigeria don't approach recruitment from the 'talent pool' perspective. They basically hire functional staff to run their operations, as opposed to oilcos who hire and develop staff based on discipline (i.e. engineers, geoscientists, accountants, etc). Telcos also seem to have adopted a traditional hierarchical structure, while the oilcos are a bit more flat. Telcos hire to fill positions, while oilcos hire for the talent pool.

For Telcos, they would pay like this:

Expat: Negotiated expatriate rates + monetized/unmonetized cost of living (house in ikoyi, car, and all the effizi)

Repat: Role-based package +(?) monetized/unmonetized cost of living +(?) relocation grants

Local: Role-based package. Cost of living is not really factored in, as the base pay in telecom is sometimes up to 90% of your total take home.

This is my view, mind you. There are a few threads around that address the actual money issue, for oilcos and telcos.

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You see, I always wonder what went through the minds of our policymakers when they make policies like the one that grants tax protection to expatriates. Most of them won't accord foreign nationalities the same privilege in their own country! Also, it is logical for a Nigerian who has acquired a foreign nationality to claim the same benefits as the expatriates because of the fact that Nigerian immigration laws applies to him/her as well. Do you know that such people have to apply for Nigerian visas to enter the country? They might even require a Work Permit!

Anyway, you brought up another interesting issue on salary standardization. This is a subject that I am quite interested in because there's no publicly available source of data to determine salary structure in some industries in Nigeria. It will be nice if you or anyone else on these forum can give we 'repats' an idea of what obtains in telecoms and oil and gas.

To the statement in bold above, are you saying that MTN staffs working in similar capacities in different geographic areas are receiving the same remuneration?

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^^

You're quite right, it is the employers that we should blame, coupled with the loose labour regulations in Nigeria.

Like I said, in a functional society, it should be illegal for Nigerian nationalities to earn expatriate benefits. That has nothing to do with bargaining power, but rather with a Nigerian national claiming expatriate benefits, such as tax protection.

In most MNCs in Nigeria nowadays, salaries are pretty much standardized. I know of oil and gas, and telecom. Nigerian 'repats' are hired based on their qualification and/or experience, not their location.

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@AjanleKoko

There are two fundamental issues raised by your post.

1. The problem is not with the "people" as you mentioned. It's rather with the employers. It's not the "people" that set the salary. Take for instance, the issue of foreign qualifications. Why should an employer favor someone with a foreign degree over someone with the same degree obtained from a University in Nigeria? The driver is the force of demand and supply. You know the drill.

2. How did "the huge disparities in wages between locals and expats" came to be? What do expats have that locals don't have in the first place? If expats who are non-Nigerians are paid certain remuneration, why shouldn't Nigerians who have the same level of experience and exposure as them be given the same treatment?

The blame is not on the "people want to earn huge wages, live in Ikoyi, be chaffeur-driven, etc, just because they came from 'abroad'". It is a totality of the mentality, cost of living and dynamics of the Nigerian society. It's also a function of negotiating power, i.e. how you sell yourself. It will be hard for you to find two people working the same job and being paid the same salary. There will always be disparity. It's one of the reasons why someone will leave one company for another. The same reason responsible for why someone might prefer a multinational company to a local company. All the "people" are asking for is to be treated fairly. If someone is hired by a company and is being offered a package that is more than what the locals are offered, then it's not that person's fault. The employer is to be held liable. That doesn't give us the right to castigate them or even hate them. It doesn't make them an inferior to other Nigerians. That is just my point!

Lastly, notice that I have the word "expatriate" in quote. The word is used in it's colloquial form, not necessarily representative of its dictionary meaning.

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Good Evening All,

I quite enjoy everybody contribution to this topic and our various decision is based on our background , experience and where we are coming from but the fact remains "No Place like Home".

Who does not want to return to his or her own town a celebrity or will you rather prefer to be nobody in the midst of many or a Champion or Hero in your own country? This is food for thought.

SADE! pls can you help me with the list of accrediated Skools in UK because am planning to come down for my Master in Project Management by September.

A not too expensive one pls.

Forward your findings to my mail, Vinnylove@justice.com.

Thanks

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Maybe you should clarify what you mean by the word 'expatriate' and why you feel you should be treated as one of such.

Sometimes, it sounds like people want to earn huge wages, live in Ikoyi, be chaffeur-driven, etc, just because they came from'abroad'. There was even a word invented in the early days of MTN, 'repats'. That word loosely referred to the MTN employees who came from outside Nigeria.

The term expatriate refers to foreigners in Nigeria, or non-Nigerian nationals. Nigerians holding other nationalities naturally would want to take advantage, owing to the huge disparities in wages between locals and expats. But Nigerians holding Nigerian nationality? It should even be illegal for them to do so.

