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Where Can One Buy Premium Fuel ( High Octane )?

Folks ,

where can one buy premium fuel ( high octane fuel ) in abuja & lagos?

and who knows d type of fuel ( octane number ) we have in nigeria?

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Good Morning nkc,

You haven't replied to my last message!!

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I have researched over twenty-one (21) octane booster products, and Nulon PSO is the best, sensible and honest money can buy.  The only other product that out performs PSO is race fuel.

As fellow Nairaland member I am more than happy to supply nkc with a few bottles at cost.  Furthermore, if you are in Lagos I can also let you have a free sample (bottle) to test the product.

The choice is yours!!!

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Thanks

I'll Keep In Touch

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Dear nkc,

No doubt you have been bombarded with so much info,

At he end of the day only you can decide on the way forward for your particular circumstances Please digest the product bulletin I sent you very carefully Nulon PSO will solve our low octane petrol problems in Nigeria, with damaging your vehicle, Period.

I wouldn't dream of adding any harmful additives to my vehicle. The choice is yours!!!

By the way have you had an engine malfunction warning light appear on your instrument panel?

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nkc, some more news for you from google:

Octane numbers are something we see every day and probably take for granted. We all know this is a rating means to measure a fuels resistance to pre-ignition, but how does that apply in a practical sense. Let's first assume you have a car that runs well on 91 octane. What could you gain by altering the fuel you fill up with. By going down to 87 octane you will achieve better mileage, but could risk detonation depending on your cars engine. By going up to 93 octane you might allow your car to advance the timing gaining horsepower. Due to lower BTUs per gallon you will give up a few miles per gallon. So right off you can see that it is a balancing act.

Looking closer at this, you notice that the extra horsepower comes from the ability of the car to advance timing and not the fuel itself. Higher octane fuel has less BTUs, but still nets power due to the timing advance and higher boost it can achieve. In modern vehicles with knock sensors the timing is constantly varied to achieve the best balance between performance and economy. Because this adjustment takes time, simply switch to higher octane at the track is not good enough. The fuel needs to be run in advance to allow the car to compensate for it. So using 91 all he time and then going to the track and filling up with 95 is not going to help your track times. You will have a faster car on the ride home though.

The other end of the spectrum is less octane. The down side here is the risk or pre-ignition and high EGTS. Both of these can lead to melted or bend pistons. Valves and the head is also placed in risk. If you have a modern vehicle it will detect this and slowpoke timing to prevent damage. This timing modification is easy to detect with an OBDII scanner and it an easy to diagnose too fuel with too little octane.

Because of the above reasons, a lot of people turn to the boosters as a way of having both good fuel commonly and good performance at the track. The problem with them is most do not work. If you do find one what works, adding it to your tank a day before you go to the track can be beneficial. Despite the benefit, use boosters sparingly as most rely on MMT as a means of boosting the octane. Excessive MMT can cause problems with sensors, injectors, or even the exhaust.

By now you are probably confused again by what all of this means. To sum it up, if your car has no changes to compression, raised RPM limiter, or lots of boost, you should probably use whatever fuel the dealer recommends. If you have a race built motor, stick to a race fuel that meets the need of your engine. If you have a lightly tuned engine and enjoy the occasional track day, throw in a bottle of octane booster the day before and call it a day. Do not rely on boosters all of the time.

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Dear nkc,

Following our previous conversation I am now on the ground (in Nigeria) and available to answer any questions you may have.  The Octane Booster is called Pro-Strength Octane Booster (PSO), manufactured by Nulon in Australia.

Nulon PSO is specifically formulatd to incease the the octane rating of petrol used in high performance and competition engines.  PSO will boost RON by up to 7 numbers (70 points), hence, it is very appropriate for the petrol dilemmas we face in Nigeria.

If you want to experience the unquestionable and substantiated benefits of PSO please feel free to contact me. 

My Nigerian contact number is 0803 643 43 44, while my UK numbers are +44 117 917 5217 and +44 7770 582 888.

I am also attaching a product belluten for your perusal.

Welcome to an enjoyable driving experience.  It is your vehicle and your peace of mind - only ask for the best!!

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u can mail me, check my profile

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By the way, how can I make contact with you in Nigeria?

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sure am intrested, but how can u we confirm it can boost d rons up to d point u r talking about, and whats d name of d product and its active ingredients? so i can understand d physics and science of such boost

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I already have some stock on its way to Nigeria. I will also be in Nigeria in three weeks time. Is the product of any interest to you?

Your thoughts and opinions are very welcome,

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wen u get it to naija den inform us, thanks

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I am currently working on a price structure for the Nigerian market. The price tag is estimated to be between 2500 and 3000 Naira per bottle.

