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What Is Web Accessibility?

The days of "Browser Compatibility Issues" have come and gone. Here is another of its kind which I'll like to know what my colleagues out here have to say. This is somewhere we must surely look into else, we might be side-tracking our website surfers. Don't you think so? For me, I believe a website should be made accessible by all so that calls for what we think and what we do to ensure we achieve this aim. The whole thought now brought about the topic

"What is Web Accessibility?"

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Omni how many browser do you have ?

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The basics

The idea behind web accessibility is ensuring that everyone, regardless of their platform, browser or personal situation can easily browse your website. This often (but not always) involves the need for the following things:

    * High contrast versions of your pages being available

    * Alternate text being placed on links and images

    * Links being appropriately named, for those with text-to-speech browsers

    * Testing your site without Javascript and CSS turned on

    * Providing appropriate META data

It’s not just about disability…

Obviously, designing our websites with disabled users in mind is an important task, and something we shouldn’t take lightly. But the fact is that web accessibility applies to so many other areas as well. If you’re browsing websites on your iPhone, 3G Phone or even WAP mobile, you’d better hope that the designer considered accessibility when putting the site together. Nowadays, people can browse the internet on a TV or game console, kiosk machine, handheld computer, or even a fridge! Ensuring your designs are accessible mean that you don’t prevent these people from visiting your site.

but that’s also important!

Disabled users struggle when accessing websites for many reasons. Those who have sight problems won’t be able to pick out your intricate colour scheme, so providing an alternate – high contrast – CSS document will allow them to see your site clearly. Distinguishing links may also be a problem, so providing clear roll-over effects makes it obvious what can be clicked.

For the same reason, text-to-speech browsers are available which read out the contents of a web page to the visitor. Using ALT text for images and clearly labeling links is vital here, so that someone can navigate your website without actually having the visual elements.

People commonly also struggle to use a mouse and keyboard easily, and so use voice controlled browsers and software.

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As we know, all ds browsers are built by different manufacturers nd consequently av different rendering engines - webkit, trident and co. Even ones using the same engines may av different implementatns of it. An example of ds is d interpretation of d CSS background ppty: bottom (http://blog.ngbot.com/articles/79/)

I which i could test d ul snippet but IE6 is far gone on my system. What happened in d 2 browsers? Which of d browsers' interpretatn are w planning to follow? What is d effect of ds on it: list-style:none?

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So omni, are you saying that all you did was remove the UL tags? If so, you are wrong on 2 fronts.

I await other answers.

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Yawa go soon ti de oooooo!

What I meant by the days of Browser Compatibility has come and gone is based on the thread. It is no more ranking high like it did some weeks back.

Your code, I stumbled on that kinda problem just some minutes before seeing your post and see what I did to rectify it. I don't care if it is correct now but since it solved my problem for now, I let it there for now.

<ul style="margin: 0;">

<li>Item 1</li>

<li>Item 2</li>

</ul>

<li>Item 1</li>

<li>Item 2</li>

You can correct me as no one is perfect. Just told you what I did to correct mine.

More contributions on the main topic before.

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