As far as I'm concerned, you're either a permanent employee, a consultant, or a contractor. Terms and benefits should be structured according to what you are classified as. That's how it works anywhere else in the world, and Nigeria should not be an exception.

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@ Nana

Will not still come to Naija or you are already here.

Home is HOme oooooooooooooooooooooooo

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I'm all for going back home if the country and our people will welcome us with open arms. I'm beginning to see a trend where we seemed to be viewed as aliens by our own people! Some feel that we don't deserve being treated as "expatriate" since we are just "one of them".

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it goes in two ways. its either you come home and secure a job in nigeria as an expertraite or you stay out there and have a job whose wages is far higher than what an average nigerian earn

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Spot on.

We seem to not realise that the world is a global village these days. Unless you can gain the world's attention from Nigeria, which is not really possible as we all know, our guys need to go out there and prove that we are as good as the best of them. Y'all should read about India's rise in the last decade.

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Naija is still the place to be.

I came home because of the

Opportunities,

The weather,

Relaxed tax etc

Maybe i did it because i know i can always run back.

Thankfully, Naija is treating me right.

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Very apt perspective. This is what it should be.

The world is a global village; unless you are able to demonstrate while working in Nigeria that you are globally relevant, then you have to move to where you can get that recognition.

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I currently have a BScN and an MScN and currently a PHD candidate at the dissertation stage here in Canada.

I plan to go back to naija(although i'm a canadian citizen) to take up a faculty position in the field of Nursing.

I need to help develop naija's nursing curriculum. What I saw in some nursing graduates that i talked with during

my last visit to naija was just very disappointing.

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I believe it all depends on you and what you are after - The reason(s) for leaving Nigeria in the first place. Home will always be home, but it simply does not end there.

If you love your career and you want to acquire more education or work experience so that you'll be good at what you're doing, then I think a computer science graduate for example should not be talking about staying at home when microsoft in the UK or US or Oracle (just an example) offers him a job.

There are soo many things to learn in a developed country and I think one should also have a way of converting all these to money (It's all about strategy). You can make your money ANYWHERE these days. Forget about all those "talks". The system outside rewards hardwork and can pay ANYTHING if you have good value to ADD legally (and not FRAUDULENTLY o). I believe this is the case ANYWHERE in the world.

The world is quickly becoming one global village and the days of staying "sit tight" at home in the name of patriotism are over - forget about all those sentiment.

I work in the UK as a software engineer and I have Australians, Americans and a lot of Indians in my team. The company was compelled to open up a development center in India when they saw the quality of work the Indians in the company has to offer.

Let me ask this open question. How will Oracle be convinced that there are good software developers in Nigeria (and then set up a development center somewhere in Abuja or Lagos) if we all stay at home, work in banks as cash counters or in clearing - printing cheque books and do nothing to go out and show these guys that we're capable.

These guys expect a lot from Nigerians but we need to go out and show them. Then their confidence will grow and they'll be willing to open active operating offices (not marketing or sales offices o) in Nigeria.

It's all about planning and we outside (probably) still love Nigeria.

Cheers

L

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Life Is An Exercise in Pursuit of Happiness.

Home is Where Your Heart Is At Rest.

If Going Back Would Make You Happy Please Do.

Some People Head Back Home For Various Reasons. Whatever it It Is Make Sure You are Internally Convicted and Motivated To Do So.

With These You Will Have No Problem Adjusting. We Have A Large Pool of Lecturers that Schooled Abroad Lecturing in Nigeria Now. Believe it or not, they have contributed their own quota. No matter how small.

If staying out will also make you happy, then please feel free to. You can still contribute you own quota from there or be available when called upon for national assignment.

A good example is Dr Ngozi Okonjo Iweala.

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You killed it.This is the best post so far.Wow u so so sensible.

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My honest opinion is that I would PERSONALLY prefer to go back home. You might say it's because I have something I'm going back to but I think it's much more than that. I was always curious about life in Western countries and decided to take time off work to come to school in the UK and see what the life is all about. On the surface, it seems a good life i.e. good roads, constant electricity et al. But upon critical examination, I discovered that the system is set up to ensure that most of what you earn goes back to the system. I am uncomfortable with that as it does not tally with my aspirations as I would prefer most of my money in my pocket in order to invest and get out of the rat race soonest (a la RICH DAD, POOR DAD).

With this in mind, I am definitely going back home. The UK does not even offer me a better pay even with the N250 to I pound conversion.

The clincher for me is this: there is no way another man's country can be like your country. There are overt and covert ways that the system uses to remind you that you are an alien. I wouldn't blame them though as I would draw an analogy from a situation where a Nigerian and a foreigner are contesting for something in Nigeria. Common sense says that the Nigerian will be favored so I don't complain when UK citizens are favored in certain things here. I just count the days until I'm through with the program and I can go back to the land WHERE I AM KING IN MY OWN COUNTRY.