I will no doubt give you further details if the product is of interest to you. Bulk buying and large customer interest will certainly make a BIG DIFFERENCE to the price above.

The costs and logistics associated with bringing this product to the market are considerable, as well as complex.

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Hi nkc,

Thank you for your vehicle details.  Am I right in assuming your Passat is a V6 with 30 Valves.  As you rightly said your vehicle requires premium fuel.

The USA use a slightly different measurement for its fuel, namely, Pump Octane Number (PON).  Most other countries use the Research Octane Number (RON) method.

Premium unleaded fuel in the States is equivalent to RON 95, used in the rest of the world, e.g. Nigeria and Europe.  In short your car needs RON 95 to run effectively and achieve optimum performance.

The Octane Booster I use in my Jeep comes in a 500ml bottle, which treats 60 litres of fuel - Perfect for calculations/measurements for your Passat.

Bearing in mind the relatively low cost of petrol in Nigeria (70 Naira per litre), the question is, how sensitive are you to paying more for better quality fuel?

By my calculations it currently cost you approximately 4,200 Naira to fill up your tank.

In the UK we are currently paying the equivalent of 248 Naira per litre, and it is rising every day! This equates to 14,880 Naira for a 60 litre car.

All the best.

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Hi there nkc,

From my extensive research of the Nigerian market there isn't an effective octane booster that can cure our fuel problem, i.e. raise the Octane from 90 to at least 95. 

The majority of fuel additives in Nigeria are either primarily designed as engine cleaners or only produce minimal increases in octane levels.  The other thing to watch out for is the manufacturers reference to "actual increases in octane numbers".  A significant number of octane boosters claim to increase octane by 2 or 3, which is true.  But these numbers actually mean 0.2 or 0.3 and not 2 or 3 whole numbers.

The octane booster I have been using is one of the best in the world, and boosts octane by up to 7 RON Numbers (70 points).  In effect this product will easily do the job.

By the way, what vehicle do you drive; what is its year of manufacture; and how many litres (capacity) is your petrol tank.  Such information is crucial to advising you on whether you really need an octane booster and how much you should use per tank of petrol.

As I said before - If you look after your vehicle it will certainly look after you.

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Hi Siena,

Thanks for the information.  I looked at Castrol and Millers during my research, but they are not powerful enough to raise the octane number to RON 95 for Nigeria.

Nigerian fuel demands an increase of at least 5 RON Numbers to effectively boost the octane.  Would your clients be interested the Octane Booster I use?

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Touareg, I don't have a car in Nigeria - haven't been there in 18 years.

But, I have clients in Nigeria, who either used to live in the UK, or regularly shuttle between the UK and Nigeria.

Some of them buy octane booster, which I send to them.

The only ones I recommend, from experience, are Castrol and Millers.

They are extremely potent, a lot of modified turbocharged cars I work on here run these too, as high boost levels often require a much higher octane rating than regular petrol here has.

Typically, octane ratings here are 95, 97 and 99.

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Very interesting write-up, Touareg.

Good to know Nigerian petrol is indeed unleaded - I was confused when Nkc said cars sold in Nigeria were designed for unleaded use.

And as I previously stated, the RON number is very important.

Too low, and the car underperforms, and becomes extremely thirsty.

In some cases, detonation can occur, and piston crown / exhaust damage is the next thing.

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Good Afternoon Gents,

I came across this forum by chance – and I have read your collective discussion with great interest.  If I may I would like to try and clarify some of the comments and opinions that have been expressed. 

I am not an expert, but years of thorough research for personal and business reasons, have given me invaluable knowledge on petroleum and petroleum based products.  I would therefore, like to share this knowledge with you.

Firstly, Nigerian premium petrol, also referred to as premium motor spirit (PMS) is fully unleaded.  Lead was completely removed from our fuel around about 2002.  SO PLEASE DON’T REMOVE YOUR CATALYTIC CONVERTER.

Secondly, for some strange reason our government chose to opt for a single octane grade of RON 90 as a standard specification, although local blending with imported fuel may result in achieving RON 91 in some costal locations.  In short RON 90 is the national minimum standard.  This is unlikely to change until we achieve full deregulation within the petroleum sector.

Thirdly, most modern cars around the world are designed to run efficiently on a minimum octane grade of RON 95.  Your vehicle handbook should give you the minimum octane (RON) grade required for optimum performance.  Please note the cars originating from North America may refer to a different octane standard.  I am more than happy to clarify your individual vehicle specifications. 

Also please don’t be misguided by the phrases ‘regular’ and ‘premium’.  For example, Nigerian petrol is referred to ‘premium’, but only carries an octane rate of RON 90. These phrases can be confusing, to say the least.