That, candidly, is my take on this.

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@ ONOSEN

Thats true, UK employers are more interested in the experience you have and not the qualifications you have.

Its a good thing to return to naija and possibly start a business rather than stressing out in so called "Jand".

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@onosen

well said

naija is the place, at least, there can be a savings!!!!!!!!!

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Its a good idea anyway.

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Though I was brn in uk I do have a passion to want to do something in Nigeria. Maybe build a business which would have branches in uk and Nigheria so that I could work in both places.

I really want to do somthing in Nigeria to make a diffference, or to plant the seed for change.

It at times pisses me off when nigerins in uk are quick to criticise nigeria, espacially since they base their criticisims on the racist media here.

I persoanlly beleiev its every nigerians duty to do somthing in their home land, NO EXCUSES. , HOWEVER ITS A 2 WAY THING, SO THE GOVERNMENT HAVE TO DO THEIR PART.

I have met many people who always use corruption as an excuse.

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Depends though. I have acclimatized (to some extent) to the ways of life in America, and enjoy it, but at the same time, I miss Naija. If the opportunity strikes, why not, I will take it. It may be in Naira, but sometimes the benefits can outweigh the value of the dollar.

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Hi Guys, i am also new. All the topics here are very interesting. I presently live abroad and I am in the process of going home to try things out. Of course it will depend on what kind of opportunities are out there for me.

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its cool that hotstepper's family friend is getting paid 10 million a year

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WHAT DOES DAT MEAN@ NILLA?

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my familyfriend just went back 3 weeks ago to start up a job offer starting with , a year

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I will go back home for the following reasons:

There is no place like home.

I believe there is a reason why we are born where we are born.

Really if we dont go back and help develop naija, who else will?

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Having read several meaningful contributions,i surmise

1 It's good to go back home and do something meaningful,but have an exit strategy in case things go not as expected

2 For those of you used to weekend /monthly grocery shopping,mall shopping etc make sure that the salary you would

earn should give you a lifestyle at least commensurate with that you enjoyed in the west

3 Look before you leap-i have friends that went back and found out that the naija way of doing business was still at its

best fouled up,ie corruption,nepotism,cronysm(which exists here too) and they still opted to fight it out.The moral ,be

prepared.

4 I have a "shop" back home with a couple of my friends but business aint easy-kissing Bottom,bribery etc are things i don't

condone but what can i do? If we continue to disparage our native country how would we progress?

5 All the best to my sistas and bros on their way back home.

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i don't think i will like to go back to my country after my education here in the state.This is because the career am goind for is not valued in my country.I want to make it real big that is why i came here. i may decide to go back when i am old and can't work again and look for a good business like trade.

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OF COURSE ILL GO HOME,AFTER MY SECOND DEGREE BUT ILL BE ON MY OWN NOT UNDER ANYONE,CANT IMAGINE GOING BACK TO LAW SCHL IN NIGERIA TO WORK FOR PEOPLE AFTER HOW MANY YEARS OF STUDY HERE? NO.

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@funloving

you have spoken the exact truth

Its not bad going back but its the ease of settling down and being comfortable that is questionable. You have to be really rich to live the kind of lives u live here with bare necessities made readily available. Think about not having light all the time which y'all used to, cept if u have a 24 hr generator. Think about water accessibility, police stopping u on the street all the time cos u drive a big car, buying land and building ur own house (no mortgage and loans readily available !!!)ets etc etc,

The price to pay working there is more than u would pay working here. what u have to work out is how much it will cost u to live and work in nigeria. (there r ofcourse advantages but the disadvantages, i think, far outweigh the advantages)

In asmuch as most of us will like to return home to work (myself excluded!!!), many will not be able to stand the harsh conditions as compared to what u r used to living outside.

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Well maybe the lady is right about only poor people not wanting to return to Nigeria and maybe not 'cos we all want different things in life.Been living in the UK for sometime now, stayed back after i completed my mba program. Just want to say that going back to Nigeria has its advantages and disadvantages, so also does staying put in abroad. In making such decisions, u have to get ur prioties right and stop blabbing about certain things like security in Nigeria, what makes? Pls GOD is the only that provides that. Also look at luck and chances, see u cld get lucky in Nigeria, u know right people,right places at the right time and then boom u r it. However if u r contented with the basic neccessities of life, then living abroad is the right choice, u know u have got job security, the basic needs of life including electricity but you know u might not become what u want to be even if you r good at what u do. U either r risk averse and keep being a second class citizen abroad or be a risk taker and see if u might be lucky enough to be a star in ur home country.Different strokes for different folks!

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if the situation there is good i would definitely go back home to work

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Good responses from u all, but dont forget the place of God. Seek his guidance!

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Good responses from u all, but dont forget the place of God. Seek his guidance!

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