The low octane rate of our petrol is key factor to a significant number of the problems our vehicles experience on a daily basis. Another key factor is our poor maintenance culture.

NOW TO THE GOOD NEWS – Apart from having RON 95 at the petrol pumps, the only other way to achieve a substantial increase in octane at the pumps is to use an effective and powerful OCTANE BOOSTER.  Such a booster will need to be powerful enough to achieve an increase of at least 5 (five) RON NUMBERS (i.e. from RON 90 to RON 95).

I have been using such a product in my VW Touareg since 2006, and it is the best honest money can buy.  Based on my detailed research, I sourced and acquired direct access to the product.  I have also recently acquired the right to market the product in Nigeria.

I love and respect my vehicle and I will only feed it the best minerals and stake – You are all more than welcome to share in this driving experience.  The dilemma isn’t about how you can get the product; it is whether or not you are prepared to continue filling your vehicles with inferior/inappropriate fuel.

If you look after your vehicle it will certainly look after you,

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@chipass

pls can u go and find out d type of fuel d cars they sell use, thanks, if its leaded or unleaded,thanks

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@ nkc,

Having this conversation is very useful. Thanks.

About going to VW in Nigeria, I went to them when I first noticed the check engine light. They told me they couldn't address my problem because the car was American spec.

I guess I will begin a very delligent search for an exhaust expert for the job at hand.

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well someone played u, but not to worry passat is a solid car even if it has 200k miles , siena can vouch also for that

now back to, removal of cat, i idid mine in enugu, but i presently stay in abuja, all u need to do is look for a trusted exhaust mechanic, if u dont know one, one can be referred to u by friends, u know there worth, when u get there, ask him if he knows how to remove, catalyst from exhaust, his explanation to u, will either convince u, or make u change yur mind, but most guru exhaust mechanics, know what a catalyst stuff is and how to remove, as siena said they should be careful with the connection going to d lambada probe( they should disconnect it and keep the wire taped in a secure location, no shaking) then they can remove the lamaba probe(catalyst).

as for fuel consumption, from my interaction with siena, removal of the probe, will cause the car to recalculate, air/fuel mix using the MAF, and dis will not cause any fuel consumption as long as your MAF is in order, but again from sienas interaction, they r leaded lambada probes( which his supposed to help get the part numbers for us and post for us to buy in case we have access to one ), if u get hold of these, u r better off, putting it in place of the unleaded one, and all will be well.

now dis brings me to my question, in nigeria, vw has an office, they sell cars, i would like to know if the cars they sell use leaded or unleaded, cos if its leaded, u may take d car to them , and tell them u want a leaded oxygen sensor, or if its unleaded, what do they do to the ones they sell so that d oxygen sensors dont fail instantly, u get my drift.

hope dis helps?

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Thank you for your reply. 

I faced the same dilemma and confusion back in 2006.  Almost everyone I spoke to in Nigeria about our fuel did not have a clue whether we had leaded or unleaded petrol.

In the end I had to speak directly with a number of  key personnel within NNPC, who confirmed our complete conversion to unleaded fuel.

By the way, all cars designed (manufactured) for Nigeria are designed to use unleaded fuel. 

Do you have a vehicle in Nigeria? and if so, how have you overcome the low octane in our petrol?

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@ NKC and siena

I drive a 2001 VW passat American spec. I've had problems similar to those described by u and Siena on this thread. My check engine light wont go off. On speed, the car appears to misfire frequently and I think there has been loss of power though I'm not sure by how much. A check on the manual says when the check engine light blinks, it means that cat is damaged. Mine blinks, remains steady for about a week or two, goes off for a day or two, resumes blinking and stays on for another couple of weeks. And the cycle repeats.

Since you've fixed this problem before, where can I take the car (in Lagos) for this to be fixed/ have the cat removed?

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funny thing is d new model passat been sold in nigeria by VW uses unleaded , so what is happening or am i wrong?

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so what u r saying in earnest, is one can de-cat, no reprogramming and d air-fuel mixture will be alright, car will be fine, cos d minimal effect wont be noticed, and dis should work over extended periods right?

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secondly, if i put a new pipe in place of d catlyst pipe, without reprogramming, the ecu, will it still work well or i must have to reprogram

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The car will calculate fuel maps based on MAF readings.

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@siena

ok pls check them to see what they have

secondly, if i gut or remove, how does d car now calculate d mixture correctly, since there are no o2 sensors, i think de cating is better, just a new pipe welded in place of d 02 neck pipe.right, i did it in my 92passat, some triangular stuff or so, with lots of holes, d day i removed it, it was like d car was removed of a lump in d throat?

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I have never done it myself, it's just something I saw on a forum some years back. I know you'll need different numbers to make up the codes to run, but not sure what.

Power would not be affected. But, it's a lot easier just to run leaded Lambda probes. I'll check with my local VW dealer tomorrow.

The catalysts are best deleted, regardless of the route you take. You can either have them gutted, as I described earlier, or you can buy de-cat pipes. They are just pipes that bolt in place of the regular catalysts.

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i hear u say d catalyt can block

when d loop is closed will is still work as to block d catalyst or will it stop working?

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@siena

thats why i like u,

so with vagcom, i can close d loop and d lambada will be impotent, am sure u know how to do it, so why not give me a guide, with d materials i told u i got can i do it on my own, thanks

and afta loop closing d car will still have d normal power right?

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If the Lambda sensors are contaminated with lead, they'll be rendered ineffective.

The car will lose power, and in cases, the CEL lamp will be illuminated, indicating the ECU has gone in limp-home mode.

Bear in mind, the CEL may NOT always illuminate. As power is lost over a period of time, you'll be unlikely to notice the loss of performance, but the problem will be there.

It MAY be possible to use VAG-COM to set the ECU to run without closed-loop emission control, i.e not use the Lambda's for control, but it's a complex procedure, and you'll need the basic engine settings and block values / codes to make it all work.

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@siena

if i dont change d o2 sensor and just use octane booster, what will happen, thanks

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During the course of rebuilding different engines, I have compared part numbers, as I also thought the materials in the valve seats / valves in modern engines differed between cars destined for export to SA and other countries where leaded petrol is still in use. This does not apply to personal imports.

The part numbers are the same. There are 2 types of valve seats - hardened, and unhardened. Unhardened were used in some older engines designed for leaded, though some were hardened from the onset, all these required were manual retarding of the ignition timing.

Typically, there are 3  types of valves - hardened, unhardened, hardened AND sodium filled. Sodium dissipates heat better, and is generally used on high compression and / or turbocharged engines, sometimes on inlet and exhaust, but more often than not, on the exhaust side alone. From memory, these do no suffer failure as a result of lead being introduced into the fuel system. It's the Lambda that goes haywire. It regulates the emission content, and also optimises fueling.

If it's damaged, the car goes into limp-home mode, and MAY missfire. If the engine missfires regularly, unburnt fuel is allowed to enter the catalyst / catalysts, where it eventually overheats. If this occurs, the ceramic / uranium core eventually melts, and blocks the catalysts. In such cases, the exhaust valves and seats MAY be damaged. In severe cases of collapsed / blocked catalysts, the car may not run at all, as the gases can't exit the exhaust.

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Fotodady, As far as I know, it's the other way round.

Some older engines designed for leaded did not have hardened valve seats, and the lead in the petrol acted as a "buffer". Running these engines continiously on unleaded gave rise to VSR (valve seat recession) which was a problem here in the UK back in the early to mid '90's, when leaded petrol was gradually withdrawn.

I had many a client then, who needed hardened valve seats machined into their cylinder heads.

These days, EMS are a lot more sophisicated, and there's greater control, and compensation, if the wrong grade of petrol is added. More important these days, is the RON number (knock properties). The EMS will only operate within a limited range - too low, and detonation will occur. This in turn will cause the engine to run a lot hotter, and the valves and seats (mostly the exhaust side) will get burnt and pitted, and eventually, the engine becomes sluggish, as compression is lost.

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The issues with leaded petrol in an unleaded car with catalyst, is not engine damage.

The engine itself WILL tolerate lead, however, the catalyst won't. Also, the Lambda Sond (oxygen sensor) is designed to operate on lead-free petrol, so the probe will be contaminated.

My advice is to have the catalyst (twin catalysts on the B5.5 Passat) removed. Easiest way is to have them removed from the car, cut open, then the core carefully removed, the cats can then be welded back closed, and replaced. Observe local legislations (if they exist) when disposing of the material.

Then, the Lambda Sond should be replaced with one designed for leaded petrol. Cars built for the SA market have these fitted as standard, to run with leaded petrol.

With 91 RON petrol, engine retardation takes place automatically, dependent on engine speed, temperature and load, so nothing to adjust. As long as knock sensor is working fine, (again, 2 on the B5.5 Passat) there'll be no running issues. Just don't expect the engine to run at peak power or efficiency on 91 RON. From memory, the optimum is minimum 95 RON. The 2,771 cc V6 30V is a high compression engine (10.5:1).

As Fotodaddy advised, octane booster won't hurt, and will increase engine efficiency and power marginally. MPG will be better too - an engine with slow ignition timing will slurp petrol at an alarming rate.

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all fuel in nigeria are mostly premium fuel,,,, mostly 91RON. but remenber all cars can do with regular fuel , the engine just got to slowpoke the timing. Just fill up and dont sweat it.

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okay i will be waiting